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Makita Replacement Batteries

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by avkid, May 27, 2008.

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Which is a better battery for a cordless drill?

Poll closed Jun 26, 2008.
  1. Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH)

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  2. Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cad)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. They're the same

    2 vote(s)
    66.7%
  1. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    I have an older Makita cordless drill.
    [​IMG]
    Lately i've noticed a slightly diminished run time.
    Considering the batteries are at least 15 years old I thought it might be a good idea to replace at least one of them.
    -
    So which is better, Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) or Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cad) and why?
     
  2. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    Is anyone there?
     
  3. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    NiMH are typically better, but you should first consider what is compatible. Not every battery type works with every product.
     
  4. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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  5. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    There are two models of that type battery.
     
  6. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Not that old, I had it’s predicessor at one point. Batteries normally last about three years if the Ni-Cad type, boat’s out on the Ni-MH type in shelf life. Possibly a question of phase harmonics, extent of use - daily verses infrequent, charging by way of tool left for months without use & without run down or constant run-downs inspite of constant use, or constant charging the battery in balance, with leaving it in the carger for long periods etc. Lots of factors in a battery life - incredible amouts of them which even the battery manuals don't cover especially in newer or older manuals. One hour verses fifteen minute chargers also will play a factor etc.

    Wow, you not just still have the case but still use it? Wow. Remember your version, even had M-16 rifle type ammo pouches for the batteries, and the flash light plus cordless saw, even got to use the cordless jigsaw at one point and it was a great thing. Forget, was that the version that introduced the thermostat that protected the motor from over working and confounded tech people forever after that? This much less when battery memory was introduced to the industry by Makita, than immediately removed from the batteries - them memory chips as to charge length of time? Believe this was the series that had them which given the “improved version” brought the DeWalt 12v to market and standardization over the as cordless drills were called “Makita” in era’s of development.

    Wow memory lane. Did if it does have the thermal, did you bypass it yet? On the other hand... that drill looks really clean - no dirt on any of the components, what’s up with it?

    Really believe this was that confounded version with the memory batteries that to this date still confounds the industry in people discharging the battery when they don't have to, much less the drill that once warm went into a mode of... "gee I'm warm, I'm going to stop working in mid-drilling in of this screw, you can wait around until I'm sufficiently cool enough later in finishing the screw but I don't promess you that I won't be still too warm afterwards to drive in a second screw without coffee break..." Yea, fondly remember that drill type, answer was a lot of them and a freezer near by. Remember it, the "HD" version before it one I loved, and the 9.6v/12v hi-bread version directly following it before batteries from them took on the mushroom shape.

    Ah' memory lane... Used my 9.6V think it was like a 90621HD or something like that in still having its manual and being able to look it up, for years. Did the 14.4v thing and never went back, this even though the debate of pistol grip verses T-Handle by way of DeWalt than became the next problem. What.... changing balance points and ways to hold the drill... what don't people get that they once did with the Makita drills in now preferring the T-Handles?

    From my memories of Ni-MH verses Ni-Cad in concept, the Ni-Cad is a normal battery as it were in type. Lots of power for the initial phase and it trails off from there. Ni-MH is more the long life lamp type of battery. You (unless seriously improved since they came out) give up some overall power in exchange for overall battery life and a more balanced linear curve to that power drain. Should also last a longer life perhaps - this given the three year for me is based on 14.4v batteries and the lower the voltage, often the shorter the lifespan of the battery. Still the batteries are available, have at, was a good drill type and a really good brand. Main problem with this and the earlier styles of Makita were the clutches stripping out - this aside from the thermostat (if in this series) and lack of variable speed (if in this series.) Still a good drill for in a pinch work, and very dependable as long as you don’t abuse and or over-use it. Send it in at least every other year for a lube job also as it’s very important.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2008
  7. curtg

    curtg Member

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    Buy compatible batteries. My original Makita drill/driver is 30 years old. Paying $30 for a battery every five or six years isn't a hardship. What damages batteries is milking the last bit of power to get the screw in.

    Also consider getting a powerful corded drill for the tough jobs that kill batteries. The right tool for the right job will let you work more efficiently.

    Finally, I really like the new Makita equipment. Lighter, more powerful, and many useful features. I think there is enough difference to abandon the old for the new.
     
  8. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    It is at least 15 years old.
    It was bought for my grandfather about 3 years before his death in 1995.
    -
    It turns out that I need a drill ASAP for my summer job as a set carpenter so I went to Lowe's with a $100 budget.
    The stock was pretty low, considering Father's day is coming up pretty soon.
    The only things left were DeWalt, Black & Decker Firestorm and Skil.

    The Dewalt felt too "plastic" to me, and B&D seems to have quality issues so they throw in ridiculous extra features.
    -
    The Skil on the other hand, is balanced from front to back, has an all metal gearbox, 2 batteries, a solid chuck and forward/reverse buttons that work with my fat fingers.
    - - Model #2895-01
    [​IMG]
     
  9. curtg

    curtg Member

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    I think you did very well. New technology and two batteries!
     

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