Specific 360Q Rebuild Questions (have done due diligence on searching these awesome threads)

DELO72

Well-Known Member
Everything is fine or easy enough to correct.


If crispy on on side, the same on the other be it lamp or stage pin plug. I'm sure you read about the "Virus one causes in putting a perfectly good lamp into a bad socket, or a bad lamp into a good socket." concept in your reading.

What TP-22 socket you bought is probably fine, just different brand or type than I would normally purchase. What seems like rubber is probably silicone. There are many types of TP-22 sockets on the market using SF-2 and other types of wire rated for 200c.
SF- Silicone 200°C. Fixture wire.
SF-1or 2- Silicone Rubber NMT, 392°F. “-1" is 18 Awg. 300v. “-2" is 16-18 Awg. 600v. Solid or seven stranded. Fixture wire. SF-2 is the normal wire to purchase, though a 575w fixture only requires the lower wattage. An Altman 360Q is rated for 750 Watts, so SF-2 wiring or below Teflon in 16ga wire is required.
16ga Type E, Teflon 200°C. is the other version of heat wire normally in use. It's a little thinner and normally will have fiberglass insulation added over it.

Normally the soft Silicone SF-2 insulation is is factory wrapped tight with fiberglass insulation, at other times, possibly in the case of Silicone or Teflon a Size #12 thicker fiberglass sleeving is pushed over the conductor and heat shrunk into place for added protection. There are a lot of TP-22 lamp sockets on the market, though less than there used to be. All depends on the brand and era, they are all rated for the fixture. I tend towards the ones with the added fiberglass sleeving or add it to my fixtures if not, but that's just a added safety thing.

Your 3/8 "Insultherm" sleeving should be black, 5/16" or #0 sized fiberglass sleeving. (Never heard of Insultherm sleeving before). So that's probably not going to fit too well into the Heyco strain relief used on a 360Q Leko if 3/8" described. I have seen a lot of 3/8" sleeving in use, could be forced... but best not to use.

Did you purchase the Heyco strain reliefs with the same part number printed on the ones removed, which normally are re-usable? I looked at my bin and it's 6P-4, though there might be in use other part numbers with similar numbers, just more letters added.

Did you purchase the Heyco strain relief pliers or are you using channel Loc's and or conduit pliers to insert? You don't have to use the strain relief pliers, and at times they need an extra effort to get in. Sometimes once you get the cord strain relief seated, it takes wrapping it's top in conduit pliers or ChannelLoc's, than pounding the pliers ends with a hammer to seat the strain relief. You can also pre-train the wire to the bending a Heyco will do to high temp (not as flexible wire.)

"Threads on this multiple times mentioned that 200-250C rated fiberglass sleeve or techflex was just fine for whips. Do we need to re-order 650C sleeve? Also, what size? Is 1/4 just fine? We're not planning to run DMX through these whips too. Every 360Q is lamped at 575w."

Not sure where you got this info, but 250c rated wire is often less flexible and more made for perminant installs. I use it at times for higher wattage fixtures or to simulate asbestos on antique museum pieces. Not to be used for a 360Q fixture whip. "TechFlex", I have never heard of it before as a term. Rockbestos and Tempflex I know of, and neither of which I would use on a 360Q. I use such high teperature wire on Studio Fresnes and other high wattage gear. Datta cable can if shielded can be run in the same fixture whip but in your case and or in the case of high temperature wiring, should not be used in the same whip anyway.

Probably mentioned in readng already, but refresher course anyway as longas on the subject. The 12ga ferrules that come with stage pin plugs are very important to use. But a 12ga ferrule that comes with the plug won't fit well with a 16ga wire. The wire is too thin to center itself inside the ferrule with that screw from the plug coming down on it. And that furrle is too thin in materal to without sufficient wire gauge prevent the screw from cutting thru it and defeating it's purpose.
Standards for where I work I set up in doing Stage Pin are as follows:
Strip 1.1/2" off the cable jacket, or cut the conductors out of the fiberglass sleeving to that length. 1.1/2" is a 2x4 in width for imagined width.
Cut 1/4" off the ground and neutral conductors. Than cut a further 1/4" off the ground. Fork out the conductors as they would fit in the plug in tips even. Strip off 5/16" to better yet 3/8" from each conductor, install the #16 insulated ferrle on it, and the #12 furrle over that. You could also insert a #14 furrle between the two, but for cost effectiveness, the combination of a #16 insulated furrle, inside the #12 that comes with the plug, is normally sufficient to ensure that the 8-32x1/4" brass coated screw will press down on the conductors without just cutting into their strands when tight.
Another Option is to strip almost double the strip length of the 16 ga. wire. Fold it in half and iinsert it into the 12ga. ferrule provided by the maker of the stage pin plug.
A note in terminating your fixture connection to it's plug amongst notes I could dictate all night on.
Hope it helps.

>>AWM 1E59 600V 250 (deg) C" Stranded.>>

Actually, that's 1659 (UL) wire , which has a slightly better temp. rating (250C) than UL SF1 or SF2 (200C). 16AWG is perfect for 750W fixtures. ETC went the extra distance for UL rating and most of their sockets use UL 5359 wire, which is rated for 450C. Oddly enough, we don't make any TP20 sockets with that same wire. I'm not sure why. Likely was never requested.
 

JMBrowne

Member
>>AWM 1E59 600V 250 (deg) C" Stranded.>>

Actually, that's 1659 (UL) wire , which has a slightly better temp. rating (250C) than UL SF1 or SF2 (200C). 16AWG is perfect for 750W fixtures. ETC went the extra distance for UL rating and most of their sockets use UL 5359 wire, which is rated for 450C. Oddly enough, we don't make any TP20 sockets with that same wire. I'm not sure why. Likely was never requested.
Interesting.. So that IS NOT 1E59 I read printed on the cable? Because after having no luck searching that term I thought maybe it was 1659 which brought me to high temp wire out of Canada and after registering with UL's system, I got this for the E code printed on it....
 

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ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Looks really well done but shows nothing other than the forkng of the conductors and fiberglass sleeving well inside the plug. Normally I do insulated ferrules for the 16ga wire, that's a stop for the 12ga ferrule and a seen thing in not putting the wires into the termilal w/o any ferrule or doing something else in double length and cutting half to fold back the rest to fit the 12ga ferrule. Juse an easy thing for me in seeing the insulated 16ga black ferrules.

I assume flat on flat for strain relief, but careful not to over tension? There are two other techniques for doing the strain relief which could long term work better. In further conversation.


Need of any more proper stripper is not needed or what is known by your current stripping tool. I have years of hand drafting classes and bolt sorting etc. so I can by way of literally hundreds or thousands of plugs stripped to their proper length... I can see what one of assistants are doing for it. It should be a practice thing - your noting the neutral was stripped a bit long means you can save money on some tool and just with experience using a ruler or your eye, and at some point develop a habit for what is the proper strip length.
A tool cool to do something easy enough for you to do, but not needed by you is your challenge in loosing that open budget/trust at some point in having the cool thing, and wanting something later but under scrutiny for getting it.. I don't own such a tool, I teach proper strip length. Recommended not to buy such a tool. Train yourself to proper strip length as all people I have trained have done.
 

DELO72

Well-Known Member
Interesting.. So that IS NOT 1E59 I read printed on the cable? Because after having no luck searching that term I thought maybe it was 1659 which brought me to high temp wire out of Canada and after registering with UL's system, I got this for the E code printed on it....
Yup. UL 1659 out of Harbour Industries in Canada. That spec. looks correct.
 

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