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Rigging ideas please?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by stradivarius, Dec 10, 2006.

  1. stradivarius

    stradivarius Member

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    Hi,
    I don't now if this would be the right forum for this question, but anyway:
    I currently designing a small/medium sized rig for a band and the lighting is based on hanging on 4 separate trusses standing on the floor. One problem I've come up with is how I am supposed to rig these trusses so they won't fall, as I'm not used to work with standing trusses. Anyone have a clue to how the problem could be solved.
    Each truss consist of 1 Mac 500, 1 Mac 600, 1 atomic 3000 strobe, 1 4-light blinder and a par 64 sixbar.
    Adding a picture of what I have in mind.
    Thanks for the help :)
     

    Attached Files:

  2. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Most truss manufacturers offer oversized base plates. If your truss is 12" square a 3' x 3' steel base plate will accomodate your application. The addition of sand bags on the base plate will guard against the truss falling if someone bumps into it.
     
  3. Pie4Weebl

    Pie4Weebl Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    other pieces of truss can be held up with outriggers that attach to the base, but I think Bill's idea will look better.
     
  4. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Being the safety freak that I am in cases like this, I'd definitely go with a large baseplate and four small (4' or so) outriggers attached to the corners of the truss.
     
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Gotta go with sound light on this one, especially if your new to rigging this type of rig. I couldn't get scale off your drawing, How tall are the truss, just one 10' section ? Would it be possible to run a pipe across the tops of them with cheesburgers to provide more lateral support ? perhaps providing more area for hanging as well unless your using prewired 6bars that is.
     
  6. Jezza

    Jezza Active Member

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    Oversised baseplates and outriggers are both great ideas, in addition, a safety line up to the grid or any piece of steel close will give you just that much more added protection. Never sacrifice simplicity or esthetics for safety I always say.
     
  7. TechiGoz

    TechiGoz Active Member

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    All posts so far are heading down the right track. Since you are hanging, and are new to this type of rigging, a Base plate with sandbags, outriggers and possibly a wire up to the grid would probably be sufficient to make sure it doesn't fall.

    After working with upright stage truss for a while, your design looks good, as you are balancing the weight at the top by hanging them off a cross bar. Some support on the base though is definately a must have to ensure it doesn't get knocked over.

    Soundlight and Jezza were right with their additional saftey aspects. You've got a fair bit of weight with the Atomic Strobe, blinder and cans on the front, but the truss should handle that fine.

    Good Luck
     
  8. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    "Cheesburgers" That's awesome Van, I'm dying over here. Maybe I have just lead a sheltered life when it comes to rigging truss but I haven't heard that one before. I love it and swear to use it from this day forward.
     
  9. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry I have no idea what a cheeseburger is unless I buy it at McDonalds, Could you please explain. Pardon my ignorance
     
  10. kovacika

    kovacika Active Member

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    A cheeseburger is actually a cheeseboro- a clamp used for holding two pieces of pipe together. They come in rotable and fixed 90 degree forms. A very useful thing to have around.
     

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    Logos likes this.
  11. stradivarius

    stradivarius Member

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    Thank's for all your ideas and advices, I was actually thinking in that direction, but it's always good to hear someone else's ideas and comments, especially when it comes to safety. :)

    Edit: "Cheeseburgers" are a great idea!
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2006
  12. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    HEHEHE Glad I could brighten your day:mrgreen: Sorry I just get so used to using colloquialisms I forget we all often differ in our references to hardware etc. BTW remember that while swivel-burgers are really handy that are free rotating and not real good for lateral bracing unless locked from another vector, and even then they have some slop in them. If anybody has a good "inexpensive" supplier I'd love to have a link. I have a severe lack of them at my theatre, and most of the local supplier want way too much for them.
    There is also a clamp useed on a lot of fixtures that is called a "pro-burger" it's aluminum and not really for pipe rigging.
     
  13. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. I've always called anything that does that job in any shape a scaff clamp.
     
  14. Andrewr

    Andrewr Member

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    What has worked really well for me:

    I did something similar recently, just with 16 Par64's up the sides and a Mac250E perched on top, 3m high in all.

    Solution; 2 scaff tower outriggers, we already had them, but they should be cheap and easy to get hold of. I only had small base plates and to be fair even 3'x3' ones aren't as good... The outriggers are designed for an 8m tower, they clamp on about 6' up the truss, you can then weight them with anything sutible. Put them 90 degrees apart and you have 3 points of stability. Unless someone climbs the truss you will be fine. (I could hide the outriggers behind our blacks tabs)
     
  15. cue1go

    cue1go Member

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    I'd go with a large base and plenty of sand bags. Consult the rental house you'll be renting the gear from, and they should have some suggestions.
     
  16. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Here's a couple of pic to show how some are doing it.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Bill, I got a message of "Sorry but you are not authorised to view or download this attachment"
     

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