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Runaway

Discussion in 'Stage Management and Facility Operations' started by Footer, Dec 26, 2008.

  1. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Just got this sent to me from one of my friends who is out on tour with a large broadway show. Yes, it did happen while they were onstage, and yes the show did go on.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2009
  2. rochem

    rochem Well-Known Member

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    *saving this photo to scare people who think you can hang anything without reweighting*

    Wow, that's kinda scary. Do you know what caused the runaway? Since it's arbor heavy, I assume the loaders must have just been a little too eager to add weight or something during load-in. What was the show (if you're allowed to say)? Was anything damaged? And what did OSHA/IA/Equity think about continuing the show with that damage hanging overhead?
     
  3. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    I would guess a very heavy object was flown in, object was taken off the batten, and a now very arbor heavy batten comes crashing to the rail.
     
  4. photoatdv

    photoatdv Active Member

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    I should show this to my drama teacher who thinks reweighing is optional... no wait, we have one (not quite that bad, the arbors just slightly bent and the block look pretty much okay) in our auditorium... in fact he caused it. What was the bast was that nobody checked the pipe side of the system (which was hanging over our heads). Don't worry, I looked it it when I was up at the grid last year and it looks fine-- but the point is someone (preferably a rigger) should have looked it it when it happened. I fact I think we could use it the way it is if we took off the extra 300lbs of weight.

    As far as the broadway show continuing, I'm sure they had experienced riggers/ flymen on the show that checked the system and secured anything that was an immediate danger. At least I hope so becuase I wouldn't trust the lines still being securely attached to that arbor, not to mention whatever happened to the pipe and grid.

    Actually, do you have a picture of the grid after that one?
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2008
  5. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Nope, I won't say the show. It was supposed to be a pipe that married to an electic, and was weighted before the pipe was married.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  6. Wolf

    Wolf Active Member

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    I'v heard this term before and I only have an idea of what exactly it means. Does it mean that the batten was going to used with the electric (as if cables were going to be going from the electric to this batten). If this is the case is that all it is?
     
  7. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    No, its a weight thing. Most battens out there, in a single purchase system are weighted for under a 1000#, some double purchase systems can hold no more then 500# to 700#. Broadway style touring shows usually pull in all of their fixtures mounted on unistrut and cable with socapex mults. This weighs a lot, in some places more then a single batten can hold. Common practice is to "marry" two battens together by chaining them together and use two arbors to carry the weight.

    *THE ABOVE SHOULD ONLY BE DONE BY A QUALIFIED RIGGER*


    What happened in this instance, is the flyman brought both pipes in. Unistrut was hung on the batten while the arbor was being loaded. Before the battens were married, they compltelty loaded the arbor of the "helper" pipe. The rope or the brake failed droping the arbor 60' to the deck, and taking the batten out at a high speed. The arbor crashed into the deck.
     
  8. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    And this is the wrong approach, for many reasons.

    A Qualified Rigger should/would do it differently.
     
  9. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    Im pretty sure hes saying that you shouldn't marry and pipes together at anytime. An experienced rigger would figure out a way to hang the unistrut without cutting corners.

    I don't see any problem with it as long as your arbors are married as well. Wouldn't be so good if you get on of the arbors traveling faster than the other
     
  10. photoatdv

    photoatdv Active Member

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    Footer and Derek arguing... we need to put out a news flash!
     
  11. theatretechguy

    theatretechguy Member

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    It must have been a rope failure on the arbor, I can't see any experienced rigger thinking that the brake would support that much weight in ANY venue. Scary stuff. Glad nobody was hurt (or killed).
     
  12. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

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    Well...I'm certainly not gonna chime in. Not THIS time at least.

    :p
     
  13. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Now THAT"S worthy of a news flash !!!

    :twisted::mrgreen::twisted:
     
  14. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I don't think derek and I are arguing about this one. This was a mistake on a rather large scale with a well trained crew. It was merely a communication problem that should have been taken care of. Beyond that, it should not have been done to begin with.

    The battens were going to be married, and because of that, the arbor was loaded before the pipe were married, the rope or brake failed, and the arbor fell.
     
  15. Sayen

    Sayen Active Member

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    No pause in performance for an inspection? What did the audience do when that thing came crashing down?
     
  16. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    We've had some good debates around here in the past about use of the word "brake" vs "lock". In the end the key to always remember is that brake doesn't prevent the arbor from moving. It's providing enough friction to help a properly weighted arbor resist movement... that's all. The only truly "locked" arbor is one that is chained down. Anything else is always subject to massive failure if it gets dramatically out of balance.

    Hey Footer the original picture is no longer in your post. Can you repost it?
     

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