Shower Cubicle/Door?

Hey guys,

I am currently working on an original musical and have been drafted in to help with scenery. The opening sees a shower cubicle centre stage (which does not need running water). It later on revolves to reveal a front door on the front, that could be accessible through the back of the shower. It needs to be big enough to fit people in comfortably, and light enough to revolve probably on casters I would imagine. Has anybody got any ideas of how we could achieve this?

If you need any more information post below.
 

chausman

Chase
Fight Leukemia
Well, can it just be a flat with three walls? Like this: |_| (kind of, not having holes) and then the back wall would be showers and the front would be the shower, when you spun it, it had a door. Depending on the sight lines, you may need to make the two walls on the side hinged so they could show everyone in the house, not just the center. Or you could go the more expensive way and put glass walls so they didn't need to be hinges, but that would probably get very heavy.

Oh, another idea, what about building [thread=23526]Van's Revolve Plans[/thread]? Then you just build it on that and spin it around! Then, you could make side walls that just stayed at an angle where it would be seen by everyone, and then when it spins around (According to Van very easily) it could have the back of those side walls be painted to look like siding and a door on the front!

(If that seems hard to understand (a lot of things sound good in my head and don't when I say them) I can draw something like what I was thinking.)
 
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Yeah, that's a very good idea! The only thing I can't see working though is how to get it back off stage?? I don't really want it to be on stage for the entire show if I can help it and seeing as it's quite a main prop for the opening I'll want it at the front. Any ideas?
 

MarshallPope

Well-Known Member
It may be possible to put the piece on a wagon on swivel casters. it could roll into place, either freely or on a track of 1x4's screwed to the deck. Once in place, you could have one wagon break or some other pin in the upstage center that would lock into the stage deck, and it could revolve around that.

If that even makes sense.
 

chausman

Chase
Fight Leukemia
Yeah, that's a very good idea! The only thing I can't see working though is how to get it back off stage?? I don't really want it to be on stage for the entire show if I can help it and seeing as it's quite a main prop for the opening I'll want it at the front. Any ideas?

[-]What about putting the revolve itself on a flat that could be wheeled on and off? [/-] I don't know if that would work, but it might be worth a shot. Won't work well, see below
 
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MarshallPope

Well-Known Member
What about putting the revolve itself on a flat that could be wheeled on and off? I don't know if that would work, but it might be worth a shot.

I foresee two potential problems with that approach that would need to be considered. First, I'm not sure how much you have dealt with wagoned (word?) sets, but you can get into some significant weight pretty quickly. That must be taken into account when planning movements.
Second, with a revolve stacked on top of a wagon, you are looking at the top being at least a foot off the deck, if you allow a rough 6" for each the wagon and the revolve. I'm thinking that this would likely end up being a bit over that, even. You could attempt to build a custom wagon around a revolve, and it may work depending on the size needed, but I'm afraid that you would need to go to metal to get the required strength in the bottom half. Of course, BMI (I think. Either them or Rose Brand) has some low-profile fixed wagon casters that could be used, but they are pricey IIRC.
 

chausman

Chase
Fight Leukemia
I foresee two potential problems with that approach that would need to be considered. First, I'm not sure how much you have dealt with wagoned (word?) sets, but you can get into some significant weight pretty quickly. That must be taken into account when planning movements.
Second, with a revolve stacked on top of a wagon, you are looking at the top being at least a foot off the deck, if you allow a rough 6" for each the wagon and the revolve. I'm thinking that this would likely end up being a bit over that, even. You could attempt to build a custom wagon around a revolve, and it may work depending on the size needed, but I'm afraid that you would need to go to metal to get the required strength in the bottom half. Of course, BMI (I think. Either them or Rose Brand) has some low-profile fixed wagon casters that could be used, but they are pricey IIRC.
Thats what I was thinking after I posted that. Seems like the revolve would make things more complicated that you want.
 

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