Shure v Senny

I honestly haven't seen anyone using Sennheiser 9000 series since they sent demo units around to the major rental shops a few years ago.

At the top end, most of the major players these days are entirely Shure Axient AD4Q and maybe they'll throw a receiver or two of Sennheiser 6000 Series into their kits just to appease whatever random rider asks for it when a major artist just has to use their own handheld they've had custom finished. Once you spec Axient vs 9000 series the price is roughly in the same ballpark.

You get a few nifty features using Axient instead of ULX-D here is the generic run-down:
  • ShowLink - It's like magic when it works
  • Expanded spectrum efficiency when you're running in high-bandwidth mode
  • Tiny packs!
Sennheiser has fallen way behind the curve when it comes to the cutting edge of what a system can do. They have pretty much lost this round to Shure.



There's also a justified reason for their price-points! First, tiny tiny. Second, almost all of those receivers are first a high quality single-channel diversity receiver and secondarily a mono-receive dual-channel receiver. Third, they blast a huge amount of RF that Sennheiser and Shure just don't do - think 100 - 150mW and can just blast away a high noise floor. I think there are times this is useful (Reality TV, where you're in a chase car trying to capture audio of the talent in front of you or a few blocks away) but I also think more often than not the mopic folks really abuse this because they just don't understand RF very well. I routinely run large RF rigs on arena gigs at 1mW transmit, it just takes some planning and diligence to avoid the noise (and usually, Axient...)

If you REALLY want to blow budgets up, go look at Wisycom - their stuff splits the line between Film and Live and is on the bleeding edge of what a wireless system can do. There's really no good analogy - Shure's stuff is also powerful, but their interfaces are clean and polished. Wisycom's stuff isn't as nice to interface with, but the flexibility is even more insane - and it extends beyond their Receivers, their antenna distribution and filtering products are pretty wild.
My issue with the Axient system is the batteries. Why TWO form factors, with the requirement for separate chargers? Also had the battery lock fail on a pack recently. Fortunately it was while loading the battery in, not during use, and we had a spare.
 

themuzicman

Well-Known Member
My issue with the Axient system is the batteries. Why TWO form factors, with the requirement for separate chargers?
Technically 4 types of batteries in the current line-up -
  • AXT910's for ADX1M's,
  • SB910 for ADX1's
  • SB900B's for AD1, AD3 (and ULX/QLX/PSM)
  • SB920's for AD2, ADX2, and ADX2FD

I don't think having different batteries is especially onerous. Axient is a premium product and engineering the product to be what it needs to be and matching a battery to each individual model makes a lot of sense to get the most out of each individual form factor. It's also why the SBRC modular charger exists and build out your charging solutions to fit your needs. At least on the lowest end, if you're upgrading from ULX-D you can re-use batteries.

Also had the battery lock fail on a pack recently. Fortunately it was while loading the battery in, not during use, and we had a spare.
The ADX1M batteries do occasionally not lock properly when loading, every now and again one side doesn't load in quite right and you have it fail. Just like you I've never had it happen in-use, but once you know how to look out for it, it tends to be quickly avoided when powering up.
 

Users who are viewing this thread