Side Light Trees

I'm looking for some opinions.

I'm researching purchasing the Global Truss Quick Grid system to use for side lighting positions. This would replace the traditional weighted bases using threaded schedule 40. I discovered these when I was filling in for a TD at another venue, and it was a good solution for them as a roadhouse that needed to roll these out for the random community event. I borrowed a few for a large ballet production in my venue and learned a few inherent issues that come with them. The coupler clip liked to snag the tutus and needed covered with tape. The base is slightly elevated so it required more marking for visibility and some padding. The grid system limited the flexibility of heights. (Although they do make 2 different sizes if I wanted to get that added flexibility) I found them to be relatively easy to use, and store. Who else has used these and what are your thoughts? I am hesitating before I replace my full system, or decide to purchase just 2 that are needed to fill the needed 5th tree. Thanks for your thoughts.

https://www.idjnow.com/global-truss...n-for-moving-heads-in-black-quad-package.html
 

derekleffew

Resident Curmudgeon
Senior Team
Premium Member
1. Post moved here from another location.
2."They're booms dagnabit, dogs pi$$ on trees!"
3.After @STEVETERRY invented touring sidelight towers, @SteveB had a set made to his specifications. Maybe he'll link to the appropriate post(s). Here's one mention: https://www.controlbooth.com/threads/first-post-and-looking-for-some-help-with-dance-towers.33106 .
4.EDIT: (Actually clicked on the link) OH, those?
1664412690733.png

Floor ladders !? would be the most descriptive term I can think of for those. Consider the amazing structures one can build oneself from Unistrut. @SteveB calls it Kindorf. Same thing, and probably fully compatible.
 
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SteveB

Well-Known Member
We had a local steel manufacturer make us side light towers, of the kind made popular by Productions Arts (Steve Terry) for touring dance companies. Theirs were aluminun, ours were 1"square stock steel. They cost about $4000 for 8 total towers. They were 7ft high, about 18" wide and 30" deep If memory serves. We had them weld in vertical Kindorf channel steel so we could install horizontal Kindorf struts to hang S4's. on. The horizontals were flexible as to height and spacing. Other then being heavy, they were really very useful as the fixtures stayed installed. I'll hunt for some pictures.
 

Ted jones

Well-Known Member
We had a local steel manufacturer make us side light towers, of the kind made popular by Productions Arts (Steve Terry) for touring dance companies. Theirs were aluminun, ours were 1"square stock steel. They cost about $4000 for 8 total towers. They were 7ft high, about 18" wide and 30" deep If memory serves. We had them weld in vertical Kindorf channel steel so we could install horizontal Kindorf struts to hang S4's. on. The horizontals were flexible as to height and spacing. Other then being heavy, they were really very useful as the fixtures stayed installed. I'll hunt for some pictures.
Steve, We've built dance towers for groups here in Chicago over the years. Very similar to your description. They work well.
 

StradivariusBone

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We have these and they're pretty neat. Haven't tried flying them for anything yet, but they are really nice for hanging movers in random spots. You might have difficulty fitting a larger fixture on there, but honestly I would be slightly hesitant to put anything terribly heavy on the top two spots, it does get a little wobbly. I haven't read the manual to know how much they'd recommend loading it, but we've been conservative so far. They fit the typical LED mover form factor well and the gussets on the corners make for good spots to route cables down the sides.

I would definitely agree if using for sidelighting for dance you would want to put tape on the bases. That said, they are very easy to move if you needed to scoot them out of a wing during an itty bitty number or whatnot.

And to help muddy the sea of nomenclature for @derekleffew, our team has taken to calling them "ladders".
 

Footer

Senior Team
Senior Team
Premium Member
We have momix in today, they have what I believe are the old Production Arts towers.
PXL_20221006_135911192.jpg


For what its worth, our booms stay together 365. They live near our load in elevator. I built this cart to move them probably 10 years ago and its still going strong. Just a side arm welded to a 2 wheel cart.

PXL_20221006_004404124.MP.jpg
 

SteveB

Well-Known Member
Thx for the photo Footer. Our towers are basically the same, only a steel square stock variation on the Momix tower, which look to be aluminum and as such are much lighter, but also much more expensive to build. I priced used aluminum towers from 4 Wal, they wanted much more then what we paid for custom steel. We have Kindorf verticals on ours and Kindorf horizontal pieces that the units bolt to, we can get 4 - S4 ellipsoidals and 1 - S4 Par in ours. They stay built with a 6 circuit cable bundle installed.
 

Footer

Senior Team
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Thx for the photo Footer. Our towers are basically the same, only a steel square stock variation on the Momix tower, which look to be aluminum and as such are much lighter, but also much more expensive to build. I priced used aluminum towers from 4 Wal, they wanted much more then what we paid for custom steel. We have Kindorf verticals on ours and Kindorf horizontal pieces that the units bolt to, we can get 4 - S4 ellipsoidals and 1 - S4 Par in ours. They stay built with a 6 circuit cable bundle installed.
Yup, these are aluminum. Dimmer doublers and everything. First dimmer rack I've had onstage in at least 5 years. Only thing I'd add to the momix ones are wheels on the back so they can be tipped and rolled that way.
 

derekleffew

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Clever use of a two-wheel hand truck to move booms; and all it took was welding on a sidearm?

The bottom S/C Lekolite is built wrong, or at least his ass is upside-down. The lens barrel assembly needs to rotate 180° where it meets the gate.

Production Arts towers never had wheels. The towers rode upright on a 3/4" ply castered dolly. Getting towers on and off the dolly was always a challenging undertaking. Were they mine, I'd investigate permanent casters and probably either two cane bolt s or wagon brake s.
 

Footer

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Clever use of a two-wheel hand truck to move booms; and all it took was welding on a sidearm?

The bottom S/C Lekolite is built wrong, or at least his ass is upside-down. The lens barrel assembly needs to rotate 180° where it meets the gate.

Production Arts towers never had wheels. The towers rode upright on a 3/4" ply castered dolly. Getting towers on and off the dolly was always a challenging undertaking. Were they mine, I'd investigate permanent casters and probably either two cane bolt s or wagon brake s.
Ya, these still have those carts too.

Yup, just a side arm welded on cut at the right length. Works great.
 

Darin

Well-Known Member
One advantage to a very low ceiling in my space: I can screw a flange into the deck, screw in my boom, and attach it to the grid above. Super slim profile, no need for weights, solid as a rock
 

SteveB

Well-Known Member
A former co-worker found this at work,
 

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