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Rigging Education Video

Discussion in 'Education and Career Development' started by StradivariusBone, Jul 24, 2017.

  1. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @Jay Ashworth Jay; I've never known how to begin and end quotes.
    What I normally do is work around / within the existing quotes. In the case of the post you're referencing, "Over-all: A+" was / is from Erich's post. I jumped in after his opening and typed my post. I believe I then deleted the remainder of Erich's post and retained the original end quote. I see what you're saying and now understand where and how I blew it.
    Thanks for calling this to my attention.
    Being blind, it took me well over an hour to type my post. Sometime while I was typing, a flag popped up warning:
    "The following error occurred: 504 Gateway Time-out" (cloudflare-nginx) [As has just happened again this instant.]
    I've neither any idea what this means nor what action I need to take. It always concerns me as I wonder if it means my typing's been for nought. After the error warning, I left clicked my mouse and was able to continue typing, eventually completing my post although, try as I might, I couldn't make my final call-outs to Bill and Mike work. My call-out at the beginning, long before the error mesage, worked but I tried at least three times each near the end of my post and had great difficulty in trying to get the call-outs to work
    Any enlightenment you can provide is ALWAYS appreciated.
    Thanks again.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard.
     
  2. Jay Ashworth

    Jay Ashworth Well-Known Member

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    Cloudflare is an incoming proxy service that CB uses to avoid DDoS attacks.

    I don't know how it interacts with leaving an editor window up for a couple hours.

    How big a monitor do you have, and how much residual vision? Do you use a screenreader?
     
  3. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @Jay Ashworth
    1; What's a "Proxy service"?
    2: What's a "DDoS attack" and what manner of pain would it inflict upon me?
    3; My monitor's roughly 22 - 23" diagonally. I purchased this monitor when my original Dell / Sony 19" flat front CRT died prior to my mini-stroke and it's turned out to be a fortuitous choice. Contrary to what you'd instinctively think, smaller is better for me in the sense that I can manage to pull together portions of a screen image in my mind's eye and manage to deal with my PC. I can never encompass my existing monitor's display in any one gaze at any time and some days / times are worse.
    Regardless of which eye is open, I have essentially a sharply focused shutter cut coming in from SR on a slight angle as if it were cut in a little further US than DS. This "shutter" from SR is with me all the time thus heaven help anyone who approaches silently from my left as they're likely to find themselves in collision with me if I'm walking and / or if they're standing to my left when I begin gesticulating while conversing. In my remaining field of view, I still have my peripheral vision to my right but my vision consists of a varying number of a variety of sizes of black holes with me trying to pull an image together from the fragments I manage to focus on surrounding the several holes. I've worn tri-focals for decades and still do. Without my tri-focals I'd be in serious trouble and this was prior to my Sunday July 20th 2014 mini-stroke. I went to bed sometime early Sunday morning, probably between two and four a.m. only to awake Sunday morning to find my vision and balance radically compromised. Our master bedroom was 16' x 21'. It was a Sunday morning, after I'd been burning my 'candle' from both ends all week, and I hadn't needed to set my alarm planning to sleep until I woke up of my own accord. I crashed to the carpet before I made it to the bedroom door and twice more prior to relieving myself in front of our toilet in the classic male 'standing position'. My second crash landing found me wondering why I was laying on my left side with my back against the shower and my lips kissing the side of our toilet's base. I clawed my way up to standing and my third crash landing really hurt. Trust me, you don't want to come down hard on the sharp corner of a solid-surfaced vanity. When I awoke on the Sunday morning lying in bed, I had no indication anything had occurred deeply within my skull; no headache, no pain, no discomfort of any kind. I was used to waking up bleary eye'd but always slipped my glasses on immediately upon sitting up in bed. I was my normal, just woke up, bleary eyed self wondering why I was on the carpet looking up immediately prior to exiting into our 2nd floor hall. I'm a life-long total abstainer thus I wasn't suffering the after effects of a wild party. When my family got me to emergency, the triage nurse ran all her normal checks and didn't discover anything too undue. My BP was a little low but my doctor'd always described my normal BP as being on the low side of the normal range. I had no 'left side' vs. 'right side' signs of paralysis and no signs of any discomfort aside from the emerging bruise the vanity corner delivered to my tummy. Triage having accorded me a low priority, I walked down a hall to use one of Emergency's toilets and darn near damaged their terrazzo floor on my way back. I knew how hard their terrazzo was as I was in a wing of the hospital I'd helped renovate during my electrical apprenticeship back in the sixties. Trust me: Terrazzo poured, ground and polished on slab over "undisturbed soil" construction is a hard and extremely durable floor surface you don't want to argue with. Fortunately an Emergency RN happened to see me as I went from walking pretty much normally to crashing down hard on my left side and came running to ensure I didn't try to move on my own. The RN summoned two helpers, checked me for broken bones, took my BP again, got me up and seated and informed triage that she must've missed something. In less than 30 minutes I was on a gurney in Emerge' and 74 days later I walked out of the hospital.
    I've digressed. Sorry, I'm good at digression. I was scanned multiple times, including at least two ultra-sounds, two Cat scans and two extremely loud MRI's and they finally thought they caught site of where a minor bleed had occurred deep within my skull but the best they could tell me was it was in an inoperable location and there would be no recovery of my vision on the horizon as there were no alternate paths to be developed / created.
    It's resulted in an overnight radical change in my life and that's putting it mildly:
    No eye-hand coordination.
    No precision soldering.
    No component level PC repairs.
    No focusing lights
    No setting cues.
    No wonderfully subtle long running slow cross fades from evening to midnight over the course of an act.
    No scissor lifts, zoom booms, or trestle ladders and NO DRIVING.
    I can't watch TV as it's mostly rapidly moving images and I can't capture an entire screen in any one gaze let alone any one forty or fifty foot prosc'.
    I have a tiny 14" TV but the last time I had it on I was listening to The Donald's election results.
    ( I will admit to enjoying some of his duets with Hilary on YouTube as I could manage to enjoy them on my PC and repeat segments as many times as I liked.)
    Residual vision you asked:
    Well, it is what it is and I'll explain it thus:
    Near the end of my 74 consecutive days in hospital, an RN perilously close to retirement asked me how I was going to deal with my radically altered vision and my answer caught her totally off guard when I said:
    "Well, there's good and there's bad and I find it best not to dwell on the negatives.
    On the negative side, I'm missing out on a lot of seriously hot young RN's.
    While on the positive side, the majority of your more mature staff are benefitting greatly from how I now view my world."
    There was about a beat and a half pause while the aged RN cogitated and then she SPLATTERED frantically apologizing for laughing after having just met me upon coming on shift. I immediately laughed WITH her and assured her laughter was not only O.K. but one of the joys of my life and how it pleased me to have gotten her 12 hour shift off on a high note. Over the following 12 hours, and the next couple of shift changes, there were always little clusters of nurses huddling outside my door with one pointing and the remainder peeking as word spread through the ward of this odd-ball old geezer who'd made one of their senior RN's darned near wet herself while convulsing in laughter.
    With apologies for droning on @Jay Ashworth but that's pretty much all I can tell you about my vision and how I deal with it.
    You asked me about a "screenreader". If this is a feature in XP in which some little robotic / synthetic voice recites each keystroke as you make it, my closest computer nerd suggested it was something I'd find helpful and enabled it during one of his visits without telling me about it. The next time I used my PC the droning little voice STARTLED the heck out of me! I compose what I write in my head prior to typing and the danged little mono-toned parrot kept distracting the heck out of me. Chuck received a near immediate e-mail BEGGING How the heck do I turn this thing off? My speakers are always on as I depend upon them to notify me of the arrival of e-mails along with warnings at 11:45 p.m. and midnight for items requiring attention prior to end of day / first thing the next day thus I didn't want to turn my speakers off but OH HOW DISTURBING that little mono-toned nuisance was. I was SO relieved when an e-mail arrived telling me how to silence the little phuquer.
    Take care Sir and thanks for asking / helping.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
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  4. venuetech

    venuetech Well-Known Member

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    I use ring placement as sort of a quick ID clue. In your case I would move the ring to the top/tip of the brake handle to indicate that is the lineset to work with. Other nearby rings should be in the normal notched position or even all the way at the base of the handle. So it is more effort to remove the ring. This works nice for quick scene changes as I can prep ID the linesets involved in that change to a high ring position. Sets that do not move during the show have the ring at the base.
     
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  5. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    We pause now for some anecdotes and other amusing thoughts...
    In days of yore locking rings were not vinyl-coated but bare (sometimes painted (Tiffin Green(r))), and thus the first thing my first TD taught me, "I hate noise from the rail!". Those rings make a very rewarding <ping> when dropped only a few inches.
    Don't google image "locking ring". Where's the eye-bleach?
    I think waiting until the last second to remove the locking ring is a bit fearful. If the ring has to keep the lock closed, that's a different problem.
    /resume
     
  6. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

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    Occupation:
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    More likes for you, Glenn Coco. You go, Glen Coco!
     
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  7. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @What Rigger? Dare I ask? Who's Glen Coco and why do I have a feeling of impending doom heading my direction??
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard.
     
  8. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

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    Occupation:
    Polishing the brass on the Titanic.
    Location:
    Not at home, that's for sure.
    Great. Once again I'm the only adult in the room quoting Mean Girls.



    http://meangirls.wikia.com/wiki/Glen_Coco
     
  9. Jay Ashworth

    Jay Ashworth Well-Known Member

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    Aw, fetch.
     
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  10. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @RonHebbard I don't think you should feel the least bit inadequate for not recognizing Glen Coco. In fact it actually raises you credibility.
     
  11. StradivariusBone

    StradivariusBone Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    So it was brought to my attention that I inadvertently removed the original video from this thread! I've been working on the updated/final version and am almost ready to release it, but in preparation I un-unlisted the original one. I will update shortly with version 2.0. I just wanted to thank everyone again that contributed opinions and advice. I sincerely hope this is something that could be beneficial to our craft. When I started this gig, I was lacking experience in theatrical rigging as most of my practical experience came from audio and lighting. I had to learn quickly and found a few mentors that really helped me along. With that in mind, this video is a collection of that knowledge I wish I had initially walking into this world.

    Anyway, I appreciate your help and your patience. 2.0 will be out soon. Thanks!
     
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  12. StradivariusBone

    StradivariusBone Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Ok, here's the updated version! The additions and oversights definitely made for some additional length, so for those of you into the whole brevity thing I apologize. Theatre rigging is a veritable rabbit-hole of information. Though I'm beta-testing with my own techs probably tomorrow who will almost certainly be more ruthless than any of you all ;)



    I do plan to make some more tech theatre instructional videos in the relatively near future. This one took about 4-5 weeks of working off and on, so it may be a while now that school has cranked back up. In addition to the tech aspect, I also plan on just adding content to this channel with projects I do around my house. This concept was born out of several like-minded friends of mine commenting on Facebook after I fix and repair broken stuff around my house.

    Like any good business-destroying (and perpetually broke) millennial I tend to avoid calling contractors to do typical home repair when it's cost-effective and I don't need to buy a crazy amount of specialized tools. I also build things with and for my son, some of you might recall seeing the firehouse saga in the Off-Topic forum last year. Just think it will be fun to share that sort of thing with a broader audience and maybe inspire or get inspired to create cool crap.

    Anyway, I hope this might be of use to some of you! Thanks!
     
  13. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @StradivariusBone Two comments, largely continuing to 'pick nits'.
    Being blind, I perhaps listen a little closer than those with more normal vision. That said; I'm hearing a lot of variation in your audio track as it progresses past edit points. I'm not hearing any particular errors in pronunciation or phrasing but am finding variations in room tone / proximity to the mic / background reverb' those sorts of comparatively minor distractions / annoyances distracting.
    Point two; Again I'm suggesting the inclusion of a cautionary warning against overly helpful deck hands "helping" to hasten the batten's final few feet of descent to its low end of travel [EOT] point / stop block while not realizing the fly-person is most likely gently holding back on the operating line at that point and has no need to be unfairly caught off-guard by a deck hand's sudden addition of "helpful" weight / encouragement. I'm also again suggesting a cautionary warning against deck hands setting a batten in lateral motion in any direction(s) for the several reasons I've previously mentioned.
    Bottom Line: Good (Better and better) work! Great job thus far, definitely of great use to many readers.
    Hot shite or "cool crap", useful contributions to our knowledge pool are ALWAYS both useful and appreciated.
    Thanks again and please do continue.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2017
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  14. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

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    Occupation:
    Polishing the brass on the Titanic.
    Location:
    Not at home, that's for sure.
    Nice. (And Megatron made the cut!)
     
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  15. StradivariusBone

    StradivariusBone Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Just did the screening with my captive audience of high schoolers and it seems like it passed the test! My 6 year old is still trying to figure out how I mastered cloning technology.

    My sincere thanks again for all that shared information, ideas, and encouragement!

    -ED
     
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  16. Protech

    Protech Member Premium Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  17. Jay Ashworth

    Jay Ashworth Well-Known Member

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    Hey, BTW...

    Those scenes around 14 minutes with the arbor weights.

    Are those steel-toe sneakers? :)
     
  18. JChenault

    JChenault Well-Known Member

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    Overall quite nice. One nit. Is the rail you attach your harness to load roared for the shock load?
     
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  19. StradivariusBone

    StradivariusBone Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Yup. They are Keen's which I actually found recommended somewhere on here. Much lighter than my other steel-toe boots and just as resilient to gravity induced toe injury. I love 'em!

    I got a couple other eagle-eye's in the PM's that noticed that as well. I asked our ETCP rigging contractor about that a ways back and he said he didn't see too much of an issue with it, but still recommended we have him install a safety line (if for no other reason than to make it easier to stay clipped in while working the loading rail). Like all things in education, this is moving at a snail pace, but it is something we're working at.
     
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