Scaffold for followspots

RonHebbard

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Waterdown, ON, CA
info on Scaffold for followspot size safe height, riggings.....if have pic would be good... for outside, and indoors
Queries:
- What size & type of follow spot; a Source 4 with an iris, a Strong Super Trouper, something in between from Robert Julliat (Sp?)?
- How big, how heavy?? Operated by an 80 pound child or a 300+ pound gorilla???
_ How high is your stage????
_ In a comparatively protected area or next to a lake or ocean?????
- Toe / kick boards on all four sides.
- Drainage provided for rain, sleet, or snow.
- Rubber matting, or similar, for good traction when wet.
- Ash bucket for smokers.
- Garbage can for flamable trash.
- Liquid tight bucket for when 'nature calls'.
- An appropriate height stool for comfort while operating on long days / nights.
- Lighting at floor level for operation post sunset.
- Safety harness and suitable fall arrest lanyard.
- Rated tie off points, not a handrail.
A few thoughts to get you started.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 
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What Rigger?

I'm so fly....I Neverland.
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@willie odom sr , welcome to ControlBooth! Make sure to drop us a quick line in the New Member thread to introduce yourself to everyone. We're glad you're here!

Your vendor (you do have one, right? Because renting/assembly of scaffolding by untrained persons is begging for injury and litigation) will need to consider the type of surface is it going on. Soil- what kind? Concrete? Turf? Is the surface level or is there a grade? Your vendor may also want to consider ballast and what is the maximum wind-load expected. For indoor applications, will the floor be able to accomodate the loads placed on it without damage from the weight of the scaffold, gear on it, and the people running the gear.
Is there a rescue plan for getting an incapacitated individual down from the platform- keeping in mind that "call 911" is not a rescue plan in many states.
The height of your scaffold will partially be influenced by the height of the stage, and the distance from the follow spots to the stage.

Your request seems to lack some dimension to it. More information might help us be able to steer you in the right direction. What additional details can you give us?
Google shows a plethora of scaffolding rental operations in the Houston area. Starting with any of them may be your best bet.
Definintely have a look at the documents that @RickR has linked for you.
 

gafftaper

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I've used scaffolding several times both for follow spots and for set pieces. Just call your local scaffold rental shop and talk to them about what you want to do and they will help you design something that will best fit your needs and be sure it's all done safely.
 

geoffrey hugh

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Oct 4, 2016
Location
new york city
Queries:
- What size & type of follow spot; a Source 4 with an iris, a Strong Super Trouper, something in between from Robert Julliat (Sp?)?
- How big, how heavy?? Operated by an 80 pound child or a 300+ pound gorilla???
_ How high is your stage????
_ In a comparatively protected area or next to a lake or ocean?????
- Toe / kick boards on all four sides.
- Drainage provided for rain, sleet, or snow.
- Rubber matting, or similar, for good traction when wet.
- Ash bucket for smokers.
- Garbage can for flamable trash.
- Liquid tight bucket for when 'nature calls'.
- An appropriate height stool for comfort while operating on long days / nights.
- Lighting at floor level for operation post sunset.
- Safety harness and suitable fall arrest lanyard.
- Rated tie off points, not a handrail.
A few thoughts to get you started.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
I agree with commenters who suggest you should think ‘safety’ almost to the point of extremism.

The risks taken back in the day are frightening to think about now. Take a look at the basic scaffold used at Woodstock in 1969 (screen shot taken from an online video). There are plenty of stagehands on this board who worked setups like that. And in those days everything was a heavy carbon arc which often bobbed and swayed on a flimsy plywood ‘floor.

It got worse when stagehands were required to climb circus ladders to get to an overhead truss grid (like on a touring R&R show), then walk on top of the cable that covered the truss to get to their spot perch which could have been 50 feet away or more. No handrails, no safety anything. Most people crawled. Just getting from the ladder to the truss, in either direction, was treacherous.

So design your version to code, any state code, and if you’re told to cut the budget, tell the bosses to cut either the budget of another department, or cut the follow spots.

It was very macho, back in the day—still, you had to be brave. There’s no need for that now, and wasn’t back then either.

And, Mr Hebbard is wise in suggesting such a small detail as a kick plate surround, for example. It provides a barrier to things on the floor from falling off as well as a dose of psychological security, if you know what I mean.
 

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TimMc

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Woodstock? I can hook you up with Bill Hanley on Saturday's PNW Chapter of the Audio Engineering Society zoom. He's discussed some details of Chip Monk's lighting rig at the festival.
 

avkid

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Woodstock? I can hook you up with Bill Hanley on Saturday's PNW Chapter of the Audio Engineering Society zoom.
I haven't talked to Bill in years, he's such a great resource on the early history of the audio business.
 
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TimMc

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I haven't talked to Bill in years, he's such a great resource on the early history of the audio business.
He's quite the treasure, pioneering many of the methods we still use. He's still in audio and his brother is still involved in staging.
 

avkid

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He's quite the treasure, pioneering many of the methods we still use. He's still in audio and his brother is still involved in staging.
With their hydraulic beast, 20 years ahead of it's time.
One of my favorite clients works with Terry.
 
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TimMc

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With their hydraulic beast, 20 years ahead of it's time.
One of my favorite clients works with Terry.
Last week, Bill was talking about their hydraulic stage, over 120 pistons and 5,000 feet of high pressure hoses.

Anyone interested in the (mostly) audio side of historic East Coast festivals or just wants to hang out with some really fun and sharp folks can click below.

 

RonHebbard

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Location
Waterdown, ON, CA
Woodstock? I can hook you up with Bill Hanley on Saturday's PNW Chapter of the Audio Engineering Society zoom. He's discussed some details of Chip Monk's lighting rig at the festival.
I suspect you could hook him up with Bill Hayley And The Comets as well.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 

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