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solid backdrop

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by bobgaggle, Mar 21, 2008.

  1. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    For a production of Crazy for You, the design calls for a large backdrop of new york. Its 18' tall by 30' long.

    I have no idea how to do this one. Normally building this wouldn't be a problem, but it has to be moved offstage. I have no decent flyspace and not enough money to afford a fabric backdrop. I'm thinking of using foamboard with a 1x3 frame and hinging the pieces together so it can fold up for storage. keyboard art: /\/\/\/\/. This way they can be straightened out yet compressed for storage backstage. But how do i keep them standing?
     
  2. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    how much wing space do you have ? I might have an Idea built on your "Keyboard Art" < Which was brilliant BTW>
     
  3. Spikesgirl

    Spikesgirl Active Member

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    Does it really need to be solid? Does it need to completely conceal the back wall? Just because it says that they had one in the script doesn't mean you need one for your production. How about cuts out of the buildings (from luan), sort of a tall ground row? We did something like that for the background in "South Pacific". Each piece was about 6' long and about 4' high. We used a hinged support piece, much like a picture frame support to keep them upright.

    Charlie
     
  4. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    Can you build it near the upstage wall and then just open and close a curtain to reveal it?

    Joe
     
  5. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    wing space - we have an irregularly shaped space, but the furthest we can puch anything back is about 14 feet from the edge of the legs.

    It doesn't have to be solid, but i can't see another way to do it.

    Can't hide it with a curtain, cause later in the show we need a desert backdrop. Because this is the last backdrop change, it can be there permanently. New York will hide it.

    And as for 6'x4', my director wants it big, one of them will have a practical door to be used as the "stage door" for the Zangler Theatre.
     
  6. Spikesgirl

    Spikesgirl Active Member

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    Um, not to rain on your director's parade, but when you open the door, won't the desert backdrop be visible and/or in the way? Do you have a sacrifice backdrop that you can paint over and then rig as an olio? You wouldn't need fly space for that.

    The only way I could think to 'flatten out' your accordian shape would be support pieces that would flip down and up, then have braces to lean it back against(again, like a picture frame). That won't really support a door unit though. Even with a foam core construction, you'll have to have a freestanding door in able to make it solid enough to actually be used as a door. In any event, it's going to be awkward to move it quickly and quietly, unless you have Intermission for the change. How long is your run?

    Charlie

    P.S. Have you spoken with your director about your concerns?
     
  7. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    3 day, 5 show run. I can use your idea for the flip down bracing. Might have to tweak it a bit for the door, but i think it'll work. Thanks
     
  8. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Does it have to be flat? Using your wonderful art, /\/\/\/\/, could it not sit like that onstage and then fold together ||||| for offstage storage? Each plane a different building? That could be quite nice. Shape the top of each, Chrysler Bldg, Empire State, etc. Maybe build it in at least three pieces, with the "stage door" for the Zangler Theatre, as a separate unit. Forced perspective could work to your advantage here.
     
  9. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    i like it...have to run it past the boss, but that would work too.
     
  10. superdoo

    superdoo Member

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    I think derek's got it here. That is an awesome idea and so easy too!
     
  11. Spikesgirl

    Spikesgirl Active Member

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    It sounds like the best way to handle it.

    Charlie
     
  12. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    If you wanted the piece to sit flat on stage you could still hinge the panels together and then on the back side of the panels attach braces that can hinge in so that you can still fold and store. The biggest trick with this is devising a way to attach the braces to the deck when the piece is onstage. I would suggest loose pin hinges, with half on the floor and half on the brace so you just put the piece in place, toss a pin in the hinge, and it stands, then when you need it to go away, pull the pins, fold and away it goes.
     

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