SOG PowerCut

gafftapegreenia

CBMod
CB Mods
Joined
Sep 24, 2005
Location
Michigan
Has anyone tried out the SOG Powercut? This is a multitool with a combination diag/wire-stripping head instead of pliers. They look rather nice, but of course, I want the CB opinion before I spend.
 
Last edited:

derekleffew

Resident Curmudgeon
Senior Team
Premium Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Location
Las Vegas, NV, USA
As much as I love my Gerber, and with apologies to Alton Brown,
A multi-purpose tool does no one thing well.
Wire strippers that only do 10-14g; rather limiting, no? And that crimper is a poor excuse for a Klein 1005. While I share your tool fetish, (I still have not used my Channellock No. 960), I say pass on this one.
 

gafftapegreenia

CBMod
CB Mods
Joined
Sep 24, 2005
Location
Michigan
Yea Derek, as tempting as it is, I don't think I could spend $100 on a tool that won't strip 16 gauge. My Leatherman Blast is still treating me nicely.

Can someone tell me the advantages of a serrated knife verses a straight edge knife?

So, you watch Good Eats? I love that show because it's science and food, how can you go wrong.
 

derekleffew

Resident Curmudgeon
Senior Team
Premium Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2007
Location
Las Vegas, NV, USA
...Can someone tell me the advantages of a serrated knife verses a straight edge knife?...
See the latest episode of Good Eats, American Slicer.

...So, you watch Good Eats? I love that show because it's science and food, how can you go wrong?
I've "gone wrong" following many of Alton's recipes. I appreciate his knowledge of the hardware, but have tried many of his recipes with disastrous results. The most infamous was my "fudge soup" which never congealed after one hour of boiling!
 

icewolf08

CBMod
CB Mods
Joined
Jan 11, 2007
Location
Lititz, PA
Can someone tell me the advantages of a serrated knife verses a straight edge knife?
Spyderco has a great little page that talks about the advantages of serrated blades in the Edge-u-cation section, here. They also make some of the finest knives IMHO.
So, you watch Good Eats? I love that show because it's science and food, how can you go wrong.
If you like the science behind cooking you might enjoy this cookbook and also this baking book, both by the authors of Cook's Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. They talk about the science behind almost all of the recipes. I find the baking book fascinating. The recipes are easy to follow as well, I have yet to have one go south on me.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

gafftapegreenia

CBMod
CB Mods
Joined
Sep 24, 2005
Location
Michigan
I was just looking at this here Gerber....hmm, might have to try that out, I like the idea of replaceable cutters.

I recently met an ME who swears by Spyderco knives. I have this Gerber, but it needs a sharpening badly, and while I've read up on how to do so, I haven't yet as my folding boxcutter has replaced my standard pocket knife.
 
Last edited:

mixmaster

Active Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2007
Location
Iowa
Yea Derek, as tempting as it is, I don't think I could spend $100 on a tool that won't strip 16 gauge. My Leatherman Blast is still treating me nicely.
Can someone tell me the advantages of a serrated knife verses a straight edge knife?
So, you watch Good Eats? I love that show because it's science and food, how can you go wrong.
I have an 8" and a 10" chef's knife at home in the block. I use both but am developing a preference for the straight blade. I find the edge on the straight is sharper and I can make a much cleaner cut, especially on raw meat. Take a close look at most professional chef's blades, all straight. On the other hand, cooked meats seem to cut easier with all the teeth on a serrated blade.

In the theater, I find a straight blade to be more versitile. I've never been happy trying to strip wires, eat supper, or cut gel with the serrated kind. Serrated blades only seem effective on coarse material like tie line

A well sharpened straight blade will cut smoother and safer. If you think your serrated blade is sharper than a straight blade, it's time to sharpen the straight edge

Good eats is a good show but I wish I could get it earlier in the day here. It's on right at bedtime and I hate going to bed hungry:lol:
 

avkid

Not a New User
Fight Leukemia
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Location
Lakewood, NJ
Last edited:

gafftaper

Senior Team
Senior Team
Fight Leukemia
Joined
Jan 2, 2006
Location
Seattle, WA
Has anyone tried out the SOG Powercut? This is a multitool with a combination diag/wire-stripping head instead of pliers. They look rather nice, but of course, I want the CB opinion before I spend.
Just have to report that I drive past the SOG factory on my way from the theater to pick up the kids at the Grandparent's house. They have an outlet store inside the front doors in that picture. Sometimes there are great deals... this thread has me thinking I may need to make a stop one of these days, I haven't been in a while. My wife's birthday is coming up in a few weeks... maybe she needs a new multi tool?

Also just have to say that I'm a huge fan of A.B. My wife gloats to her friends about the day the "Alton Brown Revolution" came to our house and I went from a hack cook to a gourmet. You have to be careful about the recipes on the food network website, sometimes there are things that are way off from what they say on the show that can destroy a recipe. I like to go to the website at the start of the show, to see if there is a recipe I want, copy it into word, then watch the show and edit the recipe with my own notes. You can not beat A.B.'s brined turkey recipe. It's AWESOME!
 
Last edited:

phil000

Active Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2007
Location
Austin, Tx
A well sharpened straight blade will cut smoother and safer. If you think your serrated blade is sharper than a straight blade, it's time to sharpen the straight edge
As a knife junkie I have to disagree. A serrated blade gives you more surface area, and a lot more jagged areas or points of penetration to get through something quick. I find serrated to be great for stripping back cable and is primarily used for rescue type work as you can obliterate anything fibrous, such as a harness, clothing etc. Also notable is that they are recommended for self-defense...for some reasons stated above ;)

That being said I have:
Plain edge spyderco para military (black on black)
Plain edge Kershaw Cyclone
Plain edge Kershaw leek (black on black)
Fully serrated Spyderco delica 4

A serrated edge is relatively easy to keep sharp with a spyderco sharpmaker.

Greenia, send me a PM and we can talk about sharpening ;)
Phil