The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

Control/Dimming Tom's Projects

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by TNasty, Jul 1, 2018.

  1. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    First Project!

    So the first project I'm working on is what I call the "Contender". It's basically an architectural lighting panel, just cheaper, running on an Arduino Uno, and features relays to cut power to the lights (helpful for when they're not in use for a while).
    Architectural Prototype.png
    The reason I'm making the Contender is so I can convince my dad to hang my batten in the garage- he'll get to use the lights as work lights when he's working on the mower or cars, and whatever else he does in the garage. Pretty much just a system that'll keep him from needing to learn the basics of some control software.

    I wouldn't be able to say the price of this so far, as I forget the price of the DMX shield (Maybe $30? Hard to guarantee that, since TinkerKit is now belly up), but really the only other things that'll cost much is the Arduino, nicer buttons, and *maybe* Neutrik connectors (I might also get the covers, considering the fact that it'll be in the garage, I don't want to clog up a connector with condensation or general crud).

    So far it's practically done as far as code construction and testing goes, so all that's left is cleaning up the code (there's a lot that can be shoved into functions), polishing up the unit (project box, actual buttons, the works), and creating the presets (which can't be recorded, so I need to pull the code from the Arduino, copy values into it, and then reflash it, but that's not too bad). I think I might be able to make it have three presets, basically by pressing both preset one and two at the same time. Another thing worth noting is that I'll probably need to use relays to switch between "active" and "passthrough" modes, unless somebody can tell me what I'd need to know about transistors for that, but in the meantime I can just switch the plug around.


    I'll upload a video on this within the week demonstrating some basic functionality and operation.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    Second Project!


    The next project I'm working on is a basic fader/control wing, which I'm calling "J-Wing" (I just had to somehow refer to Hendrix's "Little Wing", without mentioning the word little). I'm working on this because I want to actually finish more than 30 seconds of a light show before saying "nah, too much rhythm" or something (who doesn't love playing with faders? Not to mention mixing RBG with my G27 pedals isn't really logical, but certainly possible if you're still flexible and willing to settle on "okay" pallets). Currently it's going to run off an Arduino Mega, as I certainly want the 15 analog input pins instead of the Uno/Leonardo's 5.

    So the plan is to have 10 faders (ordered a ten pack of replacement Behringer slide pots from eBay... Interestingly that was the most economical option), 5 rotary pots, and I'm starting with 10 buttons (I could put more on, but I decided ten should be enough to start with... I also wound up getting Cherry MX Blue switches, because clicky mechanical switches, not to mention the keycap versatility).

    Basically since QLC+ works with HID inputs such as flight sticks and game pads, I figured there has to be some way to make/mod a controller to have faders instead of triggers and joys. I wound up going with the "make" route, because it only cost me like $12 for a Mega, compared to $20 for an Xbox controller. Amazingly, this one project has only cost $35, and I'll probably just fire up my 3D printer to make an enclosure and keycaps (although I did buy the fader knobs, which I'm probably going to airbrush them with enamel in colors corresponding to a general config).

    I'd use a MIDI interface for this, except for the facts that I did find HID libraries for the Mega, it's just another thing that I'd need to buy, and I'd need cables and an adapter to actually use it. So no MIDI right now, but I might implement that down the line.
    I might also look into implementing ArtNet, but that may require stepping up to a Raspberry Pi, although I do like the idea of going wireless/networked with it down the line so that it can be used like a (W)RFU

    My friend/manager Chris also mentioned that we could use something like the J-Wing as a streaming control pad, along with some editing scripts.

    Here's a little representation of the J-Wing in QLC+ (only lacking the planned power LED):
    JWing Proto.png

    I'll have more on the J-Wing once stuff starts arriving for that.
    ------------------------------------------------

    Feedback is really appreciated; I likely plan on releasing the code as open source once it's in a polished enough state, along with accompanying How-To tutorials. I'll certainly take it into account while making the designs, because as I had said, I hope that other people will find the resources useful, and I might even sell a few prefab units to make some money on the side.
     
    STEVETERRY and JohnD like this.
  2. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    So a small update on the Contender project; talked about the idea of "work lights" with him, and we went out and bought the hardware to hang the batten. If he didn't spend the whole afternoon cleaning the garage, we likely would have put it up today, but I don't blame him (It was roughly 92 degrees today, and felt even worse in the garage without the breeze... Maybe I should get a massive fan for in there at some point), so it's going up on the 4th this week- Yay!

    If you're curious about the hardware we bought, we wound up going with 6' of 3/16" galvanized grade 30 proof chain, 4x quick links, and 2x eye hooks. The weakest point is the eye hooks, which are rated for 260 pounds- the quick links are rated for 450 pounds, and the chain is rated for 750... Certainly enough to hold a 10' steel batten with several lights (right now the batten and fixtures weigh just under 100 pounds in total), and if we ever needed a higher capacity, it'd be easy enough to upgrade to stronger anchors. All of this puts the batten just around two feet away from the ceiling, which is high enough to stay out of the way, but low enough I only need a step ladder we keep in the garage to adjust fixtures.

    With that said, I think either tomorrow or Tuesday I'll start cutting the lengths of chain (already marked, measured, and counted sections... I do have one extra link- go figures), and making some DMX cables (hopefully nobody minds the blue CAT5e, I'd use black if I had any on hand).

    Not sure if my dad was being serious when he said he wanted a party mode of sorts... luckily I think all of my fixtures have some autonomous macros, but it might be interesting to program a party mode preset anyways.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2018
  3. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Today's update:

    -Cut the chain for the batten... I love angle grinders, but I would've used cutters if we had any.
    -Started making cables, I plan on having ~10x 3' cables up on the batten, which should be just the right length to neatly manage, and just enough to act as quick disconnects for when I move/add fixtures.
    -I'm looking into getting two power strip "bars" (4' with 12 outlets or something), which would give me more than enough plugs, and not worry about if a power cord is going to reach.
    -Made a log video!


    Cut Chains:
    P_20180702_112116_vHDR_On_HP.jpg P_20180702_112455_vHDR_On_HP.jpg

    All of this is making me think that Chris and I should specialize in video production services; our "set" is getting more awesome each day, and he's already done a few paid music videos for some department guy for his school.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018
    Chris Pflieger likes this.
  4. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    So today progress was pretty slow. Soldering wires in the garage with sub-optimal lighting and excessive heat and humidity isn't quite enjoyable when you find out your favorite solder is dry, you don't have any rosin flux (all I have is Worthington petroleum based, which is worthless for anything electrical, unless you want it to be fully rusted over night, or give everything a nice rinse), and nobody within 20 miles carries rosin flux in their store. I digress- wound up going to a local hardware store and buying some silver bearing solder and flux marketed as "non-aggressive", and filling the solder cups on the connectors is a lot easier now, so hopefully the same holds true for actually wiring things up.

    Hopefully I'll be able to get some of the cables made tonight. Worst case, I do have enough cables laying around for temporary use, but I'd rather have consistent cable designs and lengths (and ones that I know are actually DMX). Really excited for the batten to go up tomorrow, as that'll allow me to do more testing with the Contender project, and also make the actual presets for it as well.
     
  5. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Having not made an update yesterday, there's a couple developments with the projects.

    Wednesday: Batten and fixtures got rigged! Took about 15 minutes to put the batten up. Ten of those fifteen minutes consisted of Dad fumbling with the tape measure trying to measure from the wall to get the rigging nice and square with the walls.
    P_20180705_123503_vHDR_On_HP.jpg P_20180704_221827_vHDR_On_HP.jpg
    There's still some rigging work to be done, as I still need to neatly run electrical to the batten, along with their DMX line. I'm also behind on making cables, so there's some DMX segments that are a tad tight.
    Personally, I think the batten has worked really well for the two days it's been hung for me. It's high enough that I don't need to duck under it, but it's low enough that I can do some focusing without a ladder (but it's certainly helpful).
    On a side note from Wednesday, Chris and I put an AC unit in the garage, so now it's actually bearable working in there, and amazingly gets to the point that it feels same in the house. Even better is that we're using the top of a pizza box to seal off the gap in the window, and the seams are covered with painter's tape. I just have to be careful, because there's two circuits in the garage, and one of them also powers Grandma's fridge (in the basement, on the literal opposite side of the house) along with an outlet outside next to her door- I really hate the electrician who okay'd this.

    As for today's happenings, the Arduino Mega for the JWing project arrived, but lacks the 16u2 chip needed for HoodLoader2 (custom code that makes the arduino show up as an HID device), despite the listing saying it had it. Talked to the seller about the issue, and not only has he fixed the listing, but also is sending a Mega with the 16u2 chip. Still trying to get over the fact that I basically just got two functional Megas for the price of one really cheap one.
    I also did a little tuning to the Contender code. Presets are now their own functions, which in turn means it's easier to find and edit the presets in the code. I've also finally coded in the preset LED indicators, which should help with system troubleshooting when things go wrong.

    Tomorrow I'll probably go out and get one of those weather resistant dual gang thermoplastic junction boxes. I am still debating if I want to drill and cut a faceplate myself, or if I want to custom order one from the likes of Redco and make it look real nice. Either way, it's hard to resist buying the Neutrik waterproof connector lid for the DMX port... just seems neat, but also like a good idea for an environment like a garage with all the potential for FOD.
     
  6. Les

    Les Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,026
    Likes Received:
    790
    Location:
    DFW, Tx.
    You need some yellow batten end caps to make it all legit!
     
    TNasty and RonHebbard like this.
  7. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    I was wondering what those were called and where to buy them- At $2.50 a piece, I very well might buy a set instead of just painting the thread caps yellow. Luckily I did in fact get 1-1/2" pipe, so that's perfect! I also like the space for max capacity, that's one less tag I'll have to put on something.

    I didn't get much done yesterday, since I spent most of the afternoon napping. However, the rotary potentiometers arrived along with a new dimmer/driver module for a Chauvet Intimidator 350 I've been working on (which seems to have fixed the random flicker issue), and I did get some electrical hardware from Home Depot including a dual gang PVC junction box by Hubbell, heavy plastic faceplate (trying to avoid metal, just to make things easier with holding the electronics for the Contender), an "Industrial" male power plug, and an illuminated female one (again, going with indicators to help with any troubleshooting... the female plug is going to be relay controlled). I also tested the plugs, and all is good with them.

    Today, it looks like most of the parts for the JWing project arrived at the post office, so I might be able to start some basic stuff with that; I'm just waiting on the Mega that actually has a 16u2 so I can start real work on it (currently USPS says it'll get here on Monday, which'll be a nice treat after my calc mid-term that day). I'll probably finish another cable or two, and do a little bit of cable management, and get DMX values for the presets for Dad to use. I might put them in the code today and do a quick sample for Dad.
     
  8. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Yesterday evening I had an epiphany and wanted to play around with ArtNet. The result? I now have a little Optiplex 760 running QLC in Ubuntu acting as an ArtNet --> DMX node, of which I plan to have running in the garage 24/7.
    P_20180707_224934_vHDR_On_HP.jpg
    Based on my observation that QLC's ArtNet output is "continuous" instead of "momentary" (based on activity LEDs, it's a continuous stream instead of only sending data when there's an update), I won't be using the normal house WiFi, but instead setting up an access point solely for ArtNet (direct ethernet will still be an option, but I like the idea of having one less thing to connect) so I don't jam one of the two AP's that service the rest of the house.
    That said, I'll be testing how DMX behaves when it's sent through a relay. The plan is that since I don't need simultaneous control with "NODE" (the ArtNet node) and the Contender, I'll make the Contender control a set of relays to "choose" the active DMX source. In short, NODE will be the default DMX source, but the Contender will "disconnect" NODE from the DMX line and "connect" its own DMX output to the line when it's engaged. This way I don't need to fiddle with patching every time I set up out there.

    Thinking about it, I could also power the Contender off of NODE, enable some sort of remote desktop, and I'd be able to remotely reprogram the Contender if I ever needed to do so. Pretty cool stuff if you ask me.

    Also, I did make (3?) more cables. Seems like I'm getting my old soldering skills back again. I'll probably make another log video today, which might show us working on the projects. If anybody's familiar with Blender, Chris has pretty much finished a set of batch files that bring a whole new level of automation to network rendering... He's got a "send to render" context menu entry, everything starts automatically, and then a script under "send to..." that fetches render outputs to the selected folder. Really cool stuff!
     
  9. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Today wasn't too big of a progress day for the main projects, but more so some testing and research.
    P_20180708_164821_vHDR_On_HP.jpg
    If you excuse the really messy wiring (it's just temporary, wanted to test as quickly as possible, so I wasn't going to solder and heatshrink things), this was the setup for testing if DMX kept its composure if sent through relays. Turns our it works perfectly fine, so relays it is for switching between the NODE and Contender for DMX. It is pretty satisfying hearing several relays click all at once. Only thing I did notice is that a couple fixtures may "blip" for a split second when switching, but that's not a huge concern right now. I might figure out how to do the same thing with MOSFETs or something after my EE course this fall.

    P_20180708_164558_vHDR_On_HP.jpg
    Here we have the very budget friendly project box for the control systems. A gang box is just a tad short for most of the stuff, a panel box seems overkill, and a lot of project boxes sell for a lot more than they really should ($25 for a little plastic box that just holds an arduino, not even considering space for plugs? Really?), so as a result this poor organizer box is about to learn a whole new definition for the word "useful". (Do we have an award for "Largest DMX Widget"?)

    P_20180708_194353_vHDR_On_HP.jpg
    Here we have the NODE in its current new home. It's a fairly basic system; boots Ubuntu, automatically opens the QLC+ workspace, and just sits converting ArtNet into DMX. Pretty much an over-the-top ArtNet node, but I like the fact that it offers a little more versatility, and that I already had the system on hand. In addition to NODE, there's a router that I've got DD-WRT loaded on, which is acting as a wireless client to get a decent wireless signal out in the garage (that's also dedicated for control data). I do love the somewhat novel aspect of being able to walk around the space with my laptop or tablet while controlling the lights, all without any wires on my end. I was concerned about latency at first, but the whole system seems pretty snappy, even over wireless (I do think I'll be doing direct out of my desktop when I'm working on my light shows, though).
    I also like how with this system in place, I can use any software that supports ArtNet (instead of needing support for the "Enttec" open DMX widget), just in case I run into a big issue with QLC.

    Tomorrow the new Arduino should show up, so I'll be able to actually start work on the Jwing project- Sweet.
     
  10. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Haven't done much the past day or two, so here's a quick update video I shot real quick a couple days ago but never linked here.
     
  11. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,253
    Likes Received:
    520
    Location:
    Illinois
    Lots of work, let us know.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  12. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    It's been a while since the last update; I just finished my math class last week. So now it's time to continue work on the projects (instead of packing up to head back to school in a couple weeks).

    Today I just got the Arduino to act as an HID controller, albeit there's only support for up to 8 axis, and every now and then when its CPU or something is a little inconsistent the analog values will "wobble". For about two hours of work (1st was figuring out how to load the HID packages without giving a blue smoke salute and wondering why the IDE kept getting stuck uploading just to figure out I had forgotten to change the selected board from an Uno to a Mega, 2nd was tracking down enough wires and a second breadboard since the faders are too long to fit on one). Regardless, it's working, which is freakin' awesome, at least when I think about how much similar systems can cost.
    P_20180729_132426_vHDR_On_HP.jpg

    I'll try to have a video of it in a couple days, it's just a matter of stitching everything together, polishing it a little bit more, and possibly putting some buttons on it.

    On the other end of things, Chris has been working on a cool project involving a DMX controlled RGB strip, voice control, and text to speech that does things such as flashing lights red while reading a weather alert, going turquoise when doing the "briefing" (time, weather, file count in render destinations, social media followers, and a few other nifty things), and a bunch of other neato things. I might be able to make a video on that if he's up for it.
     
  13. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Quick little update here.

    Switched from using the wing as an HID Game pad in favor of using it as a MIDI controller- It seems that it works better all around. It's more consistent with its values and helps avoid the limitations HID presented with the number of buttons and axis. Now I can use all 16 analog inputs on the Mega no problem, and even use all 40+ digital pins as well. I'm very happy that I switched to MIDI, it's just that it seemed a tad bit confusing at first, which is why I initially went for HID.

    I'm just imagining the possibilities with all those inputs... I could literally do anything with them. And this is all on one controller. I'll have to fix my 3D printer, reinstall Solidworks, and start making some enclosures for this thing.
     
  14. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Wow, it's hard to believe it's almost been two months since the last update. Free time has been hard to find between classes, school work, and my job, but that's not going to get in the way of my inner tinkerer. I may not be working on the Contender for a while (as I don't have a system I want to use it on with me here at school), and the J-Wing may have dropped in priority (for now...). I have a new project, which isn't really "creating" anything, as I'm sure some of you work with similar things on the regular (hint hint, nudge nudge to the architectural lighting control guys, especially the ones in Vegas).

    This new project is basically just lighting up my bedroom with DMX, all controlled using absolute timecode through my desktop (or an RPi down the line). In essence, it's the "poor man's Phillips Hue". I can set the time I'll be waking up at, have the lights gently fade in order to augment my phone and Google Home's morning alarm duty (especially important when I wake up at 4:00 for a football traffic detail). I can also set a bedtime, have the lights fade amber through the evening, and then fade out around that set time.

    So far I've bought a DMX decoder for the LED strip I have going around my room, a dimmer pack for my floor lamp (and maybe my box fan down the line for the SnG's), and a 100w white LED par can (it's a single COB, non-RGB, LED, which I feel is better for color clarity, and I don't get funky shadows) that I plan on using as a bounce light on my ceiling (instead of using the existing ceiling light; I'm not going to mess with the electrical in my apartment... maybe in my own house, but not in an apartment where I need to avoid damaging walls at all costs).

    A bunch of the stuff should be showing up this weekend, into next week. I just won't have a lot of time to mess around with it until later next week, and even that is a strong maybe- mainly depending on what work I get assigned, and how prepared I am for my math exam. At least I should have a few minutes here and there that I can use to test things (mainly just looking at pretty colors and making things strobe).

    Hopefully this project not only helps me sleep more efficiently, but also show some people the cool things you can do with DMX.
     
  15. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Gonna keep this update as short as possible- I've got a lot of work, and I really shouldn't spend half an hour composing a post right now.

    A bunch of the stuff has started arriving, I've got the cables, the DMX decoder, and the dimmer pack. The LED fixture should be getting here later this week. I've gone ahead and done some basic programming, and I now have the lights running on a cycle to help me fall asleep and wake up based on a clock in QLC.

    Oddly enough, my DMX interface no longer plays nicely on my desktop, and the DMX decoder seems to only update every 30 seconds, but the dimmer pack works perfectly fine. To make it even more interesting, it all works perfectly on my laptop, except for the fact that one of the USB ports on it has the same exact issue as all the ones on my desktop. Very interesting. So for the time being, I'm just running my laptop as an ArtNet node, and I've ordered a DMXKing UltraDMX2 Pro interface (basically an Enttec DMX USB Pro clone). It's about time I stopped using interfaces that cost me $5 to "make", and not even give them an enclosure.
     
  16. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,253
    Likes Received:
    520
    Location:
    Illinois
    Funny, you and I are working in exactly different nerd types of ways. I'm tonight finally opening up the cover to the 25Amp AC/DC Macbeth Arc wash light c.1910 at most for date... looking at what is a self sustaining carbon arch mechanism on it. Looking at it, scratching head, looking further.. a... possibly variable resistance to current flow concept of electromagnet with a plate at the top of it to shunt or stop the arc when warn out... or an off switch. And I can also see a possibly a hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder that's compromised or in not knowing what it does or is, might work fine for what ever it does also attached to the gears but not wiring. That plus lots of gears and arms doing stuff and only guesses in how it all worked at this point. I have a 1916 pocket sized product catalogue from a different company listing products with self sustaining arc lights.. why such things went out of existence I have no idea, nor how it works. Before I take apart to restore & perhaps make work, I need to know how it/why it works. At least at this point I have a general understanding on how the resistance coils - counter balance to the arc concept works. Once I get the high temp ceramic epoxy primer in next week, hopefully I can re-assemble the broken ceramic resistor coil supports and re-wire the resistor coils.

    Any replies on the subject if info on how the mech. works should go to the other post on that carbon arc.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  17. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    I'm gonna get a video up here later today/tomorrow, as I've got most of the automation system running, and I'm really only working on fine tuning things at this point (such as getting good fade times, fixing the lights going off then going amber on occasion, and trying to keep my computer from installing updates and freezing and leaving me to wake up in the dark to that classic crashed computer sound).

    Amazingly enough, the "100 watt" white LED fixture is just about enough to light the room perfectly, except for noon and afternoon when the sun shines through my window and I just need a little more "umph". The LED strips really don't do much during the day other than make corners seem less dark, but really help set an amber tone in the evening.
    It's hard to acknowledge the fact that I've put in nearly $500 on the project, but then again, I really don't want to explain to the police officer how wiring the existing ceiling light into my project burned down the apartment, especially if I'm gonna see him around the office and on football traffic later that week.
     
  18. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,253
    Likes Received:
    520
    Location:
    Illinois
    Slow down in inventing something! You need a break to relax in seemingly hard work done above my head! Take a break and think it out during or before testing and expected results. Best efforts are not when exhausted and "just getting it done" when alone in doing it. There is no competition here and sounds like a vacation needed = slow down. I am certainly not working on my projects every day - if it helps. Mis post perhaps but indication of view some movies or play some games in vacatrtion from your part in stepping away from a few days. This gonna help in the world not ending short of resting before finishing it. For now, that time awat helps you. Hope it helps in advice.
     
    TNasty likes this.
  19. TNasty

    TNasty Active Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    30
    Occupation:
    Technical Adviser. Aux Police Officer.
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Don't get too worried there ship, I've got some relaxing planned for next weekend- I've got my tickets to go see Metallica that Friday, and a bunch of friends and I are heading to Hersey park that Sunday. So don't you worry, I've found the time to kick back for a little bit; just the past four weeks or so has been an onslaught of exams and projects, but all that's really left is my matrices exam tonight, and a review of the university's production of Legally Blonde for my theatre class due at some point (I've gotta say, while the colors were beautiful thanks to what looked like ETC ColorSource Source 4's, there were quite a few really annoying mistakes in the aiming that bothered me the whole time- not things that should easily go unnoticed by a senior lighting designer, but that's beside the point).

    As for now, here's a "quick" video going over the room lighting system I've been working on. I kid you not, as I was writing this I wondered if I turned the ceiling light on... Nope- that darn 100 LED really does pack a decent punch.

    And on that note, back to studying I go.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice