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old non-nema 'pin-out' style twistlocks

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by mrb, May 31, 2009.

  1. mrb

    mrb Active Member

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    Do many schools / theaters still have the old non nema 'pin-out' style twistlocks? Dont know what made me think of it. My HS had them (mid 90s) and it was a nightmare to get ahold of them, and most of our cable inventory had the bakelite females that would shatter when dropped on the ground.
     
  2. baisdend

    baisdend Member

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    We have these and we are trying to phase them out when we transistion to a renovated space within the next two years. My source who was able to find these for me the last time I needed replacements said that I may have bought all that was left of this kind in the market. What a pain.....
     
  3. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Some things just refuse to die. We were trying to phase these out when I worked in a lighting shop in the mid-80s. See TLGO.
     
  4. mrb

    mrb Active Member

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    neat. I caused a glossary entry :D
     
  5. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    The Bakelite ones were the worst. We had those in my high school. They probably still have them - I havent been back in two years, but not much happens around there in terms of tech improvements. You'd just let the connector hit the floor and it would explode all over the place.
     
  6. FatherMurphy

    FatherMurphy Active Member

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    Actually, NEMA does still list some dog-out twistlock styles, although most of those are in the 277/480 voltage ranges. Just because it's dog-out, doesn't mean it's non-NEMA (although it's probably not the 'correct' one for your use).

    Kind of like the XLR cable/mic cable discussion....
     
  7. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Many "Non-Nema" plugs are still on the market in being made. So what was that... hot towards hook or other concept in wiring them right or wrong? Perhaps one at a time get them swapped out our at least for a standard do a paint marker standard in wiring them both hot terminals for you in how it's wired. Someone wiring up such a thing in seeing a white verses black marked terminal would get the idea. Switch over with time or with a few hundred in cash or parts.
     
  8. mrb

    mrb Active Member

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    I agree they should get swapped out as budget permits. They could be changed in groups with adaptors made out of the plugs removed. Its not that bad...

    Ship, you and I both know what twistlocks and stagepin can be purchased for........
     
  9. Thefoxygranpa

    Thefoxygranpa Active Member

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    Strange, these connectors were installed in a new high school I have mentioned in previous posts! Its brand new and was just built last year...
     
  10. mrb

    mrb Active Member

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    wow. i wonder why?
     
  11. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

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    Are you sure it was the outdated non-NEMA connectors in question, or are they some kind of NEMA connector (most likely a variety of NEMA L5-15 or L5-20 given that you're in the US)? I would think connectors that have the tendency to break like that explained earlier would be hard to get past code, but I can think of a few good reasons to have all twist locking power cables. Not the least of which is that being the recommended standard for certain cables if you utilize ETC's dimmer doubling, as well as there handy locking characteristic to make troubleshooting easier, and finally to ensure constant connection if you are going to have a lot of vertical cable runs where the connectors might be on the vertical run and therefore under constant stress because of the weight of the cable.
     
  12. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Only the older TLGO connectors were made from Bakelite. Newer ones are plastic and Nylon, just like the L5-20.

    Most of us can think of many more reasons NOT to use a TwistLock connector, there Pork: http://www.controlbooth.com/forums/lighting/11759-2p-g-stage-pin-vs-edison-vs-twist-lock.html.
     
  13. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

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  14. llecount

    llecount Member

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    Our theatre dept on campus has these plugs all throughout their theatre (built in the 60's)
    However, there's some older plugs in the floor pockets that have spring loaded centers with 3 pins similar to a twistlock plug. Never seen these in my life, and we've got 2 or 3 boxes full of these in storage. Something tells me they were removed at sometime and upgraded to the current twistlock that we have now.
    I'm just fortunate that my theatre has all stage pin, I hate dealing with adapters just to make everything work.
     
  15. mrb

    mrb Active Member

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    on those old ones, is the center of the female a plastic plate that pushes in, and the male has a solid plastic post sticking out of it with contacts on the sides of it? Those are cool as they are listed for disconnecting under load. They are still used in industry and hospitals use them for X ray machines and stuff. I forget the name of them, but hubbell calls them hubbellock
     
  16. llecount

    llecount Member

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    That would be them. Had no idea they were still used, always thought they were obsolete. I haven't found any of the male plugs around there yet, guessing most of them are long gone.
     
  17. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    Never hearing of such an animal, I had to Google till I found a picture.
    [​IMG]





    Cleaning up here at school I found a box of two-prong twist lock. Kept a few for my own collection but tossed the rest. (Sorry)
     
  18. llecount

    llecount Member

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    Interesting looking plug. I'll be over in the other theatre today. I'll snag one of those old female plugs and post a picture.. that is if anyone is curious about what they look like. (don't want to drag this off topic)
     
  19. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    I think we are ok if we keep talking about obsolete connectors.
     
  20. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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