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The weird old stuff you find on eBay...

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by gafftapegreenia, May 22, 2007.

  1. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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  2. Thomas

    Thomas Member

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    Looks like a collection of lamp shades to me. Would be an interesting top if we posted pictures of our oldest fixture/device... I'll take a look around my office- must be something disturbing there somewhere! :)
     
  3. drawstuf99

    drawstuf99 Active Member

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    They almost look some of those really funky footlights, but they're a mystery to me.

    Maybe by "theatre built in the thirties" he means "these instruments were taken from the lobby." Ha.

    Interesting
     
  4. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    I'm also thinking architectural fixtures.

    The lamp orientation is wrong for footlights.
     
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Definately an Architectual. Notice they say," fit on an octagonal box".
    That's the old school 4x4 box. What scares me is someone might actually buy them and try to use them.....
     
  6. PadawanGeek

    PadawanGeek Active Member

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    Lol, it reminds me of this really old followspot that the youth ministry at my church somehow scavenged from some school before I came along. It is held together by some really old gaff tape and some duct tape. I've been trying to get rid of it, by the only way that I can think of is getting a new one, but those cost like $300, and we don't have room in our budget for that right now. :(
     
  7. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    Why not try to fix it, Epoxy instead of gaff tape maybe?
     
  8. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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  9. Pie4Weebl

    Pie4Weebl Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I like how the lights in the first one are "authentic"
     
  10. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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  11. lighttechie5948

    lighttechie5948 Active Member

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    Sadly I have been in a facility that would die for those lights. (and the funny part is they bossted having a "state of the art system" ha ha ha, their best peice of equitment was their light board, it was a NSI convensinal board with 48 Dimmers, their secound best feature was their dimmer system
    (but it was "built" in th 50's))
     
  12. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Missed the post but over the weekend I was at a few antique stores and on the shelf to one was a "old stage light" for $15.00.

    Gee, Asbestos whip and all on it.

    Turns out it was a 1920's era 4.1/2" box spot and as opposed to the other 11 that I'm working on getting from a small local theater, this one was designed for stand mount. No yoke, just a side mounting bolt. $15.00 for a fairly rare find, you never know what you will find in an antiques or junk dealer.

    Remember a few years back, there was this place in Lombard IL. called "Kohlar's Trading Post." Don't know if they are still in business but I bought a lot of misc. track lighting from them and converted it for use on stage. At one point they had an Altman 1000 in stock and for sale for like $100.00. Granted it had a cracked lens and something funkey going on inside given I have never seen a 20A twist pin Male/Female connection inside a lighting fixture before, but this one had one. Still for $100.00 plus some re-wiring and parts, I could have had a somewhat decent follow spot.

    As opposed to E-Bay where often those selling the stuff might have an idea of what they are attempting to sell, and what it's going rate is, you might try your local junk yards/salvage comanies and or antique shops where they have no idea of what it is at times they have. This given of course the condition of my box spot was worth about the $15.00 condition. In this case it was missing a reflector - that's not always a bad thing, there are versions that did not use them.
     
  13. drawstuf99

    drawstuf99 Active Member

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    My neighbor, TV News producer, gave me an old Strand/Century leko that was in an old studio of his. Complete w/ asbestos tail & a really funky lamp...yeah.

    Funny thing is, I've seen these things looking like this in several theatres in my area. Oh well, if it works it works. I haven't tried re-wiring it and getting a new lamp to see how it works, though. It's in good condition actually. Pretty cool
     
  14. Pie4Weebl

    Pie4Weebl Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    could someone post a pic of an asbestos tail, I think I know what to look for but I am not positive, and it seems like something worth knowing.
     
  15. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/EHSRM/ASB/ACMPHOTOS/theatrical_lamps1.jpg

    its usually not tied together, usually there are 2 or 3 (grounded or ungrounded) wires, they look like they are covered in crappy white fabric. If you do ever work around it, don't touch the wiring and wash your hands right after. If you have to handle it, the safest way to handle it is to wet it down with a spraybottle and wait for it to dry before you fire the fixture back up. Asbestos must be handled and disposed of correctly with accordance to federal law. There are company's out there that will build a "safe room" and remove all your asbestos from your fixtures and clean them, then you have to put new whips on them. It's not cheap, but if they are doing an asbestos removal in your building anyway, they can do this too.
     
  16. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Yeah, 'cause if you work with it wet, you're much more likely to die of electrocution than misothelioma

    < lung cancer associated with Asbestos inhalation exposure>
     
  17. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Words of wisdom from Van. This one is goin' in the advice database: "Working with wet fixtures may be may hazardous than Asbestos.
     

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