Road Assembly Plans

Hutcoy

Member
Hey All,

I've never built a show to road before that I will not be there to install. (Other Producer is too cheap for a set tech) What kind of paperwork should I generate to help the install team to put the thing back together other than all of the labeling we're doing on the scenery itself and my construction drawings? Or is it expected for the install tech to figure it out with only that information?

Background info: wraparound unit set with lots of stairs, an upper level walk around, curved walls, that reside in a tracked platform (no automation). Its traveling in an 53' truck (I've already done the truck pack). The reassembly requires what you would expect: coffin locks, french cleats, and butterfly nuts with bolts. Should be able to install in 2 hours with a crew of 6.

Any examples of paperwork would be appreciated or advice from the end users of getting such a package with no set tech.

Thanks!
 

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Senior Team
Senior Team
Premium Member
Plenty of pictures and a case of beer.... and an extra hammer to throw at that producer for being a cheapskate. Also, tell them its going to take at least 4x to install vs what you think now... because it will. The one set I ever rented that did not come with a tech it took us 3x as long to install then when we had a tech.
 

RonHebbard

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Hey All,

I've never built a show to road before that I will not be there to install. (Other Producer is too cheap for a set tech) What kind of paperwork should I generate to help the install team to put the thing back together other than all of the labeling we're doing on the scenery itself and my construction drawings? Or is it expected for the install tech to figure it out with only that information?

Background info: wraparound unit set with lots of stairs, an upper level walk around, curved walls, that reside in a tracked platform (no automation). Its traveling in an 53' truck (I've already done the truck pack). The reassembly requires what you would expect: coffin locks, french cleats, and butterfly nuts with bolts. Should be able to install in 2 hours with a crew of 6.

Any examples of paperwork would be appreciated or advice from the end users of getting such a package with no set tech.

Thanks!
Do you have a ground cloth as part of your set? (With all manner of colored spikes on it of course?) If not, have you considered it? An amateur group in my area used to compete in competitive festivals on an annual basis. Last thing into the truck was their floor cloth as two rolls; one roll being 12' wide by the width of their stage and the second roll being the next 12' U/S. Arrive at the venue, sweep the deck. Unroll the D/S carpet and line up the center line with the venue's center line. While accurately securing the first roll, unroll the second. Run a continuous length of tape across the joint between the two cloths and stand the set pieces on their spikes. Occasionally they'd do a set with a playing area deeper than 24' and have a third roll of carpet.
Worked like a charm and every few years they'd purchase a new floor cloth, usually low pile indoor outdoor carpeting in a tasteful color. Depending upon various set designs, area rugs were often added on top to delineate living rooms et al.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard.
 

Hutcoy

Member
Do you have a ground cloth as part of your set? (With all manner of colored spikes on it of course?) If not, have you considered it? An amateur group in my area used to compete in competitive festivals on an annual basis. Last thing into the truck was their floor cloth as two rolls; one roll being 12' wide by the width of their stage and the second roll being the next 12' U/S. Arrive at the venue, sweep the deck. Unroll the D/S carpet and line up the center line with the venue's center line. While accurately securing the first roll, unroll the second. Run a continuous length of tape across the joint between the two cloths and stand the set pieces on their spikes. Occasionally they'd do a set with a playing area deeper than 24' and have a third roll of carpet.
Worked like a charm and every few years they'd purchase a new floor cloth, usually low pile indoor outdoor carpeting in a tasteful color. Depending upon various set designs, area rugs were often added on top to delineate living rooms et al.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard.


Sadly, no show deck of any kind. It is designed to be on a black stage floor. Otherwise, We would have make our markings on the floor to go with all the other note's we've sharpied onto it.
 

josh88

Remarkably Tired.
Premium Member
Fight Leukemia
I second lots of pictures, labeling that is clear to you. Going over with whoever labeled it/assembled it the first time/took it apart to be sure you're on the same page for when you're the one putting it together later. We always send the ground plans with our stuff and at least one person who has an idea.
 

Van

CBMod
CB Mods
Premium Member
This might sound crazy but I've seen it done locally and it works like a dream. Think Lighting. Yeah make a "focus tape" out of jute webbing. You can then label points along the tape from the CL. The Portland Opera uses a couple permanent points in their rehearsal rooms. The triangulate points on the deck off of points pre-measured on the ground Plan. They can spike a full-stage opera in No time. It works well for on the road too.
The last unit I built for Wynn casino in Macau had lots of pictures with LOTS of arrows.
(and if I do say so myself I got a report back that the thing went together "like a dream")
Consistent Labeling Nomenclature!
I cannot stress enough that you maintain consistency through the entire build. Letters, Numbers, Symbols whatever you use use the same thing for every unit. Don't label one unit with playing card suits and numbers and the next unit with Colored geometric shapes...<yes, I had a set show up like that>
 

RonHebbard

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
This might sound crazy but I've seen it done locally and it works like a dream. Think Lighting. Yeah make a "focus tape" out of jute webbing. You can then label points along the tape from the CL. The Portland Opera uses a couple permanent points in their rehearsal rooms. The triangulate points on the deck off of points pre-measured on the ground Plan. They can spike a full-stage opera in No time. It works well for on the road too.
The last unit I built for Wynn casino in Macau had lots of pictures with LOTS of arrows.
(and if I do say so myself I got a report back that the thing went together "like a dream")
Consistent Labeling Nomenclature!
I cannot stress enough that you maintain consistency through the entire build. Letters, Numbers, Symbols whatever you use use the same thing for every unit. Don't label one unit with playing card suits and numbers and the next unit with Colored geometric shapes...<yes, I had a set show up like that>
A cloth "focus tape" laid U/S - D/S on the center line beginning from the curtain line used to be a very common thing for picking fly pipes in my road-house days long before self-levelling LASER's. No! Not before light!! I'm old but not quite that old.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard.
 

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