Vintage Lighting Old Followspot Help

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by Thoms, Nov 17, 2016.

  1. EdSavoie

    EdSavoie Well-Known Member

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    By the way, the spot I found with the same socket as yours wasn't actually the Alt Spot, those use some kind of weird screwed in socket I have yet to identify. The now known to be a p40s socket (thanks for that) was in an unused spare, from an ancient "Made in England" Strand Electric followspot I'll get the pattern number off of tomorrow.
     
  2. venuetech

    venuetech Well-Known Member Departed Member

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    I worked with the big A in my youth and i'm still kicking some 40 years later so i would not worry too much about it unless you have been chewing on the wire. but it would be best if you did not handle the stuff without disposable gloves. most of your photos show it to be in good condition (apart from the wire that needs a new crimp)
    the school will be putting together next years budget soon so hopefully they could replace some fixtures then. just be aware that it is a carcinogenic substance and great caution should be taken whenever handling it.
     
  3. microstar

    microstar Well-Known Member

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    This may help.
     

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  4. Craig Hauber

    Craig Hauber Member

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    Don't use vacuum -even with the so-called "hepa" filter -residential grade ones fail too easily and you'll make a worse dust-cloud. -and if not you still have to empty it out eventually!

    If you really must do it yourself, just use a windex bottle full of water and damp everything down good instead.
    However, find a local asbestos abatement specialist and see if they would be willing to donate or provide reduced-rate services (-I've done this for local community theater and just took the fixtures to them -and they got free ad in the program)

    Touching and handling asbestos isn't an issue, it's microscopic fibers of it getting lodged in your lungs -and just like smoking, everybody is different in how they react, some do it all their lives no problems while others can be afflicted with small doses.
    Don't take the risk of any exposure as there is a latent amount of it just floating around in our normal everyday environment so your lungs are dealing with it enough already.
     
  5. venuetech

    venuetech Well-Known Member Departed Member

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    http://www.controlbooth.com/forums/lighting/12931-call-911-not.html
    In my humble opinion we should not be telling a student to work with this hazardous material. Yes it can be done, should a student with no hazardous material training be doing it? No.
    Why get rid of this fixture? for the future student who will come along and want to fix it, but unknowingly expose themselves to a hazardous material.
     
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  6. EdSavoie

    EdSavoie Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, you've got a point.
    Once I started the thought train of cheapass school boards not dealing with this, and the other crap they pull I kinda got a little fired up.

    Attempting to vacuum or remove it without the proper equipment would just make the problem infinitely worse, it was a stupid idea to have thought up and posted.

    Next time the roof springs a leak and they contain a small section of the building (badly mind you) to fix the leak and pull the asbestos, I'll talk with some guys at the board to see if we can pay them a bit more to remove the asbestos from the fixtures.
     
  7. AudJ

    AudJ Well-Known Member

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    In addition, from experience, if you do get it working, the school will probably keep it forever, as opposed asking to replace a fixture with broken lenses and missing parts that contains aesbestos, and getting something new. I bet if administration is posed the question: "Are there funds available to replace this, or should I re-wire the aesbestos myself?" They will quickly come up with $1000, really big plastic bag and a dumpster...
     
  8. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    The problem I see is not the asbestos or getting the fixture working, but, why bother?
    Honestly, I don't know of many spots that use more power to produce less than the 902 Altspot!
    The old 1000Q spots give you 10 times as much light and use less power, and that's with the antique FEL lamp! A 360 watt Comet will give you tons more light and, run cooler as well.
     
  9. EdSavoie

    EdSavoie Well-Known Member

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    Well, in cases other than the OPs spot, there's something to be said for where the unit still works perfectly optically and mechanically. if the focus, shutter and iris still work perfectly and smoothly, it seems wasteful to throw it out.
     
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  10. Les

    Les Well-Known Member

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    I agree with this, and I have rehomed a few fixtures exactly like the ones you are referring to (a pair of vintage 1000Q's with original lamps and gels! I kinda miss those lights). If all else fails, they're certainly good to keep around as spares or additional spot positions.

    However I will also agree that OP's unit has two casters in the grave. Those small parts really add up.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2016
  11. FMEng

    FMEng Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Don't go looking for problems that aren't there. Asbestos insulation in branch circuit wiring, such as in conduits, receptacle and switch boxes, and fuse or breaker panels would be very unusual. More likely, the wire there is insulated with varnished cambric, which is cotton impregnated with an insulating varnish. It isn't a hazardous material. Even if you have some unusual branch circuit wiring with asbestos, it is enclosed and would not pose any hazard unless is it stripped or mechanically abraded in some way. I trust that you and your students leave working on building wiring to a licensed electrician.

    The leads on stage lighting is another matter. Just handling the leads releases fibers into the air, where they can be inhaled. That can be hazardous, and should be dealt with swiftly.
     
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  12. EdSavoie

    EdSavoie Well-Known Member

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    I may be brash at times, but I'm not that stupid. I'm not sticking my fingers anywhere near the 30A 240 wires. Good to know they likely aren't asbestos.

    As for the spot, my concern if it is asbestos is that there is a fan blowing air through the unit when it is on, do you think it would be enough to dislodge particles?
     
  13. FMEng

    FMEng Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    That's a good question. I don't think anyone on this board is qualified to say. An industrial hygenist could test it, but it might be more expensive than the old beast is worth
     
  14. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    interesting discussion. please try to keep "stupid" out of it in due respect.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2016
  15. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    A student is a ward of one’s parents and of the school. Any work done to school gear cannot be done without direct supervision from staff while at school. Sorry.
    Lamp base in photo looks bad but possibly can be resurfaced, looks like the step lens is backward, also in not familiar with the light or clear in photos, is it really that close to the lamp - I would think a gate assembly should be there.
    Asbestos a liability to you, not now but ten years from exposure in showing up. Asbestos, it’s interesting in not being an accumulated exposure, instead is exposure from each breathing of it in. Each time the clock starts again in another chance of cancer later.
    If you want the lights fixed properly and by the rules, either someone on the staff has to supervise and hire or do the asbestos abatement, or as recommended an authorized Altman service center should be sought out for the spot and for the other lights in question. Sorry and this would in cost about add up to a new spotlight for restoring it.
    And also while mentioning this to the school/theater management, I don’t think you can just put the spotlight in the dumpster... by asbestos removal rules at least, it shouldn’t be put in the dumpster.
    Awkward position the school is in for the spot and other lights to say the least, but one the admin has to find a solution to.

     
  16. Les

    Les Well-Known Member

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    Not to worry, @ship . @EdSavoie was berating himself for advising the use of a vacuum w/HEPA filter in an earlier post. You're not stupid, Ed. :)
     
  17. jonliles

    jonliles Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I thought one of the lenses was broken and missing a large chunk from the middle. Can you even find replacement (not the step) lenses for it? It's probably not asbestos, but why take the risk? Personally, I would I would let this one be retired.

    Maybe the PTA or Booster Club can help raise funds for a newer / slightly use follow spot.
     
  18. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Oh, that's Asbestos with a capital A.
    Spent too many years around that stuff when it was everywhere. Had rolls of it. Two layers thick, inner asbestos core, then braided asbestos around it. No one can tell me how much exposure is too much, and hard to say if an occasional brush with it is all it takes. If it only takes a little, then I am screwed as back in the 60's, 70's and early 80's it was all over the place. Probably more like smoking, some smoke all their lives and don't get lung cancer. Other's get it after just a few cigarettes. Bottom line, people die more often if they have had it in their lives.
     
  19. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    And none of us are immune in each time putting the nail on the coffin or exposure in the clock restarting. I'm a collector of lighting and worker with it for necessary for shows in upgrading it in frequently dealing with asbestos. I have been a professional in the industry for a really long time now. Been lucky for years now but not safe.

    My say if of worth, a student should not be exposed to it. Not have any part in the re-wiing of it if saved as per obsolete gear. A student like I might even if choosing the proper wiring when advised, and given the proper terminals to crimp in replacement, might not note things, in some ways not replace what's needed or not properly terminate or have sufficient pressure on termnals. In the best of conditions, one can be trained by a teacher like I was with say Union stage pin plugs - than later I learned better, but who is checking a student's tension even on a terminal? What tool used to crimp it? There is a lot to look at in an old spotlight, only a factory authorized or very experienced tech person has that ability. Years of training to make a light safe in noticing all the details ofpotential problems. Liability also.

    I don't even want this spot in my collection. These spotlights need to have a trash bag put over them and wheeled to the maintience part of the building to deal with. Sorry, no more spots until the theater department figures out what to do next in buying new. Done, simple.... sorry. And I am sorry to post this but it is necessary given the details presented. I and others could save the spotlight but it is also inefficient and obsolete. Look towards what spotlight to replace it with in a much better happy thing to look towards. Budget verses features. A new better thing to look to in helping advise the school staff on what to buy. Lots of research in what brand and type of followspot to buy especially given some really crappy websites.

    Remember also that as a student, sorry, but you should not be contacting vendors directly.
     
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