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MIPRO Mics - Good or Bad

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by mcgart, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. mcgart

    mcgart Member

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    I am currently looking at purchasing some Mipro Wireless Microphone systems. I am interested to know what other members think of Mipro as a brand to buy and also of any experiences people have had with them. I am drawn to them because of there good balance in price and quality...any views greatly appreciated
     
  2. jbeutt

    jbeutt Active Member

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    How do you know they're high quality? If you do already, why come here and ask?

    I've never heard of these and they appear to be a cheapo knockoff sort of brand, but that's just my impression. Unless someone else here can vouch for them, I suggest just renting a small package and running them through some tests.
    Considering the company and manufacturing is in Asia, I'd be concerned that they're simply reverse engineering (read copying on the cheap) better products, like Behringer does.
    Good luck, though. What sort of accessibility do you have to reputable equipment like Shure and Sennheiser?
     
  3. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    I've read alot of good reviews of them from fairly reputable sources. The ACT-707 series is the only one that they ever rate, probably indicating that the others are far inferior. I really like the looks of the 4-pack rackspace unit of ACT-707 recievers, but I've never used them. I'd get the Mipro recievers, but since they have a TAF-4 connector, get Countryman mics to go with them.
     
  4. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Mipro I do believe is NOT a knockoff, though I may be wrong. For what it is worth, these days, Beyerdynamic Radio Mics are just rebadged Mipro systems.

    A word of caution with reference to soundlight's recommendations. Just because two products from different manufacturers have the same connection is absolutely NO guarantee that they are wired the same... So I would check that very carefully before I connected anything...

    Mipro ain't all that bad but it ain't that great either.
     
  5. mcgart

    mcgart Member

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    I have used them before and I have found them to be good...but considering I'm new at this I thought I would get some views from more experienced people. The only reason I'm am considering choosing these over brands like Shure is because of the cost factor - our school isn't willing to spend heaps on this product. We rent MIPRO mics every year and I have never had any trouble with them, but just because I haven't doesn't mean others haven't. We are also in a school environment where these mics would get heavy use, so I would rather not have expensive Shure equipment being tossed around.
     
  6. jbeutt

    jbeutt Active Member

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    Being in a heavy use environment would be my exact reasoning for getting a more expensive Shure or Senn product. I wouldn't want to continually be replacing units because they can't stand up to that kind of use.
    I suppose it comes down to user experience. In a high-use environment with professionals, I would trust that frequent use wouldn't result in broken units more than should be expected. Students and amateurs are going to bring back a lot more broken units, no matter the quality.
    But as we all know, if the money isn't there, it isn't there and we have to be creative. That's why we get paid the big bucks. ;)
    If it's really a budget crunch, and the users are students and not pros, then I would try to figure out alternative micing methods because going cheap in that environment is going to mean broken equipment. There aren't really alternatives to wireless if you're doing musicals, but there are other budgetary options like:
    1)Buying half of what you need of higher quality and supplementing with rentals
    2)Buying a small amount of good quality for leads and get the rest in cheaper microphones.
    3)Figuring out sharing schemes of units for shows among characters. This one is hard to plan in advance though and would probably result in harder treatment of the units.

    I would still, at the very least, buy just a few, continuing to rent the rest for a few shows time. Then you get some idea how these things will hold up, since what you've been getting are rentals and (hopefully) maintained or replaced at the shop. There may be problems you haven't seen, but your rental house knows about and is covering.
     
  7. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I have used that brand a few times in the past, and they actually sound fairy decent if you replace the mics. They have nice user controls, and fit in a very small area, and don't suck batteries. Quality wise the packs are decently made, though not bullet proof like most sennheisers. What application do you want to use them for?
     
  8. mcgart

    mcgart Member

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    We don't have heavy use of them but when they do get used they are in the hands of students - so they are handled quite badly. We would normally use them several times a week for assemblies and lectures, plus at various drama nights throughout the year. They receive the most use in the three productions we stage each year - high usage over a period of three weeks each time. They would generally be used for speaking (lecturing and dialogue in plays) and also for musical performances (vocals). I am looking for something general so we can float them over all these categories - high quality sound that rivals professionals isn't essential. We are looking for something that will sound alright and not break the budget.
     
  9. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I think they would be fairly good for you. In the "not break the bank" category they do rather well, and they are much better then telex or others like it. The only real gripe I have about them is the construction of the packs.
     
  10. jbeutt

    jbeutt Active Member

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    See and that's the issue with budgeting and buying equipment. It's not as easy as just meeting an immediate budget, but calculating down the road as well. This is something people don't do very often and why often, in the long run, people spend a lot more than they need to. Churches and schools are the primary victims of this kind of spending as they have a hard time conceptualizing long term budgets and the frequent necessity of spending more up front so as to spend less down the road.
    This is really general advice as I've never worked with the mics you're looking at, but if construction is a question then it's a factor to consider. Also, remember that lavs will break and are an expendable, so you need to have extra on hand as well as be prepared to buy more. Then there are batteries.

    I would do several budget scenarios. One of simply X channels (pack and receiver) of your Mipro and 1.2-1.5 times the number of channels in microphone elements.
    Then do several different totals that take into account different repair/replacement scenarios over time.
    This whole thing should end up looking like a table with time on one axis and repairs on the other.
    Now calculate buying the same system, but of a higher quality brand/construction. If the whole system stays intact for two years where the other would loose a few units after one, is there an advantage?

    Also do some calculations for different rental/buying combinations. Maybe it's cheaper to buy a couple units to use year round and rent the rest at those busy times.

    Ultimately it's going to be subjective to the person writing the check and in my experience, bureaucratic organizations don't understand long term budgets and would rather continually spend smaller amounts replacing and repairing then shelling out for a dependable setup.
     
  11. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Very true, but the OP asked if they were good mics, and they are. I know we all want ULX's but sometimes thats not what the budget has in mind for us. These mics will do what they want them to do, and if cared for properly will last a long time. If the OP is concerned about the mic packs falling apart due to abuse, I would go with sennheiser because they offer a metal pack for a fairly inexpensive price. But like anything, if they are taken care of, they will last.
     
  12. mcgart

    mcgart Member

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    You've hit the issue dead on. Our school isn't well known for being generous when it comes to money, and trust me, I've tried many times to convince them of the benefit of buying quality equipment in order to avoid costs later on. However, they're more interested in the smallest possible upfront cost and don't consider later costs. I would love to buy high quality systems like Shure but realistically I don't think it will happen. That's when Mipro came up - I know many have said that it's not worthwhile buying a crap system like Mipro but considering we're more than likely to end up buying them, wanted to get some opinions on them. Having described our usage in an earlier post, I believe Mipro will suit our needs adequately.
     
  13. TechiGoz

    TechiGoz Active Member

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    The experiences I've had with the Mipro products are also quite good. Sure, its not a Shure or Senn but for what it is, it does the job pretty darn well. I've hired in Mipro mics for productions simply because of budget restrictions. They seem to do the job fine.

    Mcgart, it seems that the school you are with is like ones i have worked with aswell. Tight/restricted budgets, slightly stingy, no understanding. But sometimes in the industry, thats what you gotta work with. Mipro 707 series are pretty good, both from reviews i've read and experience i've had.
     
  14. mcgart

    mcgart Member

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    As you mentioned sennheiser had a metal pack, would it be worthwhile buying the Mipro mics with the metal packs - I know they have them and there's nothing different technically except for the metal packs.

    I'm glad some other people have had positive experiences with them and also that they understand the budget issues we have. Previous posts have said that there a good brand if you replace the mics with something different - is this neccessary? I don't want to buy Mipro packs with a different brand of mic and find they don't work...
     
  15. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    There is almost no chance of that happening, unless they have the wrong connectors.
    They are listed on a German language website as a 4 pin mini XLR, it looks like it might a variation on the connector Shure uses, but with a threaded ring added.
     
  16. dvlasak

    dvlasak Active Member

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    Accoring to a web site I found doing a google search, these MIPRO units aren't that cheap. For not that much more money you could have a mid- upper level Shure or Senn. I'd do more research before you decide that you can't afford better.
    I also work for a school, and yes money is tight. But my experience is that in the long run, it is cheaper to buy a better wireless than a cheap unit. Out side of replacing mics (which you should figure as consumables), alll my Shure products have been trouble free. I suggest slowly building up your inventory of better quality units.
    Also, make sure you are aware of any inter mod problems that could exist in your area. As more and more digital TV stations go on air, we have fewer and fewer frequencies available to us. Check out the FCC website. There also is finder on the Senn. website that is pretty good.

    Dennis
     
  17. SHARYNF

    SHARYNF Well-Known Member

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    Personally unless you can get a real deal, I don't see a great savings, like others have mentioned. There are a lot of dealers who are really agressive with Shure and Senn pricing, so the cost diff might not be all that much

    Sharyn
     
  18. Jim_L

    Jim_L Member

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    Our theatre has been using Mipro mikes for about 7 years now. We've had no problems with them except for a ripped out mike wire, and a broken case door. All parts are replaceable.

    We have one single receiver, and four dual receivers run into two 4-channel antenna dividers. I can't remember the model numbers off the top of my head, but they are UHF frequency. Someone took out the nicad batteries and threw them away, so we've been using akline batteries. they last about two shows before they have to be changed.

    I did sound for another theatre that had all Shure mikes, Mipro out performed them. And I liked the sound quality better. When I was DJing, My wireless was a handheld Mipro. I loved it, never had a problem with it.

    Hope this helps. Jim
     
  19. mcgart

    mcgart Member

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    Thanks Jim - it helps a lot. (matches the limited experiences I have had whilst using Mipro)

    Others have said there isn't much price difference between the Mipro and Shure/Senn units. This however hasn't been what I've experienced when getting quotes on Mipro Units. I have sourced getting four base stations with 2 handheld mics and two headworn mics for $1700 US dollars. This has proved to have a significant price difference over a Shure setup of the same specifications. However this may come down to suppliers I've seen but I don't think so.
     
  20. stjc15

    stjc15 Member

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    I know very well the tight school budget situation. However, that hasn't stopped our school from buying already 6 Shure ULX series Systems with handheld and Bodypack microphones. The key to this was purchasing two a year, not all at once. We have another two that will be comming next year. Also, don't just settle for the price of a specific company. Call various companies and get some bids. If there is a company that you are comforatble buying from, and another comapny gives you a lower bid, they will more that likely give you a lower bid to keep your business. Just because they list a price under the list price doesn't mean it is the lowest they will go. Just some suggestions.
     

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