Student instructed to light a match on stage, cardboard set caught fire

JChenault

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Joined
Jan 5, 2009
Location
seattle, wa USA
"If the bit involves *purposeful* danger (everything on a stage *can* be dangerous), then you only do anything related to it if there is an Insured Paid Professional on the stage with the effect at all time. Artistic chain of command is not permitted to violate this rule."

[ 'Purposeful' danger involves any weapons, simulated or otherwise, fire/pyro, any rigging/flying including simulated hanging, and any kind of fighting. ]
While I agree with the sentiment, having an insured paid professional in the house is not the standard practice in my experience.

When we hired ZFX to fly a performer, the ZFX employee trained our folks and was not there for the performances.
 

seanandkate

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Fight Leukemia
Joined
Aug 29, 2008
Location
Stouffville, Ontario
While I agree with the sentiment, having an insured paid professional in the house is not the standard practice in my experience.
Ditto with any fight I have seen. The fight director will train, choreograph, assign a fight captain, and move on. Certainly not there for performances.
 

Les

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2004
Location
DFW, Tx.
While I agree with the sentiment, having an insured paid professional in the house is not the standard practice in my experience.

When we hired ZFX to fly a performer, the ZFX employee trained our folks and was not there for the performances.
Certainly true with flying - I've worked with Foy on a few occasions, and they were present 100% of the time on one production, and only for training on the other. The determining factor being what package was purchased.

Now with pyro, the story is a little different. In many states, it's the law to have an NFPA licensed professional present. Merely the presence/approval of the AHJ/Fire Marshal won't cut it in my state (but their approval, at minimum, is always a prerequisite). Very rural areas may differ.
 

gafftaper

Senior Team
Senior Team
Fight Leukemia
Joined
Jan 2, 2006
Location
Seattle, WA
I am seriously thinking about showing this to my tech students, when we have fire safety talk.
Every year I do a 10 hour training intensive for new tech kids and a 1 1/2 refresher with the returning kids. We do a quick refresher on safe fly system operation and I "recertify them" as approved to operate it for another year. Then I give them a pep talk about safety and tell stories and show videos about stupid things people have done in the last year. This will definitely be in the presentation next week.
 
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Jay Ashworth

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Joined
Feb 7, 2014
Location
St Pete FL USA
Sure, I was overstating it.

Or maybe not, given what we're talking about.

Certainly, at the very least, it's the domain of the paid professional to determine whether you're ready to solo. :)
 

BillConnerFASTC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Location
Clayton NY 13624
Certainly true with flying - I've worked with Foy on a few occasions, and they were present 100% of the time on one production, and only for training on the other. The determining factor being what package was purchased.

Now with pyro, the story is a little different. In many states, it's the law to have an NFPA licensed professional present. Merely the presence/approval of the AHJ/Fire Marshal won't cut it in my state (but their approval, at minimum, is always a prerequisite). Very rural areas may differ.
Just a s point of clarification, I am pretty certain NFPA does not "license" to anyone fro anything. Its not in their scope of services. I believe that licensing for pyrotechnics - sales, transportation, operation, etc. - is regulated by the state or other governmental jurisdictions. The requirements or test may require knowledge of NFPA documents, but they don't administer test or certify individuals.
 

Les

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2004
Location
DFW, Tx.
Just a s point of clarification, I am pretty certain NFPA does not "license" to anyone fro anything. Its not in their scope of services. I believe that licensing for pyrotechnics - sales, transportation, operation, etc. - is regulated by the state or other governmental jurisdictions. The requirements or test may require knowledge of NFPA documents, but they don't administer test or certify individuals.
You are correct. The licenses themselves were granted by the State Fire Marshal. I should have been more clear.

Thanks!