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Sennheiser EW G2/G1 backward compatibility

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by soundlight, Dec 23, 2006.

  1. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    My HS has two Sennheiser Evolution Wireless G2 systems, and two First Gen systems. One of our first-gen wireless transmitters is on the fritz, and we can't get it repaired. Ebay is not an option here, as it is through the school system. Since the first-gen series has been discontinued, only the G2 series is available through our normal contract dealer.

    The Question: Will a G2 beltpack work with a G1 receiver (if both are on the same freq, of course)??? I'm guessing no, but it's worth a shot.

    Thanks!
     
  2. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    It actually appears as if it will work!
    notice bullet five on this page-
    http://tinyurl.com/ydxzzz
     
  3. Schniapereli

    Schniapereli Active Member

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    Couldn't any transmitter work with basically any receiver? Except for low battery notifications, and features like that, aren't they just regular analog radio waves?
    (are the things like battery notifications just side band?)
     
  4. mbenonis

    mbenonis Wireless Guy Administrator Premium Member

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    Yes and no. They will work, but they may not work well. This is because different manufacturers use different signal processing and noise reduction techniques, such pre-emphasis, compansion, and tone-key squelch. If the receiver is not matched to the transmitter, the audio output may sound really bad or might not exist at all (if tone-key squelch is used).

    As to the specific question, I reposted the question to the theatre-sound list-serv but haven't heard back yet. If anyone knows, they will.

    BTW, a tip for testing wireless transmitters. If you have a wideband receiver or an HT (handie-talkie) with a wideband receiver in it, you can simply tune the receiver to the transmitter's frequency and check to see that it is operating correctly. And I've even heard that sound ops have used their radios as mic receivers in a really bad pinch.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2006
  5. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    I have access to G2 and G1 systems at my school...but the school is locked until after the new year, and we want to get a wireless mic order in before then so that I can configure the new systems and set squelch and receiver volume and such before going back go college in mid-January. If I didn't do it, they'd have to pay someone to come in and configure the systems, because no one at my HS currently cares enough about tech to learn all the ins and outs of the equipment, they just want to be able to flick the rack on and use the mics and mixer. That's it. So I have to configure it before returning or wait until spring break.
     
  6. SHARYNF

    SHARYNF Well-Known Member

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    Both are compatible with one another
    Sharyn
     
  7. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Sweeet...
    THANKS! Thank you for that answer.

    That's what I needed to hear. In the past, the HS has only been able to have a max of 8 wireless systems running with the gear that they have. After I order all of the spare parts to make everything work properly and adjust all of the squelch and gain settings, they should have 11! We're going to also order a few extra WL-93's for the Shure wireless.

    OK..another question...does anyone know of a source that custom terminates WL-93's for the Sennheiser screw-on miniplug? Or does Shure do this? If so, where can they be ordered from? (A part # would be great.) We'd like to use the more inexpensive WL-93's instead of ME-4's that we would have to buy as replacements for our two broken mics. The ME-4's cost alot more at over $100 versus the WL-93's at 65 bucks. I know that an WL-93 with custom termination will probably cost more, but it will probably be less than the ME-4 (correct me if I'm wrong).

    EDIT: And one more question...do all of the transmitters and recievers in the G2 range cover the 500's to 700's MHz range, or are there specific ranges of frequencies (I usually don't set the systems to far off from the frequency that they are on when they start up, because we have very little TV or other interference in my hometown, so I haven't run the frequency as far as it will go).
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2006
  8. mbenonis

    mbenonis Wireless Guy Administrator Premium Member

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    The systems are divided into small segments, usually 20-30 MHz wide. The frequency bands should be printed on both the transmitters.

    You will need to coordinate your frequencies if you are using that many wireless systems in the same space. See this post for more details on this topic:

    http://www.controlbooth.com/forums/showpost.php?p=44082&postcount=4
     
  9. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    I've read up on such things here and at the Shure site, and in a few other sources. I know that it's going to be an issue...

    But half of the systems are VHF and half of the systems are UHF. We've got some OLD shure and A-T units that we're using on top of the new sennheisers.
     
  10. mbenonis

    mbenonis Wireless Guy Administrator Premium Member

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    I would still run some calculations on the system. While I highly doubt that your VHF units will interfere with the UHF units, all it takes is two units to cause trouble for each other.

    BTW, you said you can't get it repaired (I missed that part before now). Have you contacted Sennheiser directly? Everyone on the theatre-sound list-serv made a point of saying how easy Sennheiser is to work with for things like this (and in general). I can get you direct contact information if you'd like.
     
  11. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Considering that we have no documentation whatsoever, and the school would much rather just get it over quick and simple than try to work directly with a manufacturer (hey, if I was going to be home for a few months, I'd definitely go for it), I think that we'll just buy a new pack. We have to get a new mic anyway.

    ALSO: Even though the transmitters only cover a narrow band each, the receivers are fully variable over all of the bands that the transmitters come in, correct? Or do I have to get replacement packs of a specific frequency band to go with the receiver? I know that I shouldn't get many packs in the same band, but that's not what I'm talking about. I just want to know if I have to buy a pack with the same frequency range as the original pack.

    Again, I would answer these questions myself by going in and testing, but I can't, because the school's locked up for xmas break.
     
  12. SHARYNF

    SHARYNF Well-Known Member

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    the receivers are banded also, so you would have to get a transmitter of the Same band. I suggest that you do work with Sennheiser, they are easy to work with, and the problem you are going to run into is getting just a transmitter in stock at some dealer. here is a link for documentation
    http://www.sennheiserusa.com/newsite/pdfs/SennWorkWithEvoWrlss2005.pdf

    If you have to get a whole set I suggest getting a new frequency band, then send the broken one back for repair, so you wind up with a second usable system at the same time as your others. WHILE evolution g1 and g2 will work together, you cannot get a receiver from another company in the same band as the compander will be different and it will not work.

    UHF and VHF do not interfere with one another BUT TV channels 14-64 are inthe same bands as the UHF systems and digital is going to be also, so make sure you look at sennhesisers guides state by state

    http://www.sennheiserusa.com/newsite/mat_dev/frequencyfinder/Freqfinder-ew.asp

    Sharyn
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2006
  13. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    I already have a source for purchasing individual transmitters, and now I have the frequency ranges that I need. I actually wrote down the frequencies of the transmitters before I left the high school last week, so I've got all of the information that I need.

    So: If I order a G2 transmitter in the same band as the G1 transmitter it should work with the G1 receiver, correct? I just gotta get all of this flawlessly straight before sending a purchase order to the drama teacher. I just have to make sure that she knows to specify which frequency bands to purchase when she gets replacements. We actually are replacing a G1 transmitter and a G2 transmitter, because one of the G1 transmitters is broken, and someone walked off with our G2 transmitter. (If theory works in our favor, we'll find the old G2 transmitter as soon as we get the new one, so that we'll have a double safety there.) We're also ordering replacement WL-93's and windscreens for our Shure wireless.
     
  14. SHARYNF

    SHARYNF Well-Known Member

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    To set your mind at ease, just give Senneheiser a call. A lot depends on how quick you need something, I think you will find that the indivudual transmitters are typically not stocked and need to be special ordered, but it might vary by who you are dealing with. Typically your source would also be able to guarantee that they will all work together. In my experience they do work together and there were only slight differences in the two units,

    Sharyn
     
  15. mbenonis

    mbenonis Wireless Guy Administrator Premium Member

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    This is true to an extent, but some manufacturers (such as Lectrosonics) make receivers and transmitters capable of working with other brands - so you could use a Sennheiser handheld with a Lectro receiver, and so forth. This is achieved with a DSP chip in the Lectro units that emulates the Sennheiser receiver. This is useful in tough RF spaces, for instance, because Lectrosonics receivers are considered state-of-the-art and can pick a needle out a a haystack that Sennheiser and Shure units couldn't find if they wanted to.

    Definitely take a look at the Sennheiser guide, but also take a look at the FCC's website. The Sennheiser (and other manufacturers') guides are often out of date because new transmitters are springing up all over the place. The FCC database is available at <http://www.fcc.gov/mb/video/tvq.html>, and you should do a search for TV stations within 100km of your coordinates (see the bottom of the search page). Then look at each TV station's coverage map and try to find a channel without any transmitters covering your location. It's time consuming but well worth the effort. From there, find frequencies in those channels that do not intermodulate.
     

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