Wireless Sennheiser EV100 G3 945

Crisp image

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2017
Location
Eastern Victoria Australia
Hi All,
I have a Sennheiser EV100 G3 wireless mic with a 945 cart fitted.
I have not had it long and I am wondering about gain settings.
If the Rx is set to 0dB and the mic is set the same and it is to hot which should I reduce the gain on and to what level? is the level a trial and error until it is right sort of thing?
I currently have the Rx at 0dB and the mic at -36dB but until I get to play with the rest of the system it is really hard to tell.
Thanks for your help.
Regards
Geoff
 
  • Like
Reactions: RonHebbard

cekren

Active Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2012
Location
Midwest
I usually set the transmitter (handheld) gain/sensitivity as high as possible - ideally you want to be metering just below AF PEAK on the receiver during your loudest content (scrolling down/hitting the down arrow will put the receiver into "Soundcheck" mode, which holds peak values automatically, making it easier to see how your gain staging is.) I also usually leave the receiver AF out set to +18 and gain down the input at the console trim/gain as-needed. This maximizes your level through the signal chain into the console. If you have to engage your console's PAD (usually -20dB) setting, it may be better to turn down the receiver's AF out, as the PAD increases noise floor.
 

themuzicman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2007
Location
On Tour
Adding on to Cekren's post --
is the level a trial and error until it is right sort of thing?
Yes, sort of...as mentioned above, set your Receiver to +18 out (or whatever the max is) and from there it's all about setting your Transmitter gain so it's not clipping between the Transmitter and the Receiver. Great, easy enough.

The big deal with this, and the part that often gets lost in the jumble is try to gain all of your units so that they are all uniform. If all your packs are set at -10, and one singer is super dynamic and you knock that pack down to -12, go through all your other transmitters and gain them down to -12 and then gain up their corresponding input channel's preamps +2 at the console -- this allows you the ability to use any transmitter/receiver set as a spare. This is super important on a musical when you don't like surprises as A2's are running around and re-patching bad channels for you.
 

NickVon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Location
07003
Adding on to Cekren's post --
The big deal with this, and the part that often gets lost in the jumble is try to gain all of your units so that they are all uniform. If all your packs are set at -10, and one singer is super dynamic and you knock that pack down to -12, go through all your other transmitters and gain them down to -12 and then gain up their corresponding input channel's preamps +2 at the console -- this allows you the ability to use any transmitter/receiver set as a spare. This is super important on a musical when you don't like surprises as A2's are running around and re-patching bad channels for you.
Which is why the HIGH-END mic systems like Shure Axient are awesome as you can do that sensitivity adjustment on the Pack remotely from a laptop :). I'm sure the High end Sennheisers as well (though I also only have the EW100's.) Other off-brand companies have started to include variations of this features like the JTS R4 series.

If you are only dealing with a single mic though @cekren is on point.
 
Last edited:

macsound

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2018
Location
San Francisco, CA
I usually set the transmitter (handheld) gain/sensitivity as high as possible - ideally you want to be metering just below AF PEAK on the receiver during your loudest content (scrolling down/hitting the down arrow will put the receiver into "Soundcheck" mode, which holds peak values automatically, making it easier to see how your gain staging is.) I also usually leave the receiver AF out set to +18 and gain down the input at the console trim/gain as-needed. This maximizes your level through the signal chain into the console. If you have to engage your console's PAD (usually -20dB) setting, it may be better to turn down the receiver's AF out, as the PAD increases noise floor.
I tend to put my transmitter gain at -12 or -18 depending on how many choices I have. That's usually the second to lowest setting. Reason being is my talent has the potential to be loud, which means distortion. And once that transmitter is out of my hands, I can't make any changes.
Receiver however, all the way up to 0db. No sense in turning it past 0db because then you're assuming the receiver is quieter than your console's preamp.
 

Crisp image

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2017
Location
Eastern Victoria Australia
After playing a little I found the Mic at -36 and the Receiver at 0db. Seemed to work ok. Still a long way to go getting it right.A total beginner here.
 

Users who are viewing this thread