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Touring Questions

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by punktech, Feb 12, 2007.

  1. punktech

    punktech Active Member

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    i'm thinking of doing concert tour lighting design and i have a few questions. what is the pay like? what is being on the road like? are there unionization options, or benefits (i read in a semi-old book that this is not the case at all but i am hoping for an update if there is any)? how is the job in general (rough, fun, complicated, exciting, etc.)? what are qualities that are beneficial? what are the educational requirements? where can i gain experience? is it a hard feild to break into? for women in the feild: what is it like for a woman (is there sexism?, or it is a good feild for "theatre-gals"?)? would you reccomend this feild to interested young LDs?

    finally: give me any advice that seems pertinent. tell any stories that are entertaining or educational.

    Thank You. ;)
     
  2. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    First, if you want to be an LD for rock, you either are going to be working some very crappy gigs on tour, or working as house LD for smaller clubs. Those are good places to get your start. Very rarely do the actual LD's go out on the road, and if they do they are usually called "lighting directors". If you want to play the production electrician thing, its a rather easy gig to get into, but takes a lot of work to get up to. I'm a theatre guy, which is a totally different ball game. The best way to break into the rock scene (at least this is a way...) is to get a job in a lighting shop that puts together tours. You have pretty good odds of getting on a tour through that shop. You will be a low level electrian, and if your lucky they might stick you up in a truss chair to run a spot. To build up to lighting director or what not takes a lot of time. A degree will help in this, but its not an end all be all. As far as life on the road is concerned, depends on what you are doing. If you are doing shed tours where you carry everything and have 1 night stands everywhere, life could suck. If you are doing arena tours with 4 or 5 night sit downs, then life is pretty sweet. If you are doing club tours with a console and 6 movers, life could suck. Head over to lightnetwork.com and read some post there if you really want to hear some good perrils of the road. As far as being a women goes, you are what you make of it. I hate to say it, but lighting is a very male ran industry. There are plenty of women out there. If you know your stuff, and do what you need to do, I don't think you will have a problem any more then any other women in any other field.
     
  3. mattm

    mattm Member

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    Your best bet is to find a shop that sends out tours, like Footer said. Keep in mind that you will not be a lighting designer, director, production manager, master electrician the moment you walk in the door. Those are positions that must be earned. I have no theater background except for the 1 year of college that I managed to attend. Now I run a dry hire rental shop and I have a couple of smaller tours out right now.

    As far as the road is concerned, it doesn't matter if your a women. Do your job, don't complain, and most importantly don't think you know everything. I have sent many of young kids packing because they were more concerned with they thought that they knew instead of doing their job and doing it right.

    Education, for the most part, is an after thought in concert touring. You can learn everything you need to know in the shop or on the road. It's all about how well you do your job and who you know.

    Life on the road can be the most lonely thing you could ever imagine. Some people like it, others can get burned out in a year. You won't know until you actually get out on the road.

    Matt McCormick
    www.cablepick.com
     
  4. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    My company started as a touring lighting and staging outfit in 1973. For the next 15 or so years we were out with everyone from Kool & the Gang to Willie Nelson, from Billy Joel to Hot Tuna.

    If you're young and healthy it can be exciting and although there is a huge work load it's even fun.

    The advise offered above is excellent, I suggest you follow it.
     
  5. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    IMO, a lot has to do with:

    a) the advance work. If the rig is well designed with the venues in mind, it can be ok. I've been out a couple times with a bad rig that was way too large for 50% of the venues. So every show we were basically re-designing. BTW, everything still had to come out of the truck because on a one truck tour lighting usually goes on the back end of the truck, sound in the front.

    b) the local crews. If they don't know what they're doing, it can be a pain. I've been given security guards as local crew. You know it's going to be a long day when you have to explain which end of the dmx line is male.

    c) general accommodations. Sometimes the catering is nothing better than local carryout. After a couple days of McWendyKing you can get sick really fast. Make sure to eat your veggies and take your vitamins. Also, the bus can be really disgusting, so bring a sleeping bag. And don't count on a shower every day, either. If the bus doesn't have one, and the venue doesn't have them ...

    Money is up to you, and it varies widely. One guy I know is on retainer for a band and even when he's NOT working he makes $2K a week. But he's a really good designer/programmer and has been with them for years. Typically, a lighting crew chief can make $1,500 - $2,500 for the tour, again depending on experience, size of the rig, etc.
     
  6. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    2 things len pointed out are very true. I would also suggest gettting on an overhire list for your nearest IA local. This will give you a good guide on what its like to be on a "good tour" and a "bad tour". It will also let you see how these tours come together in a space.

    And as far as catering goes... At every wal-mart stop get granola bars and stuff like that that you can keep in your bunk. Your not always guaranteed a decent meal on a tour. For theatre the odds of getting decent food are a bit better because the talent tends to put more about food in their rider.

    This gives a good feeling about what life is like on the road...
    http://www.thesmokinggun.com/archive/1004061iggypop1.html
     
  7. punktech

    punktech Active Member

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    i'm really worried about how hard it is to get in to the touring industry. i've heard some people talk about it like it's nothing, and others have said i shouldn't hope to ever be an LD for anything above a C-list band (these people said that all the top bands hire from a select pool of people that aren't willing to take in new up-and-comers to often). what is it? can i dream of one day working for a band whose name makes people swoon?
     
  8. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    You can, but its going to take some time to get there. If you want to be an LD, go get a degree. Its there that you can learn about light really does.
     
  9. KaR356i

    KaR356i Member

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    Do you want to design or do you want to to be responsible for setting up truss and instruments, and run the board for the show? Do you want to supervise a crew of random people at each venue who may or may not have a clue? That would be something to decide on. And the advice you've been given is very good if you want to get your foot in the door! I am more of a theatre electrician, however I work at a roadhouse and we get many large concerts through the building each year. I also work at a large arena as an electrician for the bigger touring concerts, and often at a local music venue. Last year was the lighting director for a music festival. So I've seen my share of just about every size touring concert gig.

    About women in the business...When I was first deciding on making this my career, I had the same questions you do about being a woman in this field. So I observed as much as I could! What I have found is there are many female electricians on touring theatre shows, and I've seen a few on small touring concerts. These girls are consistantly EFFICIENT! They generally do their jobs very well, quickly, and quietly. I've worked with a few loud girls who seemed to feel the need to prove they were worthy, but ended up just doing a sloppy job because they were so busy chatting.

    I have NEVER seen a female electrician on a large touring concert, but I'm sure they probably exist somewhere :)

    Basically, just do your job well and don't get cocky :) You can prove yourself better by simply doing it right than talking about how well you do it :)

    Good luck!
     
  10. stantonsound

    stantonsound Active Member

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    It takes a great deal of work and a lot of luck. I am working my butt off to work my way up right now, and have been for the past several years. I started working sound and lighting for my college theatre, then on to community theater. I found a club that had national acts play often and enticed them to let me work there for free. I would set up the stage and get everything ready for the shows, and then learn from the sound and lighting techs during the shows. I am now one of their head techs, requested by the larger acts every time they return.

    It took a great deal of work, but I have worked for a few acts that just about anyone in the civilized world would recognize. As far as a permanent job with a touring company, I am still working on it.

    It is not glamorous, nor will it make you famous. That is not why I do it. I enjoy being a part of the entertainment and I enjoy the idea that I created (or helped create) this show everyday.

    My recommendation, work as much as possible. I have gotten great gigs in random ways. When working a $150 lighting gig at a church for a Christmas show, I got hired to be a lighting designer and tech for the trade show booth of an international company with a budget of $18,000. Best of all, I got to keep anything that was purchased (which is how I got my moving head fixtures and LED's).

    As far as education, there are many options. I got my degree in Physics, with a concentration in dynamic systems, which makes me a pretty good rigger, along with a minor in theater. I designed for quite a few shows, and am working in community theater to build my design resume.

    In short, work hard, build a good knowledge base, make friends with EVERYONE in the industry (don't kiss butt, no one likes this), and be ready when your big break comes in - it may only present itself once.
     
  11. bdesmond

    bdesmond Active Member

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    So i'll prefix this with while I'm out on the road every week, I'm not doing tours or anything related to this industry - I work for a consulting firm so I go where ever the business is. That said I can definetely identify with alot of things folks are saying here as far as some ups and downs:

    It can get lonely - being in the hotel (or where ever) everynight away from home and things can get old. Going to the beige room at the beige Mariott every night with nothing really to do besides either do work more work, watch tv, or maybe read a book.

    The hours - when I'm out on the road I don't have much to do - just means I spend more time in front of my laptop or whatever working

    The food - you're eating out or whatever every single day two or three times a day. This isn't the same as eating at home - there's more food, its not necessarily terribly healthy if at all, etc. You'll see the effects.

    Those are the big downsides for me and even then I still choose to do this every week, so they're obviously not killing things. I do things a little different in that I fly where ever work is and sometimes its the same place for weeks or months on end (I just ended a 3 month stint in Toledo, OH for example).
     
  12. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    PLSN Bookshelf would have the newest books on touring as published, after that for price, there is often other sources and or Amazon and or E-Bay for a used book price.

    On touring, I’m a home body... I like my house and like to sleep in my own bed. I have no desire to travel at all given I have not been on a plane in probably nine years, much less a bus for at least 15. Done local shows, much less work elbow to elbow with some of my bestist friends on the other hand that do the touring thing. They are often still a wee bit younger in that most of those who finally get prime position in touring often grow to tire of the 6 to 12 months out of the year being out on tour and never home once they grow older and perhaps get a life outside of living it. Such people’s primary concern later on is how to get a shop in theory 9:5 position.

    None the less, living the life is quite the thing. You get to lock say X in a road box, push him to the front of house in that box - thru the audience of fans, so as he can mix the band you are touring with that he wants to run the sound board for without getting stopped by way of fans in getting there. You do at times get to say go motorcycle shopping with X only for him to have to call home in asking permission from the significant other to buy another motorcycle as opposed to just doing so. This after say some shipping crates added onto the tour trailers for some certain motorcycles to ship safely within and ability to ride about between shows. As if a gang, perhaps at times the security, promotion and crew just take a ride. Some tours that could be anything from tour requirement of an added stove/oven which must become road box so the band can travel with it and cook breakfast, to an averting of the eyes by way of the crew when the talent enters the room. Some talent arrangements are aloof of their crew, others say write a song about them. Special tour stops to play soft ball in raiding the local to the stop WalMart so as to buy equipment? Yep, happens but always dependant and defiantly talent motivated these instances or concepts. Guys I work with have at times the rock stars over for summer barbicues as long years of touring buddies or even I get to tell the guys from a band that it's not cost effective to do something, or at times you are there to fix a problem and are only allowed on stage when the talent is not about.

    In some ways, you live with the band, hide the as it were at times “blow” or even put in a closet the “fans” that are backstage when the girl friend shows up, or at other times get kicked off the tour in becoming too personable with the talent. Certain tours for instance will as a known factor just kick off the tour one or two tech people at it’s start without a reason but in some way getting out the dead wood, they were not doing anything wrong, it’s just a standard that say two people will be fired from the tour before it gets under way. Other tours.. Can’t we all just get along? No apparent reason often means that if not on this tour, you are re-scheduled for the next tour after a slight now vacation at home. Vacation at home and or at the shop becomes the thing as opposed to being out on tour and never home. This if good at what you do and qualified. If not...

    Still touring means that sick or near death you get your part of the rig up and running than at times stumble back to the tour bus for at best a few moments of rest. Lots of drinking at times than waking up to stumble onto the tour bus - or searching for someone and that person having to explain how they got left behind. There is no sick days on tour unless the “artist” is so in which you would normally install than take down anyway. You are either in the hospital thus replaced and hopefully catch up with the tour later or doing the job no matter your health.

    On the other hand, there is the vacation days as it were in we have a day or three off and are in a place with lots of cash... what to do beyond some community family while on tour of drinking often. Lots of museums etc. Just heard a report today of some that were due back from a show but their snowed in plane route was cancelled. What did they do, the got to visit the USS New Jersey. Heck, I have had a model of that battle ship since I was a kid and would simply love to see it, these techies got to tour the museum of it while on a day off in not being able to travel home. Such people my friends and co-workers could simply not appreciate it as much as I would, this even given my first for the most part 8 hour day, five day in a week or more - this given I get to sleep at some point in my own bed. Out on tour, cash is easy for the most part, you get to see the latest in videos - what else are you doing while in the bus if not sleeping, and have the ready cash to buy what ever gives you comfort be it personal DVD player, or having time to read the latest novel. Tour pay is what people live for. Shop hourly pay sux, send me on tour is a common theme.

    As you say rough, fun,... would be accurate but don’t expect to show up and say here I am, send me on tour. As with the business in general, it’s now persay what you know, but who you know, than beyond that what you do. At times between shows, while bouncing around on the tour bus and not getting sleep you will be tasked with fixing say a hoist cable or a moving light that needs to work before you get to your next location. Had at best master all electrical theory and troubleshooting with such equipment or you are less than useless to the tour. That tour you are on has one purpose, it’s to get the show up and running for the talent to make their show. You can’t do it or get tired say at a 20 hour day for weeks straight between days off, and you find other work.

    There is a certain amount of skill you get from slinging cable in the shop in making no real money which unless absolutely special you won’t advance beyond in getting the tour. IA or non, you must become a name for yourself either as free lance or shop labor before you can hope to even do local shows. Time in grade - are you more qualified to fix or wire stuff than I am persay in getting to go on tour were I interested in even doing shows? Them most qualified to tour are those that can fix any equipment as they will need to on that tour, this much less and beyond that can fix what’s both normal and un-normal also attached to the show. Had tour people cursing me about some X show (say last year’s tour of the year) fluorescent/audience blinder pods they constantly had to repair. Sorry guys but I was mandated to use the old ballasts on the fluorescents, much less work with another department in making the fixture which was not by way of group think - easily accessible in repair. Now have in this case a chick from that tour that’s an expert I would hope by now on fluorescent wiring. This was her primary off show task in keeping them running.

    Chicks on tour is a sort of newer thing in the industry. A few years ago while as sounding board or person not so political - and importantly not in the chain of command that could by way of compliant kill someone’s career, I remember the complaints about the corporate think theory chicks not being safe on the tour bus as if a gang bang or something would happen while on it, or women as opposed to the guys, would loose their morals more so than guys thus become a problem. These days - women I know having broken that last bastion of sex discrimination falsehood are just as the guys out on tour and having fun or stress as with the guys... and doing well. If in extreme, what’s the difference anyway in a guy gaining a notch and a gal gaining a notch as it were, or in neither due to a certain record of gaining such notches while out on tour quickly becoming a bad idea once corporate disciplinary action be taken against you due to some wee screw up. Gals/guys, all are human and both are on tour. These days it’s leadership of the local crew and not plumbing that’s important.

    And boy some of the tales of the IA and non, Southern verses Northern at times local crew tales I hear about from all sorts of locations. Let’s say as far as crews, IA means nothing persay as to ability to get the show up and running as a concept (skilled and even professional labor or not) - unless you piss them off or don’t even have that amount of skill level where you do the show. Times “just point and shoot” and you are done, at other times, you know this would be easier if all of you went away already..... At such times especially it’s the touring crew and friends that get the show up and running even to the extent perhaps that the sound guy is perhaps not on the bus but helping you tie a multi to the truss or lifting a followspot stand onto the truss. You are as if a family on tour at times, those brothers and sisters you know you can trust or expect at least, those “brothers” locally, urr perhaps at times. Heck, at times even the truck drivers are more useful than the local crew. Than again at times not and everthing goes swimmingly.

    Still, you have to get on tour and known for your skill before you get on tour hopefully at least.

    In getting on tour, it’s perhaps best to work for a number or touring companies first so as to learn the ropes and get a name for yourself in perhaps sticking with that shop or going free lance. All time in grade based in knowing what the heck that you are doing. No matter the sex these days, those qualified are those qualified and there is lots of opportunity for tech people verses posers with glossy eyes about hanging out with the stars. Than once you learn your trade, at some point the former question comes up.

    As for union or not, that’s beyond a personal question, it more depends from where you work. Consider unions a fiefdom onto themselves so as to secure bread on the table for their members. A member of Local #2, doesn’t qualify you to pick up a cable in Local #1's area. Those local are much more qualified to do it safely than you. This no matter if they say know what the heck they are doing with it or how to safely do it or not. That’s a hard thing to deal with at times the in general “union problems” and one that at times takes patience in say three teamsters to un-pack by way of fork lift a single gallon at a time of haze fluid. Yep it happens. On the other hand you get into places that could deal with some training or, yep I’m a chick, get over it, or yep it’s a show get over it and get what I tell you to get done, done. Of locals, at times you often will find the best you can find the lesser what you might find elsewhere. Being a girl at times can be difficult unless your own leadership of a crew is sufficient for it’s need. Can be fun I’m sure also but overall can be more challenging than that of leading older people than you in a “them eating you alive” type of way.

    These days, locally you might find some sexism, but as part of the tour it’s most likely not going to be the case. The tour people will rely upon you for your ability and need it over any instinct. Just at times going to have to deal with the added drool factor if necessary on the local ends of labor. It perhaps as a woman will be a skill in leadership guys won’t have to learn but one that you can easily most likely master given lots of other chicks in the field already doing so.

    My advice, take a part in a touring company, eventually once you learn the ropes, go out on tour. Believe it or not, you are nothing special now until some time of proving yourself special as opposed to the next 100 people also with your dream. Earn your way in the industry an to the tour. Than decide later what to do with your career.

    It’s fun I’m told, you will probably love it in the end but get there first by way of earning it. Don't care who you are, you are either a pain in my rear by way of "tour support" or those that know what the heck they are doing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2007
  13. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Those whoe say it was easy were either really lucky and not qualified, or those who were wanna bees' whe were never really. Keep the dream alive as long as it's your primary dream and you will, but at some point it will be less the bragging rights or swooning and more just another tour under the belt. Yea, some tours are better than others, in the end the coolness factor of the tour will be as a band in question coolness factor of the experience in value.
     
  14. mattm

    mattm Member

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    Well said ship. If you really want to do it, you will do it for the love of doing it. Working for a top act is an after thought, its all about loving what you do and being in the right place at the right time.
     
  15. JSFox

    JSFox Active Member

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    Interesting read... Lots of good stuff.

    I toured for a number of years in the 70's and 80's. I think it was alot more fun then than now, but I do like todays technology better.

    If you're relatively intelligent, do your work, and stay out of trouble you should have no problem getting on tours. If you've got the itch - do it, there's no other way to scratch it.

    If lighting design is your thing then don't get focused just on the big tours because you likely won't get to do much designing for a while (though there are many exceptions). Work with local bands and clubs. Do good stuff with local bands. Don't just 'do lights', but design. Word will get around that you're good and other slightly more succesful groups might call and then one day one of your bands is a warm-up act...

    Branch out and do stuff other than rock. Dance is a great teacher of lighting design for R&R. Is there a version of Cirque in your town you can work with?

    In my retirement I'm teaching tech theatre part-time for a local high school and having more fun than ever. Nothin like applying a bit of R&R to the local musical...

    Finally, be careful what you wish for. It's a great industry and I've enjoyed every bit of it (well, most anyway), but it's not for everyone. I dropped out of college to do a Little River Band tour. Not sure that was the wisest decision I ever made.

    Good luck!
     
  16. RonaldBeal

    RonaldBeal Active Member

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    Getting a touring LD gig is part luck, part hard work, and part persistence.
    The LD's that design the big tours have been LD's for decades. Yes it usually does take that long to work up to those positions. Do you stand a chance of being the LD for the Rolling Stones, or U2? No. Do you stand a chance of becoming the LD for whoever is big in 20 years? Maybe.
    Other than relying solely on luck, there are 2 paths that give you the best odds of getting LD work.
    1. Work at a large club. You'll work with a lot of up and coming bands, and a lot of bands on their downward run as well. You may eventually hook up with one you like.
    2. Work for one of the large touring lighting companies (PRG, Upstageing, Ed and Teds, etc..) you'll start off in the shop, and eventually work your way up as a tour tech, Eventually the opportunity to move up will come.
    You have better odds of doing bigger tours through a lighting company, whereas a better chance of doing smaller tours sooner through clubs.
    Important hints:
    People skills are paramount. Leave attitudes and egos at home. The "I'm a designer and doing work is beneath me attitude" is a quick way to never get a job.
    When you start, Listen and learn, pay attention, ask questions.
    Know your limits, don't volunteer for stuff beyond your abilities
    There is some sexism in this business... it really depends on what group of people you go to work for. There are some places that will treat you like crap, and some that will treat you well.
    PRG Nashville is one female friendly place to work.
    Hope this helps
    RB
    Lighting crew chief, programmer, LD
    TV , rock and roll.
    Elton John
    Josh Groban
    Fleetwood Mac
    Sheryl Crow
    Live
    Barry Manilow
    Marc Anthony
    Christina Aguliera
    Matchbox 20
    just to name a few.
     
  17. Andy_Leviss

    Andy_Leviss Active Member Premium Member

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    Not really. Riders for theatrical tours don't typically involve food at all, the exception being required meals if there are two shows on a day without enough time for cast and crew to go out for a meal.

    If you're on a cushy tour doing sit-downs (as opposed to all one-nighters and splits) you'll typically have lots of time off, and enough time to run for food between the mat and evening shows on Saturday and Sunday. If you don't have enough time, catered meals can vary widely, from deli platters to a turkey dinner complete with all the trimmings, vegetarian options, and dessert. One-nighters are even moreso a case of lots of takeout/fast food or eating on the bus.

    Others have noted that touring isn't as glamorous as it seems, and to an extent, that's true. After a year and a half, all the hotels start to look the same, and they just blur together. I took to keeping a P-Touch strip that I could use as a dry erase surface on my console that said (along with some locally-varied settings notes), "You are currently in: ________" so I could remind myself where I was on the really confused weeks! That said, I loved it, and kinda miss touring. Some people just have it in their blood, and some don't.

    --Andy, who's spent the last year and a half parked in NYC after the better part of two years on nat'l tours, and isn't sure which he likes better :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2007
  18. punktech

    punktech Active Member

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    thank you so much everyone!!!

    ship: i'll read the giganto-post when i'm not also doing a paper for my Lighting Design tutorial...i guess it gives me something to look forward to at when i'm done and 2am.

    i'm already in college for lighting technology and design right now, so the schooling issue isn't that big. as soon as i figured out how high-tech a business like this is i knew i had to get at the very least a B.A..

    i love everyone's input, while something have been repeated i appreciate that i gives it more of a "survey" feeling and that's what i want. i want to hear everyboby's opinion even if it just is the same as one already posted just in different words. perhaps the different wording will have a different impact on me, who knows? continue anwsering the question and building on the response of others. and everyone who is also asking question out there, please add your's, maybe you'll figure out how to voice a question that's bothering me or someone else on here. i want this thread to be big and full of great advice and information, and so far, so good.

    keep up the great answers i appreciate it so much!

    a few more questions:
    -does the school that i gradute from with a BA matter???
    -i go to a rather small college, but they have a fairly nice theatre and pretty great equiptment, but should i transfer to antoher school with a better reputation, will that help???
    -should i persue a masters, and if so where can i find grad programs???
    -what are some good summer internship possiblities for someone into theatrical and concert lighting design (preferrably in the North East, please)???

    and RonaldBeal: you worked for Live?!?!?! awesome i love them, great band, fun shows!
     
  19. bdesmond

    bdesmond Active Member

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    Location:
    Chicago, IL USA
    IMHO the thing with the name of the school is just coming down to folks recognizing a big name. Someone doing hiring who is smart will realize that you can get just as good if not a better education from a small school as from a large one. Some of the best guys I know in the IT industry went to schools I've never heard of had I not met them.

    I don't get the feeling that this industry you're going to be working in is one to pay more for a masters, it's too ladder based but I would defer that to someone who knows better here. Personally I'd tell you to go get some work experience before you make that investment, but that's just me.

    The northeast is kind of a big place (is there someplace in particular you're envisioning?) but I tend to loop New York City into that definition which last I checked has no shortage of theater...
     
  20. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Chicagoland
    Your education is very important, especially if you want to work in legit theatre and not rock and roll. However, if you do concert touring, it's not what your diploma says, it's what you can get done NOW. Time is tight, time is money, and there's no time for people who can't get it DONE.

    I'm basically what's called "Chief Electrician" when I tour, which means it's my job to get the lighting rig from the truck to the air. I don't rig, I don't fix broken lights, I don't even have to know how to program (although I can do all of that). But what I can do is manage the local crew and lead them efficiently, who I've never met before and who have no clue how the rig is supposed to look. The longer I take to do that, the later the sound goes in, the later the backline goes in, the later the sound check has to be, the more $ everything costs.
     

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