The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

Phantom of the Opera

Discussion in 'Special Effects' started by squigish, Mar 24, 2005.

  1. squigish

    squigish Member

    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0
    Anybody know how they do the chandelier effect in the phantom of the opera?
     
  2. DJErik07

    DJErik07 Active Member

    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    MA/ NC
    Ya if you have lots of $$$ and plenty of time.
     
  3. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    5,948
    Likes Received:
    225
    Occupation:
    Stagehand/ Production Company Owner
    Location:
    Howell, NJ
  4. LDSFX

    LDSFX Member

    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Fullerton, CA
    Well in laymen's terms: It invloves two main parts. The "track" cable (on which the chandelier slides) and the "traveler" cable (which actually raises and lowers the chandelier up and down the track cable. Theres also a power cable that travles with it to power the lights. Thats about it.
     
  5. squigish

    squigish Member

    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0
    And the traveler cable is just connected to the normal fly system?
     
  6. LDSFX

    LDSFX Member

    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Fullerton, CA
    No, if you think about it, the chandelier moves on a completely different axis than a traditional fly system. It is most likely powered by a computerized winch system from Stage Command (the main theatrical mechanical effects engineering corporation.)
     
  7. Peter

    Peter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,189
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    MA, USA
    Completly random comment here, but I just thought I'd share what was probably my first tech crew experience.

    In third or fourth grade me and a friend managed to convince the teacher to let us out of class for a while and go down to the gym. We threw two long lengths of fishingline over the rafters and back down the ground. Our class had made a large colored cutout of santa's sleigh and raindeer out of cardboard. me and my friend went and did some serious tapeing and taped straws to the back of all the cardboard and attached all the cardboard with fishing line. We ran one line of the fishing line throgh the sraws and tied that line off on the opposet side of the gym. We attached the other line to the first piece of cardboard allowing us to pull the whole "train" right up to the rafters across the gym. (it was supposto be pulled by a motor, but that didnt pull it fast enough, so we just did it by hand) During lunch, at some prearranged time we few it up to corrispond with something the teachers were doing. (notice how much i remember about the device and how little i remember about the activity! lol) anyway, i had GREAT fun doing this and i guess it was a kinda distant precursor to all my tech crew work!

    anyway, I think that is a smilair (although lowtech) version of what would be required to "fly" in a chandelier in a manner simliar to what is being talked about here

    (sorry if that was completly random!)
     
  8. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

    Messages:
    1,079
    Likes Received:
    474
    Occupation:
    Polishing the brass on the Titanic.
    Location:
    Not at home, that's for sure.
    Well, if you're doing the chandelier in Vegas, you have a FTSI automation system to control each piece with a minimum 4 axes of motion.

    And money to BURN!
     
  9. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

    Messages:
    1,079
    Likes Received:
    474
    Occupation:
    Polishing the brass on the Titanic.
    Location:
    Not at home, that's for sure.
    Phantom

    Somewhere in some other thread, the comment was relayed that the Wicked crew said something about Phantom staying the same since day one.

    Maybe not anymore. At least not the star of the show anyway.
    YouTube - Phantom Opera Las Vegas Chandelier Animation

    Since when does scenery require collision avoidance software? (no, I'm not kidding)
     
  10. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    12,467
    Likes Received:
    2,456
    Occupation:
    Theater Manager & T.D.
    Location:
    Seattle, Washington
    Re: Phantom

    Here's the best bootleg I've found of the real thing.

    Check this out. We have to get this guy to join CB. He would definitely fit right in around here.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2008
  11. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

    Messages:
    1,079
    Likes Received:
    474
    Occupation:
    Polishing the brass on the Titanic.
    Location:
    Not at home, that's for sure.
    Re: Phantom

    The guy that did that 2nd video probably has mad skillz with Lego's too.:grin:
     
  12. shakenblaken

    shakenblaken Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Texas
    Phantom Chandalier

    I have always wondered how to make the Chandalier crash in the show, does anyone have any designs or drawings on how they do it?
     
  13. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    3,006
    Likes Received:
    952
    Occupation:
    Consultant
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    They call professional flying effects companies. Be it Hall Associates, ZFX Flying Systems, D2, or Flying by Foy.

    They each have packages for Phantom to "crash" the chandelier safely.

    Attempts for anyone to try to do it on their own without extensive flying effects and rigging experience could result in actually crashing the chandelier and/or getting someone killed.

    I doubt you'll find any designs or drawings for this effect. Nobody wants their design of an effect like that public for someone else to try replicating and possibly get somebody hurt. Also, any professional designing an effect like that would consider their design proprietary as they probably were paid a substantial amount for their engineering of it.
     
  14. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

    Messages:
    4,378
    Likes Received:
    2,755
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV, USA
    What [USER]MNicolai[/USER] said.

    To learn more about one chandelier (as mentioned above), see Phantom at The Venetian - from FTSI .

    Official press reports state that since the venue is being given over to the Tim McGraw/Faith Hill Soul2Soul production beginning in December, "the chandelier will remain fixed in its high position." Which I think odd because one would assume it belongs to the production and would load-out with all of the other Phantom scenery when the production closes on Sept. 2.
     
  15. chausman

    chausman Chase Premium Member Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    2,994
    Likes Received:
    239
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    I know it requires a lot of support structure and has a very large steel cable (like 8" hole in the walls) and very large winch off stage. And requires a lot of work to keep its lines out of site when onstage for the beginning.
     
  16. Grog12

    Grog12 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    2,615
    Likes Received:
    172
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Given that particular chandelier was designed specifically for that space as they built it, and is a much grander effect than any other Phantom chandelier, yeah its not really that surprising.
     
  17. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    12,467
    Likes Received:
    2,456
    Occupation:
    Theater Manager & T.D.
    Location:
    Seattle, Washington
    I believe part of Derek's point is that this is Vegas. A multi-million dollar show opens and closes there all the time. They don't leave relics of old shows hanging about, just in case. They gut the theater and start over with a new look specifically designed for the new act.
     
  18. tdrga

    tdrga Active Member

    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    42
    Location:
    Central TX
    Having some familiarity with the last national tour- the description above is correct except that there was no power cable- all chandelier lighting was wireless and battery powered.

    The brake on the lifting cable motor was a train wheel air brake- so that gives you an idea of some of the forces involved.

    -Todd
     
  19. AndrewDavid

    AndrewDavid Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Upstate Central NY
    I wondered that myself and found out that there are two major sets of lines. One, in the theatre ceiling that actually lifts the chandelier, and two, held in the flys above the stage. To raise it, the second set of lines lift the chandelier of the ground then give slack as the first set pull it out over the audience and up to the ceiling. The falling is just the reverse of that, the first set of lines lower the chandelier to a point where the second set is taught and pulls the chandelier from hitting the audience onto the stage, it then quickly, but carefully, lowers the chandelier to the stage floor.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice