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Serger?

Discussion in 'Costumes and Makeup' started by derekleffew, Sep 2, 2008.

?

Does your shop have a serger?

  1. Yes.

    72.7%
  2. No.

    13.6%
  3. What's a serger?

    13.6%
  1. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Is a serger beneficial?
     
  2. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    At what point do these things become Question of the Day material?

    And yes, our shop has one, seems pretty useful. After all, its a stitch used on just about every t-shirt.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2008
  3. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    A shop without a serger is like a woodshop without a table saw. Now the Walking Foot Zig-Zag machine I got donated last year is just a perk. :mrgreen:
     
  4. Dally

    Dally Member

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    I wish! I think this is one of the space issues, if you don't have enough room for a sewing machine its hard to decide to put a serger in. But I remember the simpler days of yore serging all my inside seams...now I just leave them ugly and hanging out...who likes that?
     
  5. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    In my brief experience in the costuming world... I made a Hat!... I found that the serger is one of the most useful tools around. It's also extremely useful for prop and scenic departments.

    I'm told that the "Baby Lock" is the best as it's easier to thread than most. It's all I've used so I don't know how hard the others are. Yeah if you don't have a lot of space it's going to be hard to justify but very useful for everyone in your theater.
     
  6. philhaney

    philhaney CBMod CB Mods

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    Last time I checked, we had two. But then I'm only there for part of the year (it's a seasonal gig). Also they were refered to as overlock machines, so I'm not sure if they "serge" as well (which I think just means they cut the excess material off... Am I right?).
     
  7. DaveySimps

    DaveySimps CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    They are a VERY useful tool. Every shop that can afford one should get one.

    ~Dave
     
  8. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    You can have an over-lock stitch that does not cut off the excess, but that would be a very old machine. For those that don't know a serger has, typically anywhere from 3-5 needles, a blade for cutting off excess material prior to it being stitched, and usually a walking foot.
    The needles work in a complex ballet of engineering wonder to create that really cool stitch you see on the inside hem of a t-shirt. One of the nice things is you can take a piece of fabric with a very irregular edge, run it through a serger and you get a piece with a straight edge < provided you ran it though straight> and a nice "over-locked" stitching which will keep the fabric from fraying. The blade is extremely sharp, it's basically a razor that saws up and down as the fabric moves through. The "Walking foot" is a feature typically found on machines that are used for stitching thick fabrics. A Walking Foot is a presser foot that moves forward and backward with the action of the "feed dogs" < feed dogs are the funny looking teeth that move up and down and back and forth to move material into the needle. In a regular machine the presser foot < or pressure foot> ( I prefer presser) just presses down on the material to keep it against the feed dogs, on a walking foot the presser; pushes down to pinch the fabric, moves toward the needle with the dogs, then raises up moves away from the needle, then presses down again to pinch more fabric. This is very helpful when working with thicker fabrics, such as when you might be sewing Drapes let's say. Without a walking foot the top piece of fabric can tend to bunch up causing the two pieces to creep against each other, by the time you get to the end of a 20' hem the pieces might have moved as mush as 2 " in relation to each other, this would be bad.
    There are tons of cool machines in the sewing world I like Blind stitchers, they do the seam down the side of your jeans, which is a lot of work when you think about it. Devoted Ziz-zag machines, like the one I now own for doing draperies, and other gear < the guy I got it from was in the Climbing harness feild, this baby can sew through 4 layers of 1/8" nylon webbing!>
    Caution If you're a TD and you know how to sew, Never let anyone know or they'll always send you to the costume shop to make curtains. While this can be theuraputic, it can result in Stitch and ***** disease.
     
  9. philhaney

    philhaney CBMod CB Mods

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    We had a four-needle machine and a five-needle machine. The only real difference I can remember was that the lady who ran wardrobe at the time said the five-needle overlock was real difficult to thread.
     
  10. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    In college we had to run every piece through the serger before it was stitched together. I believe it was beneficial, the stuff I altered that was not ran through the serger was a real pain to work with compared to the stuff what was.
     
  11. Dally

    Dally Member

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    What blind stiched seam down the side of your jeans? I have NEVER noticed a blind stiched seam there. In my experience we used blind stichers for hems for skirts or jackets and such where we either blind stiched the hem to the garment itself or blind stiched the lining up into the garment.
     
  12. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Your right sorry, It's a double blind or rolled blind stitch down the side of your jeans, which it what this amazing machine did.
     
  13. cdub260

    cdub260 CBMod CB Mods

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    Our costume shop, in fact has several sergers, and if I'm not mistaken, about 98% of our costumes go through a serger before they're assembled.
     

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