trivia question of the day

Van

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Heres a question for a test of weird knowledge.

What does the 64 or 56 refer to when talking about Par cans. Maybe it's easier than I thought everybody prove me wrong ? Of course Bill and Ship you are disqualified from answering :mrgreen:
 

soundlight

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1/8ths of an inch. A PAR 64 is 8 inches across, and 8*8=64. A Birdie (PAR16) is 2 inches, so 16 1/8ths of an inch.
 

Van

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**** , That was a lot quicker than I thought ! I didn't think you'd get it that quickly I guess I'll have to think up something harder
 

soundlight

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I'm known for pulling out the weirdest bits of technical theater trivia.
 

ship

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oh' oh' me me.. darn...
Nope, great question. Let's all keep this part of the forum alive no matter easy or hard. Brain tease is a brain tease. A #8 screw is #8 by reference to what given it certainly is not an inch or metric decimal. Simple questions illuminate others even if quickly answered by others.
 

propmonkey

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Milwaukee, WI
something to do with the thread spacing
 

ship

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That would be correct if I specified something like #8-32 but in this case I specified only #8 - could be a drywall screw even.
 

sound_nerd

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Nov 24, 2004
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Toronto Ontario
It's the screw diameter, right? I'm not sure of the system of measurement though...
 

SHARYNF

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Sep 3, 2006
This is an example of the wierd way things get classified

If you take the diameter of the head in sixteenths of an inch, take about one and double it you will have the classification
say the head is 6 sixteenths of an inch, that is a 10


Sharyn
 

SHARYNF

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Sep 3, 2006
Here is another brain teaser

You have a boat floating in a tank of water with a heavy iron beam inside, you drop the beam over the side into the water, does the water rise or fall in the tank?

Sharyn
 

propmonkey

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Milwaukee, WI
neither. the beam displaces the same amount of water in the boat as out.
 

SHARYNF

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And another

If a Boeing 747 sits on a newly designed runway that consists of of rolling belt so that as the wheels roll forward, the belt also rolls exactly in sync, when the jets are developing full thrust will the 747 take off?

Sharyn
 

propmonkey

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if i undertand that correctly, it wont move. its like someone running on a treadmill.
 

Van

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And another

If a Boeing 747 sits on a newly designed runway that consists of of rolling belt so that as the wheels roll forward, the belt also rolls exactly in sync, when the jets are developing full thrust will the 747 take off?

Sharyn
Relativity, it's a ***** ain't it ?
 

SHARYNF

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We will have to see how the various answers go, the answers are not as obvious as most people first think :)

Sharyn
 

sound_nerd

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Water falls....the weight of the beam inside the boat makes the water rise, but once dropped in the water there is less pressure area on the water, so it falls.
 

Diarmuid

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Cornwall, UK
Ok, on the water question:
If my understanding is correct, then when you put something in something else such as a boat, then it doesnt push down and displace as much as it would out of the boat and just in the water. So basically, I think the water would rise, as the iron would probably while in the boat not be totally submurged, and would probably not displace as much as it would if it was submerged. Of course all of that would depend on various things like whether the water had anything like salt in it, making it more boyannt and the shape and make-up of the boat.

On the Boeing question:

If the wheels are rolling exactly in sync, does that mean the wheels on the belt are also rolling forwards, in which case, the Boeing, would probably take off twice as easy as it would be going at its own full speed as well as the full speed of the rubber belt, thus doubling the planes speed; kind of like one of those flat escalator things they have at airports, where you can stand on it and go at a set speed, or you can walk, whilst standing on it and go at about double your normal walking speed. Of course as soon as it leaves the ground, it could come into problems, because of the way its speed would be almost cut by half... but thats another matter.

Diarmuid