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multi-cable

Discussion in 'Wiki' started by icewolf08, Mar 19, 2009.

  1. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Occupation:
    Controls Technician - TAIT Towers
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    Lititz, PA
    Multi-cable is a term that is used to refer to any multi-conductor cable.

    Most often it is used to refer to 12/14 (12AWG, 14 conductor) or 12/18 (12AWG, 18 conductor) cable terminated with Socapex-compatible connectors. These cables are capable of carrying six circuits. When using 12/14 cable, all of the ground pins (#13-18) in the 19-pin Socapex-type connector are tied together to conductors 13 & 14 inside the connector. With 12/18 cable, all pins in the connector are wired to individual conductors.

    Multi-cable with Socapex-style connectors (courtesy of Lex Products):
    [​IMG]

    Less common is the 12-circuit type which uses 37-pin Pyle-National StarLine connectors and 12/37 cable, providing a discreet conductor for the hot, neutral, and ground of each circuit.

    Getting circuits into a multi is generally accomplished in one of two ways.
    One can use a Break-In, which has six male connectors of the user's choice that are wired into one female Socapex connector that mates with its male counterpart on the cable.
    The other option is to have Socapex outputs (female) on the dimmer rack/pack or ML PD.

    To get your circuits out of the multi requires some form of Break-Out. Some breakouts are built like a drop-box, some are just the reverse of a break-in with six female connectors of choice wired to a male Socapex connector.

    The term multi-cable can also be used to refer to the multi-conductor cable used to feed a connector strip. These cables vary in the number of conductors, and are typically hardwired into the dimming system and into the raceways. In this application, the term Borderlight Cable is often used, regardless of whether borderlights are actually involved.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2010

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