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New Light Source Technology from Elation?!

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by rsmentele, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. rsmentele

    rsmentele Active Member Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    Van likes this.
  2. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Wow! I just read a paper about this technology. Fascinating.
     
  3. rsmentele

    rsmentele Active Member Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    Sounds like most of us here in the US wont get to see this until MAYBE LDI.... Sad Face
     
  4. Quillons

    Quillons Member

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    @Van Can you link the paper?
     
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
  6. wheat

    wheat Member

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    Eventually someone - apparently - came out with a LARP system!

    Frankfurt saw the first units a couple of years ago, I'm sure about Claypaky presenting a concept light (with a huge front lens) and at least another producer as well.

    I've seen a demo of this technology something like 3 years ago, it was pretty stunning to see the amount of light emitted by such a small source (althought at the time it was a prettty yellowish beam, almost useless to us).

    The idea is that of having multiple arrays of blue laser diodes collimating to the same point , a wheel covered with different phosphors is than spinning extremely fast (to mix the different hues created by the different phosphors) to convert the blue to white.
    The refresh rate is given by the wheel's speed, so it could be interesting to see how this performs with HD cams and slow motions / close ups. Maybe the future will see versions with multiple wheels to increase such rate.

    It is pretty scalable and - theorically - the efficiency of the system is not affected by the rated power. More diodes --> more light and more current needed.

    Compared to "normal" LEDs we are not in the solid state world anymore, but we anyway have a lot of motors and wheels moving around it should not be a big problem.
     
  7. GreyWyvern

    GreyWyvern Apollo Staff

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    Hey @DELO72. They were a couple fancy lights in your booth at LDI last year. What were those? I thought they were laser.
     
  8. DELO72

    DELO72 Well-Known Member

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    We showed something we called "PHASER" for PHospher + lASER. It's pretty much as Wheat describes above. For the low powered ones such as are used in high-end vehicles as "super high beams", it's just a blue laser diode hitting phosphor to create a narrow beam of light. For the higher powered ones, the energy of the laser is such that a static phosphor would burn up too fast, so it has to go on a spinning wheel, and be a ceramic-based, high temperature phosphor to survive the intense energy being driven at it. Gaps in the phosphor give you blue laser. different phosphors give the ability to project different colors, and how you synchronize the laser pulses and the spinning of the wheel allows you to blend the different colors coming out to achieve (visually) a color in between.
     
  9. GreyWyvern

    GreyWyvern Apollo Staff

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    That's right, I remember now. Pretty cool stuff!
     
  10. wheat

    wheat Member

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    Well, I hadn't taken into account that the version I saw at the time was a single colour one...

    How should we call such a color mixing system? It's not properly additive nor subtractive, if I got it right
     

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