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Translucent drop layout

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by garlicfingers, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. garlicfingers

    garlicfingers Member

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    Location:
    Central NY
    I just painted a set of legs on voile. I had problems with paint collecting near plastic ridges. I'm about to paint the second set and am looking for a better method.
    I'm painting sheer fabric it's like pantyhose, but no stretch. I'm painting down on a concrete floor. I've laid out plywood strips to staple to. I laid plastic. I pulled the fabric taught, starched it to size and painted.
    I am having trouble with the plastic pooling up paint and with starch blobs showing in the fabric when lit from behind.

    I know there is a better way.

    I don't have money or time to build a frame that's big enough to float the fabric off the floor. Its 17' x 24'
     
  2. kicknargel

    kicknargel Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if it would work on the sheer, but for regular drops, it's common practice to build a small bridge that lifts a few feet of the perimeter of the drop a few inches off the floor, and allows you to blow a carpet fan under the drop, so it doesn't stick to the floor.
     
    Van likes this.
  3. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I've always used bogus paper under the fabric rather than plastic (visqueen?). Never built a bridge and fan; I learned that trick here.
     
    kicknargel, RonHebbard and Van like this.
  4. Dionysus

    Dionysus Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    Ive used plywood with ... geez the name is on the tip of my tounge.... a particle board that is rather absorbant anyways. Why can't I think of what it's called?

    Anyways the plywood makes a stiff base and the ... other stuff... will absorb some of the moisture and help things from pooling or taking forevor to dry. Just take it slow with plenty of time between paint applications to help things from getting too moist. Works a treat, especially for lighter treatments you want to see though or shine light though.
     
  5. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @Dionysus Steve; Is: "the name is on the tip of your tounge" by any chance Homasote / Homosote (Sp?) an absorbent, rigid compressed paper product commonly sold in 4' x 8' sheets and often used to cover ice rinks in arenas prior to laying down flooring for ice level seating during concert events? Also often used for sound deadening in forms of modular decks / stages?
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard.
     
  6. Dionysus

    Dionysus Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I believe so. However the letter T to start is still sticking in my head. Regardless anything like that would work, a softer board that will draw away the moisture from the drop is the idea.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.

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