oscilloscope

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by Krawford, Jul 10, 2019.

  1. Krawford

    Krawford Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Canada
    Looking to get an oscilloscope for my shop, we have been making some fun little Arduino/DMX actuators over the past year and having a scope should make life a little easier when troubleshooting prototypes. anyone have a favorite brand/model?
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  2. FMEng

    FMEng Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    2,051
    Likes Received:
    1,012
    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    I doubt you could go wrong with Tektronix.
     
    Van and RonHebbard like this.
  3. Chris Pflieger

    Chris Pflieger Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    154
    Location:
    Indiana
    RonHebbard likes this.
  4. eadler

    eadler Active Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    68
    Occupation:
    Director of Engineering (Broadcast)
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Unless you need to look at high speed data lines or transients you should be able to get by with almost any old tektronix scope - check eBay or craigslist. The 465 is great, you should be able to find one for less than $200 without much trouble, cheaper if you hunt around.

    If you want to be able to share and teach with it, you may want a newer "DPO" or "DSO" style scope that supports saving waveforms and perhaps a video output and some more advanced features.

    I have a nice 4 channel Tek TDS3034B at work rated for 300 MHz that has modules that cost a few thousand dollars each in it. I have a nice 4 channel Siglent (SDS1104X-E) scope at home rated for 50 MHz that works at 100 MHz (and can be made to work at 200MHz) that has a lot more features (including i2c and other serial protocol decoding) and cost less than a $700 total (including probes and terminators and such). The Tek is calibrated and I trust it explicitly, I treat the Siglent as an indicator and it works great for 95% of what I do both at home and at work.
     
    Van and RonHebbard like this.
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,265
    Likes Received:
    1,774
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    RonHebbard likes this.
  6. TimMc

    TimMc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    1,162
    RonHebbard likes this.
  7. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,265
    Likes Received:
    1,774
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    TimMc and RonHebbard like this.
  8. STEVETERRY

    STEVETERRY Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,422
    Likes Received:
    901
    Location:
    New York
    RonHebbard likes this.
  9. Chris Pflieger

    Chris Pflieger Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    154
    Location:
    Indiana
  10. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,196
    Likes Received:
    1,552
    Location:
    North Wales PA
    RonHebbard likes this.
  11. STEVETERRY

    STEVETERRY Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,422
    Likes Received:
    901
    Location:
    New York
    Les, RonHebbard and Van like this.
  12. Chris Pflieger

    Chris Pflieger Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    154
    Location:
    Indiana
    Les and RonHebbard like this.
  13. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,196
    Likes Received:
    1,552
    Location:
    North Wales PA
    100Mhz used to be near the limit as analog scopes had to deal with CRT tube deflection issues. Technically, digital scopes are limited only by what is practical to bring to market. The display is totally separate from the sampling electronics and is pretty much just displaying a picture. The sampling circuits can be in the Ghz range. That info is then processed by the microprocessor software and a representative graphic is generated and displayed.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  14. TimMc

    TimMc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    1,162
  15. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member Departed Member

    Messages:
    4,154
    Likes Received:
    443
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    RonHebbard likes this.
  16. DrewE

    DrewE Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    157
    Location:
    Vermont
    Agilent (itself spun off of HP) has in turn spun or sold off their electronic test equipment; the oscilloscopes are now made and sold by Keysight.

    One of the neatest and handiest scopes I've had the opportunity to use was an HP mixed signal oscilloscope, with a couple (or was it four? it was some time ago) "normal" DSO channels--with decently deep memory depth--and sixteen digital channels that formed a sort of mini logic analyzer. I seem to recall they informally referred to it as the "scopealyzer." It looks like Keysight still sells some descendants of that line, if you care to buy a brand new oscilloscope rather than a brand new car.

    For analog circuits or repeating waveforms, a plain analog scope is very often sufficient and used ones are not expensive. For digital signaling, particularly serial communications and the like, a digital storage scope is very much handier as the things one wishes to look at are often not nicely periodic.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  17. Chris Pflieger

    Chris Pflieger Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    154
    Location:
    Indiana
  18. DavidCNelson

    DavidCNelson Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    I picked up a Rigol DS1054Z on Amazon for $350. There are large number of places on-line that tell you how to unlock all the features. But now its ships with everything already unlocked, so no hack is necessary. Being able to record signals over time and then decode the serial byte values is great. I've got a couple old analog scopes, but this does everything I need and takes up a lot less space. It comes with 4 probes, so you don't have to buy them separately.
     
    eadler likes this.
  19. theatrewireless

    theatrewireless Jim @RC4Wireless #RC4DoesThat

    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    115
    Occupation:
    Wireless DMX and dimming product design
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    eadler and RonHebbard like this.
  20. eadler

    eadler Active Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    68
    Occupation:
    Director of Engineering (Broadcast)
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    I see 465s and 475s all over all the time but not on craigslist... almost all of them with the IBM silkscreen -- but that's because Endicott is right here. I also see a lot of other manufacturers scopes around and a lot of tek scopes on craigslist in adjacent areas.

    Well, I wasn't born yet...

    Again, depends on needs. I wouldn't buy a non-functional one these days since there are so many readily available and I wouldn't buy an instrument of that age for calibrated use (unless very specific feature sets were needed). It's interesting to note that the calibration procedure for the 465 requires a functioning oscilloscope (among other things). The calibration procedure for the 422 suggests a voltmeter and ohmmeter I believe (I don't think both were actually required, I may be mistaken though). I might have a 422 that I acquired (gratis) some years ago and reconditioned and recalibrated so that I could use it to recalibrate a 465...
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice