No-beep solution for 24/7 audio speakers

Hello; I have an artwork to be presented in a long exhibition; we want to put small audio players into concrete; they will be connected by wires and should run 24/7 on loop; bluetooth speakers work fine but we're afraid that the electricity will stop connecting; we don't mind if the speakers stop working then but the issue is that most bluetooth speakers will continue working on battery and then beep annoyingly to indicate low battery. Can someone recommend a no-beep solution?
 

RonHebbard

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Hello; I have an artwork to be presented in a long exhibition; we want to put small audio players into concrete; they will be connected by wires and should run 24/7 on loop; blue tooth speakers work fine but we're afraid that the electricity will stop connecting; we don't mind if the speakers stop working then but the issue is that most blue tooth speakers will continue working on battery and then beep annoyingly to indicate low battery. Can someone recommend a no-beep solution?
Without seeing your speakers, I've two thoughts:
1; Remove or disconnect the batteries.
2; Remove or disconnect the beepers.
I'll crawl back in my cave.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 

FMEng

Well-Known Member
Fight Leukemia
Is there a reason why you can't simply put passive speakers in the concrete and run wires to players elsewhere? Bluetooth has a limited amount of bandwidth, and I suspect too many devices in close proximity either won't work at all, or will sound really bad. The more info you can give us about what you want to achieve, the better our advice will be.
 
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DrewE

Well-Known Member
Either passive speakers, as FMEng suggests, or hardwired active speakers are what you want here. Since you're running wires, there is no need for wireless connectivity; and wires are generally more reliable and more controllable than wireless.

If you have a lot of speakers that are playing the same thing, and especially if you don't need extremely broad or flat frequency response, look into a 70V system. That lets you use a single amplifier for all the speakers and still individually adjust their volumes. While dedicated 70V amplifiers tend to be relatively expensive, particularly in the higher power settings, you can get away with using most any good quality (modern, solid-state) amplifier rated at 600W at 8 ohms to drive a 70V line at up to 600W, and they are readily available. I've used a Crown XLI800 bridged in this capacity without trouble, for example. (A 70V line with an 8 ohm impedance theoretically is running at 612.5 watts.)
 

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