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Multimedia in Anne Frank

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by arik52, Dec 4, 2008.

  1. arik52

    arik52 Member

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    I'm currently in the process of designing the set for the Diary of Anne Frank, and my high school has decided that we would like to incorporate multimedia into the show (for when Anne's words are seen on the stage or we see soldiers marching in the streets, for those who know the show).

    My question is: what do I need to incorporate into the set for the multimedia to be projected on?

    Would any sort of wall that is already built into the set suffice, or would paint treatment and angles interfere with that? I would love to avoid an actual screen in the set - using a wall would be much better. If the walls of the set do not suffice, would incorporating a black wall work? I'd hate to have a random white wall on stage, though a black wall could easily disappear from view when not in use. Suggestions?
     
  2. lieperjp

    lieperjp Well-Known Member

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    I'm not a set designer or a projectionist, but I would think that you use white fabric, and then when not need it, remove it? Not knowing what your set design is, I couldn't say. Maybe even then, you could do rear projection.

    Also, I know they make special white paint designed to be projected on, but I don't remember where to find it. If you're interested, I'm sure someone else can point you to a place to purchase.
     
  3. Grog12

    Grog12 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Because I've been uber artsy fartsy lately and les technical.....

    But it depends on the effect you're going for. Is a recording of the words going to be playing in the background? Does the audience have to be able to ready the words? Could you hang a supertitle screen? What else is happening on stage at the same time? Are you trying to cover a scene change? A long ass costume change? Yes you can project onto black...but do you want a random black wall anymore than a random white wall? How will the projector get doused or are you all fine with projected black during parts without any titles?

    These are questions that must have answers before we can point you in the right direction.
     
  4. willbb123

    willbb123 Active Member

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    At my high school we did the show "And then they came for me" which is the story of Ann Frank.
    It took me forever to find these pics...
    www.reginaphotos.com- powered by SmugMug
    you really cant see it well but we got a projection screen that you could rear project on and then put the projector as far back as we could get it. If your interested I can tell you how I ran cable from the projector to the booth. And make sure any media you get is on the computer or on a dvd not a VHS.:rolleyes:
     
  5. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Yes, you can project onto black... but you have to have a very beafy projector, around the 3k-4k range in lumen output. I did this for a show earlier this year, and it worked rather well, but I was shooting onto an 8'x6' screen. Also, the content was made to be shot onto black, most content is not. You might look at doing some rear projection, or something of that nature. Also, take a look at the projector you want to use. Most school districts don't own a projector bright enough to fight stage lights. An off the shelf powerpoint projector will not do what you want it to do.
     
  6. arik52

    arik52 Member

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    No, the audience doesn't necessarily have to read the words. These projections will be mostly occurring during quieter moments on stage - not to cover any changes. There are no scene/costume changes in the show; the entire cast stays on stage in the same area the entire time. A random black wall wouldn't be visible really, it would blend into the black of the back of the stage. The set consists of three different levels staggered throughout the stage, not directly on top of each other, and a white area in the midst of it wouldn't be good. If that's the only way to do it, I would try to incorporate it into the design to ensure cohesion between the projection area and the set. I assume the projector will be "doused" by covering it with a lens cap - there will not be projections at all times. I don't know, I won't be on the team doing the actual multimedia work.

    An example of why we would use these projections are the following stage directions: (She lies down, goes to sleep as, from a distance, marching feet approach. Close, closer. From the street, the Nazi "Horst-Wessel-Song": "Die Fahne hoch!/Die Reihern fest geschlossen!/SA, marschiert mit ruhig festem Schritt!..." builds to a crescendo. The earsplitting sound of a train whistle. A train rushing by.) Obviously the stage directions could be removed for our production; however, the Director has decided that she would like to include them.

    Also, what does rear projection allow that regular projection doesn't?
     
  7. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    A place to put your projector to allow you to shoot at a normal angle and not have to keystone yourself to death.
     
  8. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    I think the coolest trick would be rear projection. You can have an area of the set made from rear projection material. Then at the appropriate moment it magically becomes a projection screen. No one sees the projection. It's easy to have someone douse the light since the projector can't be seen. It's just a really nice effect. The only negative is that the projection fabric and projector may be out of your budget. Depending on how good of a projector your school has.
     
  9. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    Don't use the lens cap. The heat from the lamp will melt it in a short amount of time. However, check the threads for do it yourself projector dousers.

    Rear projection will allow you more flexibility with your image. Since you will likely not have image mapping capability (like a Hippotizer can do where you blank out the areas that you don't want an image), you will not be limited to a standard projection area, the rest of the set can block the projection. Also, you will not have to worry about projecting on the performers or other set pieces. Another bonus is you are less likely to need to fly the projector (a major hassle).

    When you are using rear projection, the image is passing through the medium which can give you a "brighter" image in that you are not competing with your theatrical lighting as much. This is very dependent on the medium that you are using, rear projection screens are designed to do this, muslin is not (works more as a front projection surface). Spandex, available in many colors, is often used as a good substitute for a rear projection screen. Combined with a translucent paint you might be able to more easily hide the "screen". This will take some experimentation to find the appropriate material and paint. As with anything that you don't have experience with, make sure to give yourself the time and flexibility to learn and try different options.
    This last statement of course does not apply to things like rigging, pyro, or those other things that can be threatening to life and limb, because if you don't know what you're doing with that then you shouldn't be doing it!
     
  10. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    Great advice from our resident projectionist... except you don't want to use paint you want to use dye. It would be best to just buy some spandex in a color that works for you. If you can't find any then dye would be a possible alternative but it will still reduce the light that passes through.
     

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