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Plugs around the world

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by derekleffew, Mar 25, 2018.

  1. macsound

    macsound Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I rewired my house with stage pin. And put a mini-disc deck in my car. THE FUTURE!!
    Seriously though, what scares me is a friend who has a chevy volt and the crazy transformer they ship to convert 110v to whatever charges the car.
    The cable is too short to reach the ground, so they place it on the car seat through the window. Got so hot, it melted the pleather.
     
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  2. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @macsound When you rewired your abode with "stage pin", did you leap directly to three contact 2P&G's or merely 2P's?
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard
     
    macsound likes this.
  3. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    When you look at what 5-15P costs (inline), 2P&G starts looking like a viable alternative!
     
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  4. JonCarter

    JonCarter Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    Ron, I saw your post and couldn't stop laughing. I've been amazed by the "tape measure race" for years. Every one of these people whose "SuperTape" I've seen in detail has a very worn first 4'-6' followed by 46'-44' of virgin tape measure. Meanwhile I have a 50-year-old Craftsman 1/2" 10' tape (fits in my pocket) that does 99.5% of the measuring that I need.
     
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  5. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @JonCarter Understood and appreciated. I began my apprenticeship with a 3/4" x 12' and completed my five years with a 3/4" x 16'. In my primary tool box I carried a 3/4" x 25 and a number of years later a 3/4" x 33'. In my secondary tool box I eventually owned a 1/2" x 100' white-faced Craftsman with a crank on the side and a nickle-plated 3/8" x 50' with a crank inherited from my grandfather on my father's side who'd been a cabinet maker in England in his younger years prior to emigrating to Canada. Decades later, I added a Hilti point and shoot laser measurer and a Hilti self-leveling three axis level to my collection and never regretted purchasing the pair of Hilti's.
    EDIT: Added further comments and mentioned Hilti laser tools.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  6. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Location:
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    Oh dear.
    That's probably also got 240V running through a cable designed for 120, given it's an Australian outlet...
    I do hope the RCD has been tested lately
     
  7. JonCarter

    JonCarter Well-Known Member

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    SJ cords and variants (SJO, SJT, etc.) are rated at 300V; S and variants (SO, ST, etc.) are rated at 600V.
     
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  8. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Yep, but isn't the voltage rating a peak one?
    240V RMS is about 340V peak, so we're now outside the 300V rating...
    Australian cable is all a minimum of 600V rated, and required to be double insulated...
     
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  9. Jay Ashworth

    Jay Ashworth Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Concerning ground up/dn on 5-15R's, there is a practical driver, as Bill alludes:

    If the ground pin is on top, and a plug not completely seated, any falling metal item that might get between the plug and the plate has a good chance of hitting the ground pin, and either stopping or bouncing.

    If the ground pin is on the bottom, such a metal item will land across the hot and neutral, possibly tripping a breaker or, if you're *really* lucky, starting a fire.

    I've tested this; it *is* possible for a plug to get a sufficient distance from the plate to enable this without coming unplugged.
     
  10. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @Jay Ashworth If I was feeling bold and honest, I could attest to badly burning a 3/4" x 16' measuring tape during my Installation and Maintenance provincially licensed IBEW apprenticeship with Canada's Comstock Electrical division in the final weeks of finishing a hospital expansion and renovation project. Every time you were transferred to a different job site, if it was close to finishing, you were informed if they wanted the receptacle grounds left, right, up or down. Down was often specified and one day I was measuring horizontally approximately 12' across the wall of a fully finished room to cut in an added single-gang box and blew the snot out of my 16' tape when it slipped down and arced across a plug EXACTLY as you described.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard
     
    Jay Ashworth likes this.

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