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Stage Floor

Joined
Feb 14, 2017
Location
Montague NJ
)o my high school has decided to install a new stage floor (the one we have might be the original from about 1970) and I've been tasked with doing the research. We're not sure if the current system is even particularly safe to work on. Does anyone have any suggestions as to where to start? Thanks in advance!!
 

BillConnerFASTC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Location
Clayton NY 13624
Lots of issues and a search here will show it's a common topic and problem. What Jon asked first, but also is there an orchestra pit, traps, and does stage flooring go wall to wall or transition to concrete in the wings? One fundamental - what is thickness of stage floor on top of slab, presuming it is on a slab.
 
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RickR

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2009
Location
Spokane, WA the great "Inland Northwest"
Somehow I didn't see Bill's post till I did my own.

2nd get any existing drawings from whoever runs the building projects. Big districts have staff architects leading departments. Small ones might use the head of maintenance.

3rd talk to someone that really knows construction and reading those plans. That should get you the answers to Jon & Bill's questions and maybe raise more.

4th document (take pictures) of anything in the theater that might show more than the surface; edges of floor pockets, transitions between flooring types, apron edge, even deep scratches...

5th get clear statements from the 'powers that be' of future plans. More shows, different shows, nontheater groups?

Then you'll understand the issues and the adults will/should listen.

Of course ask questions here as you go along. We have teachers, builders, and many others besides stage technicians.
 

JonCarter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2011
Location
Meridian, Idaho, US
Safety is of course an important issue, and raising the safety issue to help prove the need for replacement is one more "nail in the coffin." Again: Why do you think it is unsafe to work on?
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2017
Location
Montague NJ
What is the structure and surface of your present floor? Why do you think it is unsafe to work on?
The current floor is tongue and groove boards that have been sanded repeatedly and painted black. Before my arrival, some set designers were toe-nailing sets into the floor. Once I took over, we sanded everything down, patched the gouges and painted it black from the natural wood color it had been. I'm not sure about what the structure is below the surface, since there is no way to access below the stage. But I do know the floor is OLD, and it seems to almost feel weak (it almost seems to dip from the weight) in spots when you walk on it.
 

BillConnerFASTC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Location
Clayton NY 13624
So probably stripwood considerably thinner than when installed on sleepers, probably on a slab, but I'm working on a renovation where the sleepers were on dirt. You do need to find out whats under this but I suspect you need to remove and replace. To overlay on existing to fix deflection between sleepers it would have to so thick that it would raise the floor and screw up transitions.

So determine thickness - cut up a section or just a hole saw - and then design a new flooring system. The thinnest I've done is 1x4 sleepers on 12" centers and 3/4" plyron.
 
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