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Making Christmas Candy Sticks

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by alekei, Nov 18, 2007.

  1. alekei

    alekei Member

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    Hello!

    i need to make 4 Christmas candy sticks for a stage production. They must be about 5 ft tall.

    What do you suggest?

    Thanks!

    Alekei.
     
  2. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Do they have to be candy canes or just straight sticks?

    If just straight sticks, you could just take some white PVC pipe and wrap it with red ribbon. Or you could paint on the red, but that may take longer and be more messy. I suppose you could do a curved candy cane the same way, as they have PVC fittings that are curved, but you wouldn't get a smooth surface around the fitting.
     
  3. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    Carpet is often sold on large diameter heavy cardboard tubes. A carpet store may give those away.

    We've painted them red, then used wide white tape to make the stripe.

    I can't help much with the curved part. I once considered trying to heat and bend a larger diameter PVC pipe, but never tried it. I was concerned that the pipe would kink even with the heat. I think one can fill the pipe with sand so that the shape is held during the bend, but I never tried bend pipe over 1-inch in diameter. (Heating the pipe can be dangerous - flame, noxious gases, hot materials - don't try it indoors.)



    Joe
     
  4. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    I agree with most of the suggestions mentioned already. If they are just "sticks" the PVC pipe will work great. Krylon, which is a spray paint available here in the States, makes a product called "fusion" which is a paint which bonds to plastic, on a molecular level. I highly sugggest using this as a way to paint PVC pipe, as almost anything elses will start to flake off in no time.
     
  5. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    How big does the diameter need to be?
    I was thinking that you could buy some decorative outdoor ones from a home center and extend them with more pipe.
     
  6. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I have bent PVC with heat guns before, just be sure to heat it evenly and have a jig... (or a trash can/paint can/whatever) to bend it around.
     
  7. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    But not a spray paint can please.
     
  8. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I've seen plumbers use a spring on the inside of a soft copper pipe to prevent kinking. I suspect a similar approach would work while heating 4" PVC, but am unsure where to get the appropriate sized spring.
     
  9. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    What's the largest diameter PVC pipe you've been able to bend? Was it thin wall (like for drainage) or Schedule 40 (like for water supply plumbing)?

    (I may need to try this sometime.)

    Actually, I guess that's a general question to anyone else, too.

    Thanks

    Joe
     
  10. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I have done up to 2", thick wall diameter, can't remember what size though. The trick is to use muliple heat guns and get it heated evenly. You want is hot enough to be plyable but not too hot that is starts caving in and kinking. Take it slow and work with it. I know some people pack the PVC with sand to keep it from kinking, never done it myself but they say it works. I have done the packing thing when working with steel and it helps, so could be worth a try.
     
  11. Drmafreek

    Drmafreek Active Member

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    Another way to heat up the PVC indirectly is to put the PVC in a piece of steel pipe and heat the pipe with a torch of some kind. This allows for a more even heating then a heat gun directly applied. Not saying the heat gun doesn't work, just another option.
     
  12. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    I'm thinking out loud here and need some help with the idea...

    What about that black flexible 4"-5" tubing used for drainage? It seems to me it might be easier to lock that stuff into a bent shape than bend a straight piece of PVC. I've got no idea how off the top of my head but it might be worth considering. It would also require smoothing out the ridges. Wrap it in fiberglass? Bondo? Build a wooden round shape to slide in the end, screw through the outside to lock the shape then use muslin to seal it all off and smooth the surface? It seems like a solution that requires less skill and less equipment than the multi heat gun approach.

    Any ideas?
     
  13. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    I considered doing something like that years ago (but the need for it went away.) I was going to use plywood to make a form and use dryer hose rather than drainage pipe. I never resolved how to smooth it out, though I had considered using red and white duct tape to give it a smoother finish.

    Joe
     
  14. sloop

    sloop Member

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    Wrap the pipe with flocking or thin soft foam then cloth. that will smooth the texture out and give you a nice painting surface.
     

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