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Odd sort of problem

Discussion in 'Multimedia, Projection, and Show Control' started by blademaster, Nov 17, 2008.

  1. blademaster

    blademaster Active Member

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    I have a problem I think it best fits here...maybe. I need to split coax signal without much degradation loss. I'm thinking of Channel Plus DA-506BID. How good of a brand is this?
     
  2. museav

    museav CBMod CB Mods Departed Member

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    Coax is a type of cable rather than a type of signal. Assuming it is being used for video, which is not necessarily a given, it could still be baseband video, broadband video (RF) or SDI video could run using coax cable. Can you provide more information on the application such as the signal type, source, the destinations, etc.?
     
  3. blademaster

    blademaster Active Member

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    Video and Data. Using it in a household application for TV signal and for broadband internet.
     
  4. museav

    museav CBMod CB Mods Departed Member

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    So I assume you mean a cable feed? That is broadband or RF video. I would tend to just use a passive splitter, there will be some loss but unless your system already has unusually high losses that is typically not a problem. A passive splitter can typically provide high bandwidth in both directions (even the cheap ones have a higher bandwidth than the model noted) as well as being less expensive. You can get a two-way, 2.3GHz splitter for about $6 at Home Depot, $7 for a four-way version.

    I initially installed an RF distribution amp in my home thinking it would help. Although it had an adjustable gain, even at the lowest setting it actually overdrove the runs and I ended up replacing it with a passive splitter. Having worked for a cable company I should have known that they usually plan for a higher level at the home assuming some passive distribution internally.
     
  5. blademaster

    blademaster Active Member

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    Overloaded the runs? Dang, I didn't know that was possible. Well In that case....looks like i'm gonna go with a passive 5 way split. Any idea where i can get one?
     
  6. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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  7. blademaster

    blademaster Active Member

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    Googling is a special skill that is acquired. I am not the best at it. So I thought you guys would be able to help me out :p
     
  8. kwotipka

    kwotipka Active Member

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    Let's not forget that if you are getting your Internet connectivity from a cable modem then it has to go BEFORE an amplifier unless that amp is bi-directional. I would recommend that you hook it up this way:

    Cable comes into house> Low loss passive 1x2 splitter>

    >Cable Modem
    >Additional splitter or Amplifier.

    Yes it is possible to overdrive the receiver in your television/DVR/cable box. They make RF signal strength meters that measure that sort of thing. Get it all set up and if you are having issues, give your CATV provider a call. Be polite and ask if there is a tech in the area to come by and check the levels.

    Your biggest issue is going to be ensuring that the cable modem has enough signal getting into it and that the outbound signal (back to the cable company) is not getting attenuated by the multiple splits downstream of it.

    kw
     
    blademaster and (deleted member) like this.
  9. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    In addition to what [user]kwotipka[/user] said, some new cable boxes require an outbound signal because they also have DOCSIS modems in them for things like on-demand channels. So, if you use features like that you may need to make sure that all your splitters and amplifiers are bi-directional.
     

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