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Mic goes for the nose dive

Discussion in 'Safety' started by renegadeblack, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

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    Last night one of our choirs had their showcase. They were trying to adjust their mics themselves (which we to some degree encourage) and the didn't tighten the yoke(?) and the mic stand took a complete nose dive. I (the light guy) get yelled at by the sound guy GOGOGOGOGOGO. V.V
     
  2. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    I believe you mean the clutch.
     
  3. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

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    Something along those lines, my light guy side is going to show :)

    It was one of those mic stands that has two parts, one that goes up and down, and one that goes side to side. Like are often used for guitars.
     
  4. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    A boom stand.
     
  5. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Warning: HIJACK ALERT.

    Interesting that when Audio uses the term "boom" or "boom arm," they are referring to the horizontal member, as on a crane, but when Lighting uses the term, they are referring to the vertical. I have found no evidence clearly indicating that the lighting term evolved from the word "boomerang," and think it's just as likely called a boom because that's the noise it makes when it falls over.

    /hijack
     
  6. ReiRei

    ReiRei Active Member

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    Wow...

    The principal at my high school threw our wireless mic onto the stage because he couldn't figure out to turn it on. Even though beforehand our sound guy should have turned it on.

    Why were you using a boom stand for choir people, if you don't mind my asking? I've only ever used them for instruments and for one pianist who wanted the microphone between her and the piano.
     
  7. loki

    loki Member

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    This is why at showcase we have sound guys in the wing who go onstage and position the mics for each individual number, it slows things down but cuts down the errors, Until we stuff it up....


    Indeed, that is a bit slack :p Personaly i always re-battery, Turn them on and Tape the controls (So no actors / musicians can mess with them)

    Boom stands can be rather effective on choirs, especialy if you have to alter the settings every scene, I have always found them very good if you have to have a flexible setup.
     
  8. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

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    We were using to booms a) because it's what we had and b) because we always have people playing the guitar, or in one of the showcases that night, 3.

    As for throwing the mic, one time way back in middle school in our cafetorium, they were doing auditions for a talent show. The gain is set on it so that it cuts out when people get too loud... obviously. This girl was singing and it kept cutting out on her. There was a person somewhere laughing (or so I heard) and she threw the mic as hard as she could on the floor and ran into the corner and started crying. Both the singer and the mic survived, surprisingly.
     

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