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Mini PARs ?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by JSFox, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. JSFox

    JSFox Active Member

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    I need 4 - 6 mini PARs (2" or 3") to put on the lip of our stage to cast some shadows for a candlelite scene. At shows I've seen MR16 versions as well as other lamp types. Any experience with these? Work well? Recommendations? Source?

    Thanks,
     
  2. Diarmuid

    Diarmuid Active Member

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    I've had some experience with these and have got to say, I think they are absolutley great. They are really useful, for uplighting, and are obviously (due to their size) easy to fit into small spaces in the set.

    Depending on what exact type of shadows you want, I would expect some MR16 Pars to work fine, I have seen them used from the side and below, but I haven't tried it, and dont really think they would work from above, due to the intensity and spill.

    I don't know about any supply places in the US, but I would guess that most decent places would stock them, if you are looking for them in the UK I would think that someone like White-Light or Stage-Electrics would stock them.

    One pratical thing is, that the MR16s operate on 12V, so you will need to use transformers, or wire them in a circuit, but I think the wiring in circuit only works in the UK, where you can wire them in a series of 20, if you are lucky enough to have that many:)

    Anyway, I hope that has been enough and of some help.

    Diarmuid
     
  3. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    There are several versions of the "MR16" type lamp, lamp with reflector attached in a mini size one is a JP something or other. anyway the other versions operate directly off 120 so no need to transformer them. At tleast here in the colonies. :)
     
  4. drawstuf99

    drawstuf99 Active Member

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    I know that I've used some "birdies," aka: Par 16's that are the size you're talking about. I got two that are just ordered off of MusiciansFriend.com ( i forget the brand, but they're the only ones you can get there) and they are actually really good. They use high quality halogen lamps and produce a lot of light.

    I've also used those made by "ProCan" which are equally as good. They're great for up light on the front of the stage and, as mentioned, putting into little nooks in the set. The one's I've used have all been on ericson plugs, but I just got an adapter for each of them and plugged them into electrics. Very useful.

    Somehow, those always find their way into my shows. Actually, the show I'm doing doesnt have them - oh no! hehe.
     
  5. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    We use a different fixture for these purposes - the inky. 3" fresnel. They work great and cast awesome shadows. We just had a touring show of the Canturbury Tales come through that used 3 of them for casting shadows on the back wall, and they worked great. Slightly more expensive, but also puts out 100W of light and is easily changed from spot to flood. We're also using three of them in the nooks of our set for Spring Awakening, one in the grave and two in the barn/loft.
     
  6. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    These are what we use.

    [​IMG]

    They ship in aluminum finish as shown or black with line cord and plug, medium screw socket and gel frame. We have found 150w halogen bulbs to use in them, however gel life is not too good and the fixture will get hot.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2006
  7. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    2nd bill there... Production advantage sells mr16's for $18 and the lamp will run you around 10. They are made by american DJ. You can get a variety of floods in your lamp. I usually go with the 75w version due to burn out (they burn out anything even remotly saturated QUICK). Inkies are also very nice if you have the extra money to spend.
     
  8. mbandgeek

    mbandgeek Active Member

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    have you thought about making the pars yourself?
     
  9. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    I’m a big fan of using Inkies (3" Fresnels) normally but the PAR 16 “Birdie” when low voltage or PAR 16 or PAR 20 when line voltage are also useful or cheaper at times. GAM also sells the “Nook Light” that’s a curious stickup fixture useful at times. A few types of track light fixture are also line or low voltage plus small be it MR-16 or wash light, and adaptable from track light plug to Edison plug.

    Any theatrical supply or lighting company will be able to sell one brand or another or this type of fixture. Lots of makers of the fixture out there.

    Bill, I note Norman lamps sells a 150JDR/MR-16 lamp but no other brands. My interest is peaked, what brand are your lamps and do they melt down the wiring faster or work well? Get lots of crew chiefs asking for brighter lamps, just have not bought any yet.

    In general for an Inkie, the Altman #100 3" Fresnel fixture is the normal fixture used in the industry. It’s on paper rated for a 100 Watt ESR lamp, Altman stands by the more normal use of a 150w ETC lamp instead. 150 Watt is about the standard for the industry. Such lamps go down to 35w. Other companies sell 3" Fresnels that will take up to a 250w lamp.

    On Birdies, they are nice and small but the line voltage version is perhaps more useful. Where I work uses PAR 20 fixtures with the medium screw based MR-16 lamps in them. Just about as small a fixture, a little wider beam angle is possible. Avoid if you go PAR-16 or PAR-20 fixture the intermediate screw (E-17) based lamp. Very limited lamp options available for the fixture and often hard to find lamps locally.
     
  10. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Ship,

    I miss-typed last night. We have a 100w halogen MR16 with medium screw base, not a 150w. The Q100MR16 is available in 10, 18 and28 degree beam spreads with lumen ratings of 8500, 4500, and 3000 respectfully.
     
  11. JSFox

    JSFox Active Member

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    Thanks for everyone's input. Ordered 6 James Thomas 'Birdies' this morning.

    BTW, there is a 150w MR16 called an EZK. We use some in track lites in our shop. Be careful not to melt your fixtures though.
     
  12. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    The EZK lamp has a G5.3/4.8 / FLAT PINS base which won't work in a medium screw fixture.
     
  13. Pie4Weebl

    Pie4Weebl Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    so those mini frenels are called inkies? I just saw some of those at a Fray concert in Chicago on monday night, they packed a lot of punch.
     
  14. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Inkies is a cinematic term for them. Love working on movies, had to learn all sorts of new names for the same gear I had been using for years. I've often thought about compiling a list of terminology for production equipment that was organized by region. Interesting one, I learned the term "Rain Light" as a par36 lamp fixture, moved out here and the L.D. I was working with called them pinspots, whereas I learned a pinspot was a 3.5" leko.
     
  15. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Here's what I've been told, but it's probably all different from venue to venue.

    Birdie - PAR16 fixture
    Inkie - 3" fresnel
    Rainlight and/or Pinspot - narrow-beam PAR-36 fixture

    About the Inkie bulbs. We have 150W inkie bulbs, but for our current show (spring awakening), we're using all 100W bulbs because all of the fixtures are attached to 2x4 stock. Which I should probably fireproof. *makes mental note*

    Oh yeah, I'm light op for the show, and should get some good pics of the rehearsal on sunday, and will get some more activity on the show pics topic.
     
  16. Pie4Weebl

    Pie4Weebl Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    yeah the term rainlight always through me off for a bit. When I was a high schooler I would work every so often with college kids who would change up the names which took a beat. Lets see what can I add to the list.

    Stage pin/slip
    legs-border/ tormentor-teaser
    softgoods/ curtains
    wings/ staging area

    We ought make a large list as a forum.
     
  17. JSFox

    JSFox Active Member

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    In my world some of those were different things.

    Legs & Borders are upstage and soft, Tormentors & Teasers are downstage, often against the proscenium and usually hard.

    Curtains are a form of softgood. A scrim or a cyc is also softgood, but not curtain.

    Wings are the spaces within the legs, staging area is offstage of the wings.

    During the victorian era 'legs' was bad. Even piano legs were covered lest they cause some errant guy to lust and woe be upon the person who spoke the word 'leg'. Wonder what they called 'em back then?

    Now, without looking it up, who knows where the term 'limelight' came from and what GOBO stands for?
     
  18. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure that the limelight thing comes from old lights that used the substance Lime (calcium oxide or somethin' like that) with a hot flame on it to produce light. I have no idea about the gobo thing, though.
     
  19. Pie4Weebl

    Pie4Weebl Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I used to know both of those at one time!
     
  20. DarSax

    DarSax Active Member

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    Yarr, the old lights used actual lime to phosphoresce and be bright and stuff. If I remember correctly.
     

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