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Stock Gel Selection?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by forbiddenpluto, Apr 5, 2008.

  1. forbiddenpluto

    forbiddenpluto Member

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    Okay, so I hunted through the archives and didn't find exactly what I needed. Totally set when I need to gel the spot though. ;)

    I've been given $ (probably the last for a while) to begin a stock set of gel and gobos. Now, with that being said I'm basically a complete newb when it comes to lighting. I'm an actor/director turned high school TD (aka. I'm in charge of all things technical and the previous director was even more clueless than I).

    Soo... what should I get. Aside from R339 and R60 I'm clueless. I want to use up the $ before they can take it away from me.

    Oh and while we're on the topic of me being clueless when it comes to lighting... anyone have any book recommendations? It's most definitely my summer project.
     
  2. Sean

    Sean Active Member

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    Location:
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    Can you tell us a bit about your venue?

    I'd stock up on cyc colors (do you use the same cyc color all the time, or do you actually color per production?). I say this because if you a bunch of cyc fixtures, chances are they use larger cuts.

    I'd buy some frost if you don't have some. Either R132 or R119, depending on the type of fixtures you have.

    Maybe some amber? R02, R09, etc. Again, without know more about your space and how you use it.....

    --Sean
     
  3. zac850

    zac850 Well-Known Member

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    Do you do drama, dance, musicals, opera, rock and roll, classical concerts..........

    R02, R54, R80, R60, R33, R21 is nice, though maybe a little specific, R3202, R26......

    If you don't have a swatch book, email Rosco, Gam, and Lee, give them your address and ask them to send you a swatch book and perhaps some material. Rosco publishes a little 10 page magazine-type thing that explains how to use their color to light a show. They should send it to you free-of-charge. Look through the swatch books, read the suggestions, and order colors that you like. Every designer has their own set of colors that they like to use. While there is some overlap, a design is art, and artists don't all paint with the same paint brushes.
     
  4. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    R51, R56, R305, R360, L202, L119, L366, R59, R370, L029, R333, R68, R80, R94, R119, R18, R99, I could keep going.. Definitely get the lavs, and the blues, and the ambers, at least one of each. If you are buying with no design in mind, go with something a bit less saturated, that will give basic washes some depth without being too muddy. Having to L119 or R59 laying around though can really help.
     
  5. forbiddenpluto

    forbiddenpluto Member

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    Show wise we deal with musicals (Godspell next year, but I haven't decided on the pallette yet), dance shows (they like being extreme), plays, choral concerts, and presentations. They've booked us a few pro shows, but I haven't gotten their riders yet.

    We're a small theatre. I'm actually working on getting us some new cyc lights as well. We currently have single cell and not enough room for them.

    Instrument wise we've got 30 degree Shakespears and Altman par-cans (which seem to burn through gels ridiculously fast). We also have 4 Mac 550's. I've got an order in for some different sized Source4's and I-cues.

    Right now I've got a Rosco swatchbook and I believe a Lee. I'm starting to get better at this, but I still suck when knowing what it'll actually look like. I'm guessing that comes with time? If it comes from study what book do I need?
     
  6. Sean

    Sean Active Member

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    Well... honestly, it sounds like you need experience. You can read books all you want, but this really is one of those "trial and error" situations.

    Lighting and the Design Idea by Linda Essig. http://www.amazon.com/dp/0155020692/?tag=controlbooth-20 That would be a good place to start.

    Also, Richard Pilbrow's book on being a designer Stage Lighting Design: The Art, the Craft, the Life is a great read....lots of stories, etc. http://www.amazon.com/dp/0896762351/?tag=controlbooth-20

    A Practical Guide to Stage Lighting by Steve Shelley is good.
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/0240803531/?tag=controlbooth-20

    If you don't mind my asking, how did you get hired for this job?

    --Sean
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2014
  7. Lightingguy32

    Lightingguy32 Active Member

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    Some basic colors to look at:
    Warm cross light: R-02, R-16, R-01, R-33, R-34, R-35
    Cool cross light: R-60, R-360
    Neutral- R-52, R-51

    Diffusions:
    R-119
    R-132

    3 Color for Boarder lights
    R-26
    R-83
    R-91
     
  8. lieperjp

    lieperjp Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2014
  9. forbiddenpluto

    forbiddenpluto Member

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    Well, it's high school theatre... I think that explains alot of it right there.

    Beyond that... They needed a theatre teacher... I needed a job. I got said job. After getting said job they then informed me that I'd be taking over all technical aspects of the theatre. I warned them that my training was primarily in acting/directing/SM. Aside from that I only really did some set designing and props. They said that they were sure I could live up to the position and to get studying. So... I did.

    At this point I've actually accomplished quite alot... however, there's much more to learn. On my to do list is to learn how to use all of my lighting equipment to the best of it's capabilities and to build things that do not collapse. ;) Okay, I'm exaggerating at that last one, nothing's ever collapsed on me, but like I mentioned before.... I was a designer, not a builder. Structurally sound was not something I worried about.

    I've gotten 1 full musical (that I was directing as well), 2 large dance shows (complete with multiple set props), 1 pageant, 1 talent show, 1 karaoke night, and numerous assemblies out with only minor drama. I say actor girl has done good for her first year thrown into the flames. I've also had to start the reorganization of the theatre from ground up as the last director knew even less than I did.

    I mentioned in the first post that I was a HS director... so I don't really know where the big suprise that I'm not 100% trained as a technician lies. As many threads on this board will agree, most HS directors don't know so much about the technical side of the theatre. However, unlike them, I am only in this boat for a short amount of time. I know that I'm lacking and I am fixing it. The other TD in the county (amazingly trained, there's proshows there weekly) offered his help at the beginning of the school year. I believe he's regretting it now as I have asked quite frequently. If you don't ask you'll never learn and you'll keep making the same stupid mistakes. I refuse to make a stupid mistake twice.
     
    Charc likes this.
  10. pacman

    pacman Active Member

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    I work with new high school teachers all the time. Usually, they are English teachers who get "stuck" teaching drama because no one else is willing to put in the many extra hours. Most stumble through their first year. The second year gets easier & better, & so on. There are those who find it's not their "calling" & move on.

    Hang in there & keep asking questions. If you stick with it, I bet you'll find it's one of the most rewarding experiences you'll ever have.
     
  11. Lightingguy32

    Lightingguy32 Active Member

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    If you are a high school theater, spend some time and sit down to look at your plot. Get an idea of how many fixtures you have that are vital for area lights and what doesn't need to be gelled. Come up with a list of frame sizes and the number of color cuts of each color you want to have and then buy gel sheets and rolls accordingly (first get a quote). If you can't afford all of the colors of gel you want, cut out what is either for special effects lighting or does not necessarily need to be gelled to keep things looking good. What really should concern you is the primary cross light washes of R-33 or R-02 paired with R-60/R-52 (depends on what you need and your color preferences)
     

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