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Screwgun Cart

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by Charc, Nov 13, 2008.

  1. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    So I handed this in 20 minutes ago, but I thought I might post it here for critique.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. arik52

    arik52 Member

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    I think it's a really good idea. Your design is solid, and I like the ideas a lot. My questions: do you really only have 6 different sizes of screws that you'll have one per bin? And for bits, what's the point of having different trays? I suppose if you wanted to separate screw bits/drill bits/spade bits/hole saws... I just think you may want to have an organization plan if your building areas for organization into the design.

    Oh, and you were right. 1/4" ply is a better choice than 1/4" lauan for this case. What's a dado'ed groove, and how do you plan on gluing the ply into it? 1x would be much easier to attach than ply, but it would be thicker. I don't know the groove method though... maybe that'll work out great?

    What I don't understand at all is the battery area. Is that actually in the cart, or just an area on top? Keep in mind that if it's an area on top, it won't be locked. Also, you may want to build in organization for need to be charged/charging/fully charged batteries.

    EDIT: If you have any door hardware lying around from previous sets, I'd suggest using those hinges, they'll open more than 180 degrees.
     
  3. sk8rsdad

    sk8rsdad Well-Known Member Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    Consider putting the tool bays on the bottom and the screw bins on the top. I typically search for screws more frequently than I reach for a screwgun and all the bending over is hard on an old guy's back.
     
  4. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    The tool bay shelf may need a lip of some sort to prevent the tools from bouncing out (or up to the doors, and then falling out when you open them) as you move the cart.

    Joe
     
  5. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    An excellent suggestion.

    I don't think 1/2" ply, even if using Baltic Birch, has the strength and rigidity for what you want, not to mention the weak butt joints. I'd use 3/4" instead of the 1/2". 1/4" ply is fine for partitions. You might consider not gluing them in the grooves to allow for adjustability. ("Dado'ed groove" is redundant/contradictory. According to most wood butchers, a dado is a channel against the grain, and a groove is with the grain.)

    Sabre saw blades?:rolleyes:
     
  6. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    I think, if it's AC or BC 1/2" should be fine, provided the dado's are glued and screwed, or at the least pinned in place from the inside. The unit is going to get most of it's shear strength from the attachment of the back so those connections are important as well.

    As for the Dado / Groove debate, unfortunately these terms get so interchanged now days as to be almost indistinguishable. However As Derek pointed out a Dado is, specifically a three sided cut across the grain of a peice of wood, however, I myself am guilty of using dado as a verb refering to the use of a Dado blade as in; " I'm going to be dado-ing a channel into this peice of wood." while this might not be a correct use of the term it does, none the less get used. Oddly enough My MC and I were just having a conversation last night about the difference between a dado, a rabbet, and a slot. Man do we wood butchers have fun.
     
  7. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I wasn't making fun. If you didn't want constructive [pun!] criticism, you shouldn't have asked for it.:twisted:
    Yes, I'm sure. Ever made a butt joint with 1/2" ply? How strong was it? As to the price difference in materials, even 1/2" AC ply is garbage, so I'd use 3/4" shop grade maple veneer plywood, available here for about $45 a 4x8 sheet (from a hardwoods supplier, not a big box store). The phrases "This unit really is not that big," and "given the price difference in materials" prove my point. If the unit is not that big, the price difference in materials is immaterial [another pun!] To quote an old theatre saying: There's never enough money to do it right, but always enough to do it over. Do it right or don't do it! Why waste the labor on something that's going to fall apart? Being on wheels, this unit is going to be subjected to much abuse.

    Something I forgot the first time: your Cut List would be clearer to all involved if you would state the purpose for each piece, i.e. "carcass sides, top, big drawer bottoms," and so on. I know I often forget what a piece is for after I've cut it. It's also an easy way to make sure you haven't forgotten to document any parts. Another issue to bear in mind, which may or may not affect this project: 1/2" ply is not 1/2" thick, more like 7/16" or 15/32". 3/4" ply is usually 23/32". Will you be cutting the grooves with a router or stacked dado-head cutter?

    The grooves are only for the 1/4" partitions. He has made no provisions for reinforcing the carcass joints.

    Attached is a very similar cabinet to yours. I actually made the carcass for something else, and then repurposed it for power tool storage about four years ago.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 13, 2008

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