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Networking?

Discussion in 'General Advice' started by gremlin1287, Apr 20, 2005.

  1. gremlin1287

    gremlin1287 Member

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    With the continuing integration of computer technologies and lighting and sound, would you say that, in general, it would be an advantage to have a networking certification such as the CCNA certification, or would it be fine to not have one.

    I am asking this because I am currently Enrolled in a CCNA certification course. While I am technically meeting the minimum requirements for the certification, I am not doing as well as I would like to be, and it is negatively affecting my GPA.

    I have already decided that I would like to go into technical theatre as a career and am in the process of looking at colleges that offer majors in this area.

    I am contemplating not enrolling in semesters 3+4. (In fact the only reason I am in semester 2 is because i feel it will somehow be beneficial in the long run.)

    Any advice as to how beneficial this certification would be. Much thanks in advance.
     
  2. koncept

    koncept Active Member

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    i am net+, mcp, mcdst, and working on my ccna. with what i have seen in technical theater, i would go for the net+, it covers basic computers repair, maintenance, and fault tolerance along with basic networking.

    the ccna is for people who, im my opinion want to work on corporate networks installing and configuring switches and routers with advanced configurations. so far all networking i have seen has been very simple and something you could do with out the course. i would be glad to help you along the way if you are seriously interested in earning a ccna, or any of the others i have.
     
  3. dvsDave

    dvsDave Benevolent Dictator Administrator Senior Team CB Mods Fight Leukemia

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    I am working thru my MCSE right now... about to take my first test to become an MCP.

    it's not an easy set of tests... the windows XP one is ridiculously hard... the trick to to think which answer microsoft would pick.
     
  4. bdesmond

    bdesmond Active Member

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    CCNA is way more hardcore on the network level skills than you're going to need dealing with any lighting/sound equipment. At most, with today's equipment, at least, you give it an IP, punch int eh subnet, and the gateway. You're not going to be dealing with some inter-vlan routing issue on your 6513s, or a 12000 series carrier switch, or how to setup redundant vtp trunks in a full mesh core, or some such other hardcore business.

    Cisco cert tests compared to MS are way harder. I've been through all the MCSE for Windows 2003, along with the additional tests to get the Messaging endorsement. Took me a couple weeks to take them all - took em all based on practical experience. In my opinion they were pretty straightforward, certainly if you read the official MS book for the test they're easy enough.

    CCNA/CCNP/CCIE cert stuff is not real high on my todo list. I know enough to tell the network guys what I want on the switch/router, or if i really have to go in and tinker with the gear. I'm pretty happy in that bracket right now, at least.
     
  5. gremlin1287

    gremlin1287 Member

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    I think that since it's negatively affecting my GPA and since from your responses I wouldn't need that hardcore of a certification that I probably will not enroll in semesters 3+4.

    Thank you all for your input.


    Now that I think about it, I always have been into programming more than networking.
     

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