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Memory Lighting Control Systems

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by derekleffew, Sep 13, 2008.

  1. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Last edited: Mar 17, 2018
  2. Darthrob13

    Darthrob13 Active Member

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  3. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    It was time to open up some of the manufacturers catalog binders still on the shelf.

    - Colortran Prestige 3000-2000-1000 at least as early as March 1985, according to the date on the brochure. Possibly the intro's were 3000, then 2000, then 1000, as the 1000 brochure has an August 1985 date.

    - Colortran Channel Track and Patchman were built by ETC for C-Tran, BTW.

    - Colortran Patchman brochure has a 1982 date on it. My operations manual says 1983

    - I have a TTI catalog with 2 memory consoles, the catalog is dated 1981.
    - The PTR Prompter - 24,36,48 & 60 channel versions, single CRT, Cassette or Floppy storage, designed to be portable as it has a handle on the front.
    - The D-1999 Lighting Control Center, full sized desk, 120 channels.

    - From the Strand Century book:
    - A LightBoard XP - no date, 4000 dimmers. Possibly around 1990 as it is shown with the DC90 dimmer
    - The July 1981 catalog of the Light Palette shows it simply as Light Palette, no I, II etc...
    - I have a 1977 SC catalog for the baby brother of the Multi-Q, called the Micro-Q, which I used in one of my spaces at BC. 2 scene controller with memory add-on modules.

    - My Express 250 serial numbers give a June 1997 manufacturing date and I'm pretty certain they were introduced at least a year earlier, as I had a demo. from Ken Romaine at the Pro Arts NJ location long before we purchased.

    Great list, BTW.

    Steve B.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2008
  4. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Is one of them the DataCue?

    edit: DataCue was made by Teatronics, not Theatre Techniques, Inc. (TTI). Always got the two companies confused.

    Many of the above dates were from when I first encountered a console, so the introduction is certainly to be earlier.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2008
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    When was the "Micro-Star" introduced? and does it count? It was an Apple IIe based kit with lighting software, you could wire up to an analogue board, and make it into a CCC < computer controlled console>
     
  6. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    No, just the info as I posted. I really don't recall either of these units, only remembering a TTI unit that looked like the C-Tran ColorTrack and Kliegl Performer. Both of these TTI units [Edit: In the brochure I have] had separate CRT's - shown on their own rolling stands.

    ColorTrack was shown in the music video done by Phil Collins and Phillip Bailey - "She's an Easy Lover" - 1984, btw.

    Additionally, right around the into of the Kliegl (Thorn) Q-File was the baby brother - Q-Level, which used faders to build looks, then recorded. Also a Thorn unit.

    I'm away for a week or so, but will need to get these brochures scanned and e-mailed to you. Some cool stuff.

    SB
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2008
  7. Sean

    Sean Active Member

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    How about the Mantrix MX from Strand? Anyone use that one?

    I'm guessing it was released ~1992 or so.

    --Sean
     
  8. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Oh, c'mon, the Congo (Jr.) wasn't that bad that it's not even list-worthy.
     
  9. cdub260

    cdub260 CBMod CB Mods

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    I remember that system. Orange Coast College had one when I was a student there.
     
  10. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Yeah a lighting designer named Tony Nye and i installed one in the Tsa-La-Ghi theatre's board. It was 96 channels of Kleigel fun!:rolleyes:
     
  11. bdkdesigns

    bdkdesigns Active Member Fight Leukemia

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    I just used the Mantrix MX last year :) Luckily that space now runs on an ETC Express 48/96
     
  12. midgetgreen11

    midgetgreen11 Active Member

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    A guy I know/work with owns 3 GAM Access Boards, that he uses for parts to make one of them work. I think my school has run our last few shows off of them. Its a great little board.
     
  13. gaffer240

    gaffer240 Member

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    My first memory board was an EDI Troubadore 3, not sure the date but late 1980's or early 1990's. Installed on a nearby military base theatre.

    The next board was an ETC ACT 1.

    Both nice boards. Unfortunately, the Troubadore, being my first experience in memory boards, opened up an interesting problem. The house light where on the board and the could be recorded into cues. Rapidly learned blind editing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2008
  14. mbandgeek

    mbandgeek Active Member

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    Teatronics Producer II didn't make it on the list. It is from the early 90's. Its the first lighting board i've ever used.
     
  15. waynehoskins

    waynehoskins Active Member

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    Ah, me too. As limited as the thing is, I still like it. (Correction, though: it's from the mid-to-late '80s)

    But it's not so much a memory board as a memory-assisted manual board. No theatre stack or anything, but you did get proportional submasters and a proportional patch .. and 9 pages of patch-effect-submaster memory. When we did Joesph several years ago (essentially community theatre at the high school, who had the Pro2) I did the crossfading-submasters thing to get a semi-theatre-stack, and I ate up six pages of memory, including some effects.

    A year later I lit the first show at the high school that actually used a memory board: a rented Microvision FX. It was glorious not having to rely on the board op except to press the correct Go button.
     
  16. mbandgeek

    mbandgeek Active Member

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    oops... Our school was built in 1993 so i was assuming that it was a realitively new board. And i know what they say about people who assume. :oops:
     
  17. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I'm not, necessarily, anti-Teatronics, but:
    1. They are no longer in business [edit: I was wrong! see Home - www.teatronics.com ], and
    2. More importantly, they made no serious contribution to the advancement of memory control systems, other than to make them affordable and therefore accessible to some users.
    3. Other fine companies' offerings, primarily catering to the educational and lower-budget markets, did not make the list as well. No offense to them either, but their lack of importance, as well as the low quantities produced, earns them squarely in the "other" or "also ran" category.

    Not to stifle discussion of other consoles, of course. Around 1989 I ran a fully automated multi-media show using a Sunn lighting console, with full MIDI implementation (not MSC) of the lighting.
     
  18. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    1982. Would you like one? Trailing Edge Technologies, Inc.

    edit: The Master List now appears at http://www.controlbooth.com/forums/...-memory-lighting-control-systems-history.html. Feel free to make any additions, provided they are accurate.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2008
  19. Teatronics

    Teatronics Member

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    The MicroStar which ran on the Apple IIe was first introduced in 1982 and at one time was in 22% of every college and university in the United States. It was later replaced by the ProStar when the more powerful IBM pc came out. There are still a few active MicroStar installations today!

    by the Creator and Founder of MicroStar, ProStar and TechStar.
     
  20. dramatech

    dramatech Well-Known Member

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    Our theatre has an EDI "Omega" board, that has cue stacks and all of the features of an expression, only more awkward to operate. It can drive AMX- 192, DMX-512 and a strange combination of analog. The paperwork that I have indicates that it was purchased and installed in 1989. It still works after a few minor repairs, and we have loaned it to a college nearby for their student theatre.
     

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