Resume and Cover Letter Advice?

I have reviewed several of the advice threads, and edited mine via advice already given. But was hoping to get some final advice real quick.

Also specific advice on how to write a cover letter. I've only written one, and that was for the intern position at my college, and I was the only one applying...and I'm pretty sure it wasn't quite right.

Circumstances concerning personal life have led me to take time off from seeking my degree, but I would still like to pursue experience. After looking on Artsearch and Backstage.com there are a few jobs in the Stl, MO area I plan on sending it into.

Resume has had Phone Number, Address, and Reference Info removed.
The references I do have on my actual one, are aware that I am using them and have OK'd it.
Attachment is a PDF file.
*UPDATED*
View attachment Justin_Crouch_Resume_ControlBooth.pdf

Thanks for any feedback,
Justin
 
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LXPlot

Active Member
You shouldn't add slang to a resume.
-Eliminate TBD and replace with To be determined, N/A, or simply leave as (on hiatus)
-Eliminate the phrase LX and replace with lighting.
Knowledgeable of saws, not knowledgeable in them.
Not Suessical, Seussical.
Computer and lighting applications and hardware can have the first and replaced with a comma.
You shouldn't add dashes in words like Props Crew or Props master. I believe propsmaster is one word, the other shouldn't have dashes.
If you've done stage manager and propsmaster than assistant stage manager and props crew are redundant
Conversely, you might want to add programmer.
Your very last paragraph (about your different professors) needs a lot of cleaning up. I'm not sure if this the actual resume or just filler to keep those people's names secret, if it's actual it needs some editing in fluidity, details, etc.
Professor has 2 of the letter S and only one F

Hope I helped.
 

derekleffew

Resident Curmudgeon
Senior Team
Premium Member
...Also specific advice on how to write a cover letter. I've only written one, and that was for the intern position at my college, and I was the only one applying...and I'm pretty sure it wasn't quite right. ...
If you got the position applied-for, the cover letter served its intended purpose.:)

Resume advice:
"To obtain a job and gain more experience in the theatre-arts" No hyphen and capitalize Theatre Arts.
"as well as guiding the stagecraft class in their learning." Awkward, rephrase. "Class" is singular; "their" is plural.
Don't use "Lx" as an abbrev. for Lighting.
Capitalize job titles: Master Elec., Stage Manager, etc. Never abbrev.
Titles of shows are ALWAYS italicized.
Strike the word "techie" from your vocabulary, especially onerous on a resume.
"• Anticipated Graduation: TBD(On hiatus).
• Was pursuing a BA in theatre with a focus on technical theatre."
Taking time off from Truman is fine, but you call undue attention to it. Rephrase. Anyone who reads this is going to want to know why.
"Actor & Run crew for 2 musicals (Les Miserables and Suessical) and 1
play." What was the ONE play? Why list the musicals' titles and not the play's?
"I have 3 professors, one is the TD and tech proffesor," Spellcheck!

Cover letter advice:
"Dear Sir/Madam,
Please consider my application for the advertised position of ____ with NoPay/LoPay Theatre Company. As the enclosed resume shows, I have experience in ____, and would welcome the opportunity to discuss with you how I can be an asset to NoPay/LoPay Theatre Company.

I can be contacted at any time via ..."

In my opinion, the cover letter serves to
1. Identity what it is you're applying for
2. Pique the interest of the reader sufficient so they will go on to glance at your resume.
3. Provide contact details.

Much of the resume information can be/is duplicated in the cover letter, but in a less formal and more conversational manner.

Hope this helps.:)

Some valuable, some not so valuable, points in this CNN article: http://money.cnn.com/2011/02/25/pf/saving/resume_blunders.moneymag/index.htm .
 
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Hm, I've always spelled Dr. Seuss wrong then...But will fix, and try to remember.
The last paragraph is not part of real resume, it is there to explain my choice of references. There was a fairly lengthy tip on regards of who to choose.

But thanks.
 
Changes have been applied (will update attachment soon).
Question though on what you mean by programmer. I PRESUME you are talking about light board programming?

I have programmed cues in, with timing and intensity and such, but isn't there more to it than that? I wasn't sure if I had as much experience doing any more than that, so I left it off.

Also, I do have COMPUTER programming experience, is that worth putting on a theatre resume? Is knowing Basic, Java, HTML, Python, or Ada computing languages helpful?
 

Footer

Senior Team
Senior Team
Premium Member
1 PAGE. 1 PAGE. 1 PAGE.

First, I'm not going to hire you because you use the word techie in your resume' and in your email address. Most professionals (including me) have a severe aversion to the word. So much so I would not even bother printing your resume'. Get that off your resume' and get a new email address.

2nd.
Take a look through those threads again. You formatted your resume' like a business resume', not a theatre resume'. Give us a show by show breakdown as well as the skills you used for those shows. You don't need to list every show, but at least list what you were involved in at that institution.

Read some more of those resume' threads and take their advice.
 
...Ya, I was just reading the lasted additions to the Technician/Techie debate. Readily noted and will do.

As far as one page...Should references ALSO fit on the SAME page? Or are those a page to themselves? That's how I have it here. Is 1 page to the resume, 1 to the references.

And I used to have one formated the way you describe, I will create one from this right now.
 
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LXPlot

Active Member
Question though on what you mean by programmer. I PRESUME you are talking about light board programming?

I have programmed cues in, with timing and intensity and such, but isn't there more to it than that? I wasn't sure if I had as much experience doing any more than that, so I left it off.

Also, I do have COMPUTER programming experience, is that worth putting on a theatre resume? Is knowing Basic, Java, HTML, Python, or Ada computing languages helpful?

Computer programming might be something you could list if you have room; however, don't list it in specifics, just list that you have a moderate amount of practice doing it.

By programming I meant lighting console programmer. However, I was not simply talking about basic cue lists. This should be included if you plan on doing anything lighting involving moving lights/ anything controlled by your console that is not a dimmer. If you have never done this and didn't include it for this reason, than it may be of some benefit to your application to learn how and do it.

I'm also going to renege my previous statement saying that you should be knowledgeable of saws and replace it with "Skilled with power tools."
 

Footer

Senior Team
Senior Team
Premium Member
Computer programming might be something you could list if you have room; however, don't list it in specifics, just list that you have a moderate amount of practice doing it.

I actually strongly disagree with that. List what languages you can program and and what level. To me, this shows you have a logical mind and can think beyond a single task. No, you won't be asked to program C++ in the scene shop, but it does show aptitude.

And yes, ref's should also be on the same page. A resume' without ref's is useless and you don't want your resume' to hinge on a staple or someone remembering to pull both pages out of a printer. You don't have enough stuff at this point to warrant more then one page. When you have enough stuff, you'll know, and also probably no longer need a resume'.
 

erichart

Member
I believe propsmaster is one word, the other shouldn't have dashes.
"Prop Master" or "Props Master" is two words. Alternatively, you can write out the full "Property Master".
 

drewski91

Member
Some humble notes on your newest draft, from a fellow undergrad who is obsessive about his résumé:

-I don't typically see "objective" on theatre resumes. Not that it is a bad thing necessarily, but it certainly isn't required or expected.
-What is your primary position? It seems odd to have run crew listed first. If you're going to break things down in categories by job like that, I would but more impressive positions first. Run crew would be last.
-"Lighting designer and programmer" is redundant, especially at the community theatre/university level. Just say "lighting designer."
-Just my opinion... i WOULD make some kind of "on hiatus" note by your Truman State line. That will let them know that you plan on finishing at some point, which you could explain in an interview. Right now, I would assume that you dropped out.
-The sentences in your skills section should be in sentence case, not title case (don't capitalize every word, i.e., "Can Learn New Programs and Systems Quickly,
Have Worked in Linux Environments")
-Put your theatre skills first, and your computer skills second. Your computer skills aren't bad to have on there... but your theatre skills are FAR more important.


Personally, i'm in a position somewhat like yours-- in that my experience is somewhat limited, and it crosses many departments (design, SM, electrics, producing...) and the standard résumé format just doesn't work for me if I want to show that off (which, at this point in my career, I do). So it might be helpful for you to see how I've done it. Mine is far from perfect, and I'm still tweaking it daily, but here it is:
Drew Kowalkowski : Résumé
 
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Honestly, the reason I decided to have run-crew first on this draft...is the job I am designing this for is Run-crew. I plan on moving them around depending on which job I am sending it too.

But I see your point on that.

As far as objective...I've heard/seen a lot about that. My professor that taught up here prior to her having her second child, taught a Stage Management course (every once in a while) and in it her biggest advice regarding resumes was ONE page and Objective.

And the objective bit she actually said to put what I'm working TOWARDS in my career, so TD. I've decided to keep it on here for now, because as Footer said, I don't have a lot of stuff to warrant making more than one page, but while I DO have the space I'm going to have it on there if sending it out to several places. And then listed my short-term career goal.

Your other tips/advice, I have noted and will change on it, thanks! :)
 

Mercedes

Member
I know this has been stated, but I don't think you need an objective for your resume. That is what your cover letter is for. Your cover letter is basically a couple of short paragraphs expanding on your resume and/or telling them a little about yourself that you want them to know.
 

thorin81

Active Member
I concur in regards to lenght - ONE PAGE ONLY!! Do not ever go over one page. No one wants to read a novel about you...

In regards to references - drop as many names as possible for a potential employer to call. From directors you have worked with (particularly since you have been in an academic environment) to supervisors at other theatres, or academic advisors. You want to give a potential employer as many POSITIVE opportunities to talk about you and your work as possible. In general, put your best self (and those that will support that) on the resume. If it does not make you look good, DON'T include it!!

You may want to list a column on teh resume of directors, TDs, Admin, etc. that are associated with the work that you have done.
 
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