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Old Strand Lights - UK, NZ, SA, Oz, Europe

Discussion in 'New Member Board' started by Limeburner, Aug 3, 2008.

  1. Limeburner

    Limeburner Member

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    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    I recently stumbled upon this site and am very pleased I did! What a great resource you we have here.

    Although I am not is the habit of pushing sales items I thought you may be interested is a wee product for converting your old Strand 23s and 123s to take newer and cheaper T/26, 650w lamps. It's called the C-Block and you can check it out and me on the Company website Enter

    My interests include collecting and restoring older Strand stage lights and putting them back out there in the theatres. I feel that there are some wonderful beam qualities that are particular to some of the older lamps that are harder to find today in a ‘maximum light output’ driven design. How many remember the fantastic beam angle and smoothness of the 223 Fresnels. Still a great lantern...

    Anyway enough of the reminiscing. Today's lanterns are pretty amazing too. Try the Selecon Pacific cool light. Great light control and optics but keep a piece of soft Hamburg frost and a top hat for a nice blending beam.

    Cheers

    Phill Dexter:cool:
     
  2. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Welcome, Phill. Upon reading your profile, I'm only slightly disappointed that you're not David Hersey.:)

    I bet you could add some insight to this thread.

    General consensus seems to be the only future for fixtures such as the Altman 360 Profile is immediate replacement with a SourceFour. Which would you rather use, a Pat23 or a Selecon Pacific Zoomspot?
     
  3. Hughesie

    Hughesie Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Freelance Lighting Programmer/grandMA Trainer
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    The venue i volunteer at still uses the good ol pattern 23 and the pacfic zoom spot. Personally i really can't go past the quality that is the patt 23, a light designed for function not for some art studio

    Pure Beauty
    [​IMG]
    Just Another Horseshoe light:twisted:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2008
  4. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I'm sorry, but MOST, if not all, Theatrical Lighting Designers choose a fixture based on its photometrics, NOT its visual appeal or craftsmanship/manufacturing tolerances.
     
  5. Hughesie

    Hughesie Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    Reliability must come into it at some point, you want a reliable light that you know will work every time. How it looks is just a secondary issue but i personally think it plays a part, and i am aware of your dislike of some strand products derek:mrgreen:.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Limeburner

    Limeburner Member

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    Location:
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    Hi Derek, I had the opportunity to production LX for Hersey twice in the last 15 years and a very insightful experience it was.

    With regards to which luminaire I would prefer when given the choice of a Pacific and a P23 it would depend on the situation. If it were a small low grid/roofed little theatre with little hanging space then it would be the 23. More height probably the Pacific. It's all about choosing the right instrument for the job.

    Also note that designers usually choose their lanterns from the house stock that is normally purchased over time by technical managers. They will quite often make their choice based on price, construction quality, cost of lamp, appearance and ease of access to parts. The photometrics can be a little further down the list in my experience.

    Also photometrics only provide optimum light output. They don't give any indication to beam quality.
     

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