spandex or alternative

legacy

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I read in a trade Mag (can't remember which) that there was a cloth that had been used that acts like Spandx but is a lot cheaper. Any one here know what its called or where I can find it? thanks Lee
 

sound_nerd

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Sorry....I'm not sure. I want to mention though, that there's no need to post the same thing in multiple forums here. :)
Most people read everything that's newly posted, and cross posting like that just makes things messy when it comes to having all responses on one topic in one place.

-B
 

Van

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I read in a trade Mag (can't remember which) that there was a cloth that had been used that acts like Spandx but is a lot cheaper. Any one here know what its called or where I can find it? thanks Lee

It's Tricot < tree - co > Swimsuit liner, soft sliky smoothacts like a scrim is very stretchy and I use it all the time on-stage. You can get it from almost any sewing supply store, comes in White, Biege, black and nude. several different deniers < weight > Lighter the weight the more transparent it looks when used as scrim.
It also drapes beautifully and makes a gorgeous backdrop for vocal and presentational work.
 

TechiGoz

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Thanks Van, it was on the tip of my tongue but I couldn't remember what it was called.

I have used it for a variety of things, as Van stated, in backdrops for vocals, instrumental items, confrences, even a cyc at one stage. It is versatile and cheap. I usually use one of the heavier white tricot's, but have used the lighter ones for scrims on many occassions.
 

DarSax

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Actually, thank you guys from me as well, I think I might have a use for tricot myself....
 

gafftaper

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Check out Pink Inc's website and let you imagination consider the posibilities...
http://www.pinkincdesign.com/ They are pricey but they do rent out their products. I'm not sure exactly what fabrics they use, but you can do similar things with tricot.


Also you will be amazed at what you can do on the cheap with just plain $2 a yard cheese cloth. It doesn't have the cool streetchy effects, but it looks good on a High School budget.
 

DarSax

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Ooh, that was the other thing that was mentioned here. Where do you get "cheese cloth?" Just in a fabric store?
 

gafftaper

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I get my cheese by the yard at my local theater supply store, it's also at the local fabric super store. I'm sure the big fabric and drape houses sell it and you can probably special order it at your local fabric store.
 

Van

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Ooh, that was the other thing that was mentioned here. Where do you get "cheese cloth?" Just in a fabric store?
Most paint stores carry cheese cloth as well usually in bulk by the foot. I've found the cheese cloth sold in bulk by our local paint supplier, Miller Paint, is an excellent cloth for reinforcing foam, dutchman-ing and the like. It's also incredible cheap. Rose Brand sells a variety of "scenic Gauzes" Scenic guaze, and cheese cloth have completely different properties than that of tricot though.
 
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dvlasak

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One thing that you need to take into consideration when you use cloth of any kind on a stage, convention center, etc. is if it has been treated for flame resistance. Anything that you put on stage MUST be treated!! You may think that it is not necessary, but all it takes is one mistake. Perhaps someone flies out the wrong batten and the material comes in contact with hot lamps, hot fog/bubble/snow machine, or what have you, and now you have yourself a real problem!!


Dennis
 

Van

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One thing that you need to take into consideration when you use cloth of any kind on a stage, convention center, etc. is if it has been treated for flame resistance. Anything that you put on stage MUST be treated!! You may think that it is not necessary, but all it takes is one mistake. Perhaps someone flies out the wrong batten and the material comes in contact with hot lamps, hot fog/bubble/snow machine, or what have you, and now you have yourself a real problem!!


Dennis

Before you go rushing out to Flamex all your soft-goods, Remember some fabrics are referred to as IFR < Inherently Flame Retardent> and do not require additional flame retardent treatment. In some cases adding an after market flame retardent may actually ruin the existing qualities, and can definately have adverse effects on the material itself. Often you can get a certificate, similar to an MSDS from the manufacturer of a fabric attesting to it's retardedness. < anti-flameness ? >
Be sure to check with your local Fire Marshal before treating stuff on your own, and you can save your self a lot of headache. The "flame Test" that materials are subjected to can vary greatly from city to city. Just ask anyone who has spent time on the road. Be sure to check, then double check your measurements when mixing flame retardents and use only the appropriate amount or you will wind up with stained/ discolored materials.

ALWAYS test in an inconspicuous area before subject all of a piece to flame retarding materials.
One last thing. Remeber that not only do soft-goods need to be treated, but hard surfaces as well sometimes. Almost anytime a flame effect is used on stage the entire area that may be exposed the flame need to be treated as well as the curtains and possibly the costumes depending on what the effect is.