New Scene Shop

Shane

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2013
Location
Nashville, tn
We are building a new theatre after 30 years in a Gymnatorium. I will finally have a scene shop and now I am trying to estimate what it should/would cost to outfit said shop for operation on Day One. I have prepared two options, but they are bare bones and I would prefer to know what others have spent before I lock myself in to a zombie shop, as it were.
Has anyone outfitted a shop in recent memory? Any ball park thoughts on turn key cost? Our consultant only says "personal preference," which does not give my administration team much to go on.

What did you spend? What should you have spent?

-Shane
 

Van

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Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
Do some searching here. This is a question that comes up periodically. While you might find some helpful hints what you'll most likely find is guidance. Every shop is going to vary based on the course curricula, allowable work, yearly budget, and skill level of the instructors.
If outfitting the shop is included in the construction budget for the new Theatre then, by all means go for it; reach for the stars and get every last tool you can, if they are only including standing tools then be sure to get a SawStop, and several other 'good' tools like bandsaw, chop saw, radial arm, etc. etc. Also, storage systems should not be overlooked. nothing worse than having all the cool tools and no place to put them.
 

Shane

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2013
Location
Nashville, tn
Do some searching here. This is a question that comes up periodically. While you might find some helpful hints what you'll most likely find is guidance. Every shop is going to vary based on the course curricula, allowable work, yearly budget, and skill level of the instructors.
If outfitting the shop is included in the construction budget for the new Theatre then, by all means go for it; reach for the stars and get every last tool you can, if they are only including standing tools then be sure to get a SawStop, and several other 'good' tools like bandsaw, chop saw, radial arm, etc. etc. Also, storage systems should not be overlooked. nothing worse than having all the cool tools and no place to put them.
Thanks, Van. I appreciate your input. I have been searching the site for a while but I guess I am not looking in the right ways. THis is not included in the construction cost, so I am hoping to find what others spent in total (including equipment, storage, safety, etc.) . My administration would like to see some "comparables." I don't know what I don't know, and it has been 29 years since I worked in a dedicated scene shop.
 

sk8rsdad

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Ottawa
Our shop is always a work in progress so I won't be much help. I guess it would start with knowing how the shop is expected to be used.
  1. woodworking, welding, painting, sculpting, electrical & electronics repair, props crafting, etc.
  2. access considerations - bringing in raw materials, room to assemble, store, and move large pieces to the stage, emergency egress, etc.
  3. storage considerations - industrial shelving, carts, hoists, hazardous and/or flammable materials storage, etc.
  4. tool considerations - workstations, safety considerations, clearances for material handling, dust collectors, fume hoods, etc.
  5. tools - the big stuff that warrants it's own work area, power hand tools, hand tools, esoteric stuff like vacu-forming, 3d printing, etc.
  6. safety stuff like first aid kit, eyewash station, phone.
 

Shane

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2013
Location
Nashville, tn
Our shop is always a work in progress so I won't be much help. I guess it would start with knowing how the shop is expected to be used.
  1. woodworking, welding, painting, sculpting, electrical & electronics repair, props crafting, etc.
  2. access considerations - bringing in raw materials, room to assemble, store, and move large pieces to the stage, emergency egress, etc.
  3. storage considerations - industrial shelving, carts, hoists, hazardous and/or flammable materials storage, etc.
  4. tool considerations - workstations, safety considerations, clearances for material handling, dust collectors, fume hoods, etc.
  5. tools - the big stuff that warrants it's own work area, power hand tools, hand tools, esoteric stuff like vacu-forming, 3d printing, etc.
  6. safety stuff like first aid kit, eyewash station, phone.
Thanks! Good breakdown, here. I have a grip on how it should be used and the categories. My admins want to establish some comparables. Being a nonprofit I have to balance what I need versus the perception of what that should cost.
 

danTt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Location
NY
I think it's fairly impossible for you to obtain comparables without some idea of what you are trying to do. What are you comparing too? Are you working in wood? Metal? Composites? Fabric? Are you also painting in this shop? What scale are you producing on? Is labor or cnc more appropriate? How many people need to be able to work in this space at a time? Are you doing fine finish (props) work or just rough scenic construction?

Without some constraints, there's not really any way to establish a baseline
 
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Shane

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2013
Location
Nashville, tn
I think it's fairly impossible for you to obtain comparables without some idea of what you are trying to do. What are you comparing too? Are you working in wood? Metal? Composites? Fabric? Are you also painting in this shop? What scale are you producing on? Is labor or cnc more appropriate? How many people need to be able to work in this space at a time? Are you doing fine finish (props) work or just rough scenic construction?

Without some constraints, there's not really any way to establish a baseline
Yes. You are correct, of course. We are a high school theatre program that does approximately 14 shows per year. The new shop is 1600sqf. We work primarily in wood and occasionally in Canvas. Yes we have a dedicated paint area. Panel saw, table saw, router station, band saw, radial arm saw, portable air compressors with assorted pneumatics. Storage bins, tool chests, and work benches. We will build work tables and lumber carts. We will probably run a crew of 12-15 volunteers on work days.
I have well used portable equipment that can move in to the space, but if possible I am hoping to start fresh so that we are not running in to budget crunch replacement issues while we are still paying for the facility.

I have priced out what it would take to do a bare bones shop from Day One, but it would be helpful to see what others spent to be functional.
 

Shane

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2013
Location
Nashville, tn
Even if alot of the tools aren't approved, don't overlook the need for ventilation and power. Retractable power and compressed air extensions are always super helpful
yup. Ventilation and power (lots of wall power and retractable) and air, all covered in the building phase. Just trying to get a sense of what others spent on storage, equipment, etc. to get running after construction.
 

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