The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

Mic Tape for sweaty actors

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by Techie93, Jul 18, 2017.

  1. Techie93

    Techie93 Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fresno, CA
    I am currently working on a production. I have a few actors that are heavy sweaters. And the typical 3M Transpore tape doesn't stick well. Any suggestions on alternatives???
     
  2. Erik456

    Erik456 Member

    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Life on the Road
    Try 3M Tegaderm tape. It comes in larger patches, but cut it into strips as big as needed. Every tour I have been on, the audio dept uses that.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  3. themuzicman

    themuzicman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    885
    Likes Received:
    178
    Occupation:
    Audio Engineer
    Location:
    On Tour
    +1 for Tegaderm. I routinely work in a large outdoor venue and we buy bulk rolls of Tegaderm and cut it down into strips for our sweatiest actors. Some need a touch up at intermission, but usually it'll hold up through a full show in the summer heat.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  4. MRW Lights

    MRW Lights Active Member

    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    NYC
    I keep a box of "sweat proof" clear band-aids on hand, I've also found the standard clear band-aids to hold out a little longer as well. The problem with the 3m tape is that there are several versions made for several companies. Tegaderm and 3m branded Transpore tape are the real deal. that being said I often get by with the walgreens/duane reade, CVS, generic 3m first aid tape too.
     
  5. Daniel Fowler

    Daniel Fowler Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Georgia
    I am said sweaty actor, and I can tell you the only stuff that works for me is 3M Nexcare flexible clear tape. I think it's a surgical tape of some kind. I took a picture:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. NickVon

    NickVon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    603
    Likes Received:
    101
    Location:
    07003
    I buy my my 3m Transpore in bulk (12 rolls in a box) from Amazon and have had great luck with it. I use a variety of wig/lav elements taped to the cheek, and single ear ear-set style. It is important to note that the tape has to go on dry skin to start. a little toweling/ and Rubbing alcohol to clear of skin oils/sweat before placing the mic and tape is important. When time permits I mic actors before they have gotten into what ever hell the costume designer has put them in (like 3 piece wool suit.)

    Proper strain relief on the cable is also important. Tape cheek/or front of ear (depending on mic) Tape back of ear ( cheek/front of ear, behind ear are both places the muscles won't move the tape.) then if placing the mic on an actors right cheek, ask them to tiled there chin to the left and down stretch out the wire and a little piece of tape on the back of the neck, just in line with the shoulder horizon. (sometime if you have an actor with a large neck or neck folds and creases, ask them to tilt there head back and make a note of where the indents are, and don't place the neck tape where it will fall into a crease when the actor tilts his head up.

    Pieces of tape that are to big will span across muscles in the face/neck and back and actively work against the tape staying in place. I find small 1" by 1/2" to generally be a good size.

    If all else fails, during rehearsal, I go the little bit extra mile, and cut up small 1/4" by 3/4" pieces of double sided wig tape. and place them just under the locations I place the Transpore. I lay the mic on top, then tape over the mic and the wig tape with the Transpore. (this process takes a little bit more time once you get the hang of it, and another 5 minutes extra until you finger get used to dealing with the double sided wig/toupe tape.) I generally only need the double sided tape on the cheek/front of ear, and behind the ear in the instances.

    Ask the actor to roll there shoulders and turn the head far left, right, up, down, and ask them if they feel any tugging or pull on the wire. If they do fix it right then and then. Generally I've found that when they feel pulling on the piece behind the ear, it's because the tape on the neck didn't leave enough slack.

    Sometimes you'll still need to reapply during particularly intense shows with very active dancing or costume changes that may bump, or rub against the mic wire.

    I do many community theater, and semi-pro productions ranging from kids to adults and these are the tricks combined with other knowledge bases like these forums that have worked for me.

    Nick
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  7. themuzicman

    themuzicman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    885
    Likes Received:
    178
    Occupation:
    Audio Engineer
    Location:
    On Tour
    Adding on my last sweaty actor tip -- have the actors apply antiperspirant (not deodorant) to the areas the mic tape normally goes at bedtime. Antiperspirant needs time to seep into the skin, so application before they go to bed gives it the entire night to get to work. I typically have actors do this to their forehead if I'm getting too many sweated out mics.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  8. DrPinto

    DrPinto Active Member

    Messages:
    503
    Likes Received:
    78
    Location:
    USA
    KT Tape. It's available at most pharmacies. Sticks to the sweatiest actor.
     
  9. Andrew Johns

    Andrew Johns Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    Technical Director
    Location:
    OH
    Transderm tape works just fine if you use a Skin-Prep protective wipe before the tape. It applies a waterproof barrier directly to the skin. Just wipe it on the area you want to tape (looks just like a handi-wipe), wave your hand over the area for a few seconds, then tape away! I got mine at a local Pharmacy that also supplies hospitals. It also available at Amazon. The brand is smith&nephew Skin-Prep. Worked extremely well on a recent production of Shrek I worked on. Both Shrek and Donkey were sweating buckets, literally (Shrek had to pour out the sweat from his vinyl rubber hood after each show). The tape never let go, neither on the cheek nor the back of the neck. The barrier the wipes leave on the skin actually bonds itself to the skin, but is easily washed off with soap and water and is non-toxic. Hospital supply stores, gotta lov'em!
     
    TimmyP1955 likes this.
  10. Andrew Johns

    Andrew Johns Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    Technical Director
    Location:
    OH
    Also, use small strips of moleskin around the mic capsule to allow the sweat to be absorbed before dripping into mic.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  11. wolf825

    wolf825 Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

    Messages:
    1,155
    Likes Received:
    93
    Location:
    Eastcoast USA
    FWIW I use Topstick or Toupee Tape (search for Hairdirect .com for cheap good sticking tape strips) for exceptionally sweaty actors - since toupee tape is typically double sided I then cover the top sticky side with normal transpore. Toupee tape is extremely strong durable tape that can withstand sweat and heavy use applications. It is also hypoallergenic and easy to remove with no residue or solvent needed. A variation of this technique if you don't want to wet up the mic or cable against the skin is to apply the toupee tape square to the face, apply the mic cable to the top sticky side, and then cover that with Transpore - making a sandiwch of toupee tape, cable and transpore tape. As others have said - Tegaderm is also very useful but requires a bit of prep and is also a bit expensive.

    -wolf
     
  12. JTMcQuay

    JTMcQuay Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    I recently did a community theatre production of Evil Dead and we had to contend with not just sweaty actors... but also "blood" and such running down their faces... we tried several of the usual tapes... ultimately we ended up using Opsite Flexifix, which is made to hold things like IV tubes and medical devices on patients... it comes in many sizes up to sheets which can be cut size.
    We used a 2" wide roll, though I might try 2.5" wife in the future.

    As additional protection, we found a product called SkinTac Liquid Adhesive which we used as a primer of sorts on the actors skin. It's applied in a light layer and allowed to dry. It then provides a barrier against sweat which the tape (even transpore or other tapes) can stick to even better.

    Both products must be applied to dry skin... and we noticed a definite difference of makeup was applied before the skintac and/or tape. Alcohol swabs before application can help remove oil and as it evaporates it can help cool the skin and prevent light perspiration during application.
     

    Attached Files:

    RonHebbard likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice