Theoretically...

magickc

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If you had a spare 4 channel mixer and 4 headsets that had seperate input/output lines could you wire all the mic's from the headsets into the mixer then put a 4-way splitter on the output to the mixer and put that into the input to the headsets to create an intercom/cans system?
Rob

Yeh sorry about that...double post..:S
 

avkid

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If you had a spare 4 channel mixer and 4 headsets that had seperate input/output lines could you wire all the mic's from the headsets into the mixer then put a 4-way splitter on the output to the mixer and put that into the input to the headsets to create an intercom/cans system?
Rob
Yeh sorry about that...double post..:S
If I understand you correctly, yes.
But you can't page and all the mics would be live.
 

erosing

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if you have that much spare cable laying around that's actually a pretty cheap solution (read:free or mostly). and as was said, just wire in a few on off switches
 

mbenonis

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Yes, in theory it would work. However, the line output of the mixer is not designed to be loaded by four line input devices, let alone speakers. You'd need a headphone amp type device, and by that point you may as well buy an inexpensive intercom power supply and a few beltpacks. Or just get radio's (NOT GMRS/FRS, needs to be either MURS or licensed UHF business two-way; see my previous thread on the legalities of radio's for theatre use).
 
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avkid

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Mike's right, the answer here is used Motorola business radios with earpieces.
 

Andy_Leviss

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Actually, while I used to say that about FRS, I've done more recent research, and it IS legal to use them commercially, just with the same restrictions as on family use, and no special privelege. IE, if somebody else starts using the same channel, you have to either suck it up or move; you can't say, "We're using this for business, find another channel," or anything else to try to get the newcomers to move. It's an open band, and must be kept as such.

See, among other sources you can find via Google, http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=service_home&id=family
 

avkid

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Actually, while I used to say that about FRS, I've done more recent research, and it IS legal to use them commercially, just with the same restrictions as on family use, and no special privelege. IE, if somebody else starts using the same channel, you have to either suck it up or move; you can't say, "We're using this for business, find another channel," or anything else to try to get the newcomers to move. It's an open band, and must be kept as such.
Cool, i'm not going to jail!!
(this time;))
 

mbenonis

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Actually, while I used to say that about FRS, I've done more recent research, and it IS legal to use them commercially, just with the same restrictions as on family use, and no special privelege. IE, if somebody else starts using the same channel, you have to either suck it up or move; you can't say, "We're using this for business, find another channel," or anything else to try to get the newcomers to move. It's an open band, and must be kept as such.
See, among other sources you can find via Google, http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=service_home&id=family
Well, I stand corrected. I will point out that one must be careful when using dual FRS/GMRS radio's, through, to make sure one uses ONLY the FRS channels and not the GMRS channels (to use these channels one must have a license). Additionally, range and reliability will probably suffer due to the technical limitations of the FRS. That said, if it works for you, it works for you, end of story. :)
 

avkid

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Well, I stand corrected. I will point out that one must be careful when using dual FRS/GMRS radio's, through, to make sure one uses ONLY the FRS channels and not the GMRS channels (to use these channels one must have a license). Additionally, range and reliability will probably suffer due to the technical limitations of the FRS. That said, if it works for you, it works for you, end of story. :)
Mike, a GMRS licence is only about $75 US.
 

mbenonis

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Mike, a GMRS licence is only about $75 US.
Yes, but the license prohibits use by people other than those in your immediate family. And you have to ID every so often with your call sign.
 

avkid

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Yes, but the license prohibits use by people other than those in your immediate family. And you have to ID every so often with your call sign.
Why must you always kill my fun?:cry:
 

mbenonis

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Why must you always kill my fun?:cry:
I think it's in my job description :p

Wait, does GMRS actually have better range / quality? Or did I completely miss read that?
Yes, and yes. The primary difference between GMRS and FRS is the type of equipment you are permitted to use. FRS radio's cannot exceed 0.5W of output power, while GMRS radios are permitted to output up to 50W (though 4W is common). Additionally, FRS radio's must have built-in, non-detachable antennas, while GMRS radio's may use any kind of antenna. Essentially, this means one can use business-quality UHF radio's for GMRS, but must stick with the crappy $20 radio's for FRS.

I thought I had mentioned this above, but I guess not. MURS is similar to GMRS, but does not require a license and can be used for any purpose. No identification is required. However, there are only five frequencies allowed for use, and total output power is limited to two watts (however external gain antennas are permissible). One can use VHF business radio's for MURS, but must make sure they put out no more than two watts. MURS frequencies are:

151.820 MHz
151.880 MHz
151.940 MHz
154.570 MHz (also part of the business band)
154.600 MHz (also part of the business band)

I would consider MURS to be the ideal radio band for theatre use, because it is simple to get up and running and does not require paperwork.
 

mbenonis

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Most restaurant drive thru's use the 154.600 band. Just an interesting fact. You can place an order from home via radio.
Huh. I'll bring my scanner along next time I go to a drive through!
 

avkid

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Most restaurant drive thru's use the 154.600 band. Just an interesting fact. You can place an order from home via radio.
Oh sweet, we can terrorize the Wendy's down the block and possibly the McDonald's about a mile away.
 

mbenonis

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Oh sweet, we can terrorize the Wendy's down the block and possibly the McDonald's about a mile away.
I can just see the order-taker person freaking out because someone's ordering food and there's no car on the screen.
 

mbenonis

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A lot of restaurants are actually on HME gear, especially the various DX series. I know McDonalds uses them.
It's too bad it's digital...that's harder to monitor and, um, uh, have fun with.
 

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