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Musical

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by rw23, Mar 31, 2004.

  1. rw23

    rw23 Member

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    We just got a new ETC System at School and a brand new auditorium. We have an Express 48/96 and I know quite a bit about it now. We are now attempting to do a musical. Does anyone have any tips on lighting the musical? We have a bunch of ETC PARnels.

    Thanks
     
  2. thorin81

    thorin81 Active Member

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    What is the musical? That becomes the first priority. Remember, the lights and the sound are just like an exrtra character in the show. They both have just as much influence as the actual actors do.

    Let us know what the show is and then the ideas will come flowing in.
    Godspeed!!! :wink:
     
  3. rw23

    rw23 Member

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    Thanks for the reply.

    The Musical is WORKING
     
  4. Source4Spike

    Source4Spike Member

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    Location:
    Norm J. Pattiz Hall, Hamilton Academy of Music, Lo
    Hmm, Ive never heard of that one...could you maybe tell us a few things about it?
    -Nick
     
  5. zac850

    zac850 Well-Known Member

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    Questions:

    What is the plot?

    What are the themes?

    What are the moods?

    What are the effects?

    These four questions should help a lot in the light plot and what colors you gell the lights/angles and everything else...
     
  6. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Debatable. See past debates on the subject. On the other hand and especially in musicals, you kind of need to see the person singing in a brighter light and following light than the rest of the stage so as both to let the audience hear because what they can't see they won't hear, and so as such simple folk can by way of forcing their eyes attacted to what's most bright on stage, can focus on the talent intended to be focused on. Also the eyes of the performer are the key to lighting. If they are doing their job in acting much less singing in a role, than their eyes will be a major focus in telling the audience it's live not Memorex.
     
  7. TechnicalDirector3-W

    TechnicalDirector3-W Member

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    I believe the musical "WORKING" is about the work force and what it is all like. :roll:
     
  8. JasonC77

    JasonC77 Member

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    Frankly, I would light it like any other theatrical work. I dont nessisarily buy into the Musical = bright thing because there are a ton of musicals that are not happy/campy collections of tunes about the sunshine and love and flowers.

    One thing i do suggest is that if there is a lot of dance in the production, to make sure you give yourself plenty of sidelight (IE: heads, mids, and shins). being able to sculpt the body during dance heavy portions is important... regardless of the mood of the show.
     
  9. mbenonis

    mbenonis Wireless Guy Administrator Premium Member

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    You're lucky to have such a nice light board. We also have a 48/96 and I love it (even though I'm more of a sound person).
     
  10. Les

    Les Well-Known Member

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    I love lighting musicals because I feel like I can express my creativity in ways that are different from any play. For the logistics in lighting a musical, try to use a light pink/no color blue mix for your front lighting. Use a light amber or pink in your toplights... This will give you a warm wash with nice, natural tints. The pinks will bring out the skin tones, and make the costumes appear more vibrant. Also, be sure to make good use of your followspots if you have them. For your dance numbers, fade in more colors like pinks blues, etc... I usually try to avoid greens. Basically you just need to sit in on a rehearsal and 'feel' the songs. Then you can begin your creative process. "Working" is a musical with alot of explosive lighting potential, so think outside of the box.
     
  11. Smatticus

    Smatticus Active Member

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    I don't know if any of the things I just added to the post about the last show our high school did, also a musical, might help?
    http://www.controlbooth.com/postp7111.html#7111

    I agree with Lester's comments about creativity; for the show I had some fun playing around with gobos and fade times and colors. I had some fun in the sewer scene, I had a light focused right at where they gamblers were going to hold up Sky as he throws his dice at the end of the song; right at the point in the music the special flashes on and everything else goes out in a .2 second fade followed a second later by a quick fade to black. It was just a fun, dramatic way to end the song and the scene. :lol:
     

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