Portable doors

hollallen

Member
I am in a sticky situation and wondering if anyone has any ideas here. I am assigned to design a small portable set that can be used in assemblies and assembled by a few people, portable to fit into a van or truck. However, the set calls for entrance through a door. Now how the heck does one make a portable door that is funtional...any ideas anyone?
 

Amiers

Renting to Corporate One Fixture at a Time.
How big of a truck or van. you can weld up a steel frame with 12" base on either side of the frame and put it on casters. Then just attach door at load in. You could build the frame in pieces and drop bolts in it but then I would suggest building a box frame for it.
 

hollallen

Member
How long does this thing need to last?
Thanks for your responses. I am not sure what it will be transported in but I am assuming nothing no larger than a van with maybe 6'-8' of length to work with. Welding is not my specialty. So based on the previous message I am assuming we are talking building a door jamb of separate pieces? My challenge is figuring how to secure ito to the floor since more than likely some venues would not allow screws to be used in the floors like school assemblies and such. The shutter would be a faux front like a grandfather clock that would open to expose something behind it.
 

Evans Poulos

Active Member
Preung Hollow core door from box store is not heavy. Put a square of half inch ply down, screw the jamb into it with a triangular brace on the upstage side and paint the brace black and the ply to match the deck.
 

lwinters630

Well-Known Member
I am in a sticky situation and wondering if anyone has any ideas here. I am assigned to design a small portable set that can be used in assemblies and assembled by a few people, portable to fit into a van or truck. However, the set calls for entrance through a door. Now how the heck does one make a portable door that is funtional...any ideas anyone?
As Evans suggested but to clarify a trianular brace is called a stage jack. Here is a new design I like posted by Van.
Improved stage jack.jpg
 

venuetech

Well-Known Member
Departed Member
I take a pre hung door, install a beveled 1x6 on the bottom. the top corners get a Simpson strongtie L-strap that has inside nail holes counter sunk for screws. door frame is squared then L-straps installed on face of door with long screws into pilot holes. 1x4 trim is then added to hide the straps. best to have the door swing away from the face. Short 2x4 corner blocks (60*x30*) are fitted to the bottom plate/door frame. the jack is built to the size of the door, it only has to be as high as the top hinge. It installs with hinges on the hinged side of the door. I like to back the hinge side of the frame with 1/4 ply glued on. the jack usualy is at a 45* angle so it supports the door when opened and when closed. If they really crash and bang the door you may want a second jack.
 

Mike R

Active Member
I take a pre-framed door and essentially put triangles on either side. They provide a lot of strength and stability to the door. In addition, I put a couple wheels and a handle on one side, so that I can tip the door onto it's side and roll it. Really helps if you are moving them on your own or over distances.
Screen Shot 2016-03-15 at 9.31.49 AM.png
 

JLNorthGA

Active Member
Director of a children's program at our theater would like a free standing door for her kids to use in a production.

The door (door unit) has to be able to be easily struck offstage. Therefore I can't secure it to the stage.
I can go ahead and add a threshold across the door - that's okay by her.

Need some ideas on how to do this. One thought I had is to make a rolling platform on which I would set the door unit. That way I wouldn't need the threshold. I would just build a small platform with wheels and leave the side away from the audience open so the crew could lock the wheels. One step (7 1/2"). I could easily secure the door to the platform and keep it upright.

Other thoughts?
 

BillConnerFASTC

Well-Known Member
Try to keep riser a 7" max, 6" better. Also beware that single risers are missed a lot resulting in falls and injuries. The building code requires a handrail, even for single steps, here and almost every where with a few exceptions.
 

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