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Origin of the Word Camlock

Discussion in 'Question of the Day' started by Grog12, Jun 19, 2008.

  1. Grog12

    Grog12 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    As in what is the origin of the word camlock?
     
  2. Les

    Les Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    A cam is a projecting part of a rotating wheel or shaft that strikes a lever at one or more points on its circular path. The cam can be a simple tooth, as is used to deliver pulses of power to a steam hammer, for example, or an eccentric disc or other shape that produces a smooth reciprocating (back and forth) motion in the follower which is a lever making contact with the cam.

    Cam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    This definition plus the fact that it uses the cam action to engage a locking device are the reason it's called a "camlock".
     
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  3. Grog12

    Grog12 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    The lock part is the easy part ;) Granted half of my students and other co-workers have yet to figure out what makes a twist lock a twist lock.
     
  4. sound_nerd

    sound_nerd Active Member

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    Well, you could blame the "Cam-Lok" branded connectors.
     
  5. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Can someone describe the locking mechanism of a Camlock?
     
  6. avare

    avare Active Member

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    I am almost certain this is not what you are looking for but it is accurate. The origin is the marketing department of KDI SEALTRON which filed for trademark registration in 1968 for the word. The trademark is still live (Trademark Office speak for in force) and currently owned by Cooper Industries, whose subsidiary Crouse-Hinds uses it.

    Do you want a Kleenex or some Coke to refresh you? If it isn't clear, maybe a Leko will help lighten it? I won't offer a Big Mac or Whopper to sooth your stomach. If you were in Canada I could offer you an Aspirin. In the USA aspirin has a become a generic word but is still a trademark in Canada.

    Andre
     
  7. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    You mean these?
     
  8. Grog12

    Grog12 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Nope derek, these.
     
  9. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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  10. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    First time I've ever heard "He-He"s and "She-She"s called "suicide connectors". Those wacky film gaffers!;) Now that I recall, I think I've heard Mole-Pins called suicide pins. In the olden days, I used Tweco welding connectors for feeder many times.

    [user]avare[/user] is correct. The Crouse-Hinds (now Cooper) trademarked Cam-Lok E1016 series connectors are the industry standard. These. I like these "E1016-compatible" connectors better. The two-piece hard-shell attaches with four Phillips head screws, making covering oneself in EZ-Pull unnecessary, which I find best for after-work activities.
     
  11. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    What's up Grog? First you electrocute yourself on an powered Male Stage Pin now you are looking for connectors that come with a warning that they may kill you. Looking to write a new chapter in Dr. Doom's book on creative electrocution?
     

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