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Discussion in 'Wiki' started by derekleffew, May 30, 2008.

  1. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Las Vegas, NV, USA
    A revolve or turntable is typically a large circular area of staging designed spin around a central axis either in one direction, or both. Turntables come in many varieties: Human-powered (manual), Chain-driven, Hydraulic, Direct-Drive Electric and Wheel-Driven Electric. Posted with this article you will find a design for a small, 16' diameter, manually-operated portable, turntable. No matter what the motivation all turntables share several key components.
    1. A central axis around which the scenery revolves.
    2. A surface support system, typically non-swivel casters either attached to the underside of the revolve surface or to the floor beneath the turntable.
    3. a Keying, or cueing system.

    The central axis of a turntable can be as simple as two pieces of pipe which slip over each other or as complex as the shaft of a hydraulic motor. In either case the key to a good axis is lubrication and freedom of rotation and strength withstand the torsional loads imposed by the rotation of the turntable. If you look at the attached drawings you will notice that even for a small scale revolve the central axis is comprised of 2" scd. #40 pipe and flanges this provides a ample amount of surface area to spread out the shear forces and help transform them into rotational forces. In a portable revolve set-up, securing the central hub is crucial to the performance and safe operation of the revolve.
    The support system of the attached design consists of radial arms with non-swivel casters attached. The arms are secured to each other with either a hook and eye set up or a clamp locking system such as those manufactured by De-Sta-Co in either case the arms should be secured to the floor at the ends by a screw or other mechanical means. Casters should always be mounted upside down, that is, with the wheels riding on the underside of the decking material. This will greatly reduce noise due to uneven loading of the turntable.
    Some revolves employ no caster supports what-so-ever and instead use either steel beams or rely on the strength of of the decking material alone to support the load to be carried.

    Thread with links to plans and pictures: .

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 12, 2008

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